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Japanese Conjunctions: Learn Japanese Linking Words

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If you’re learning Japanese grammar, you may be surprised by how many variations there are of Japanese conjunctions and Japanese connective particles, and how they vary depending on the use of sentences.

When you think about speaking your mother tongue, the flow of your sentences is very natural, without redundancy or lack of words. This is because you can use conjunctions effectively and naturally to connect sentences.

In this way, in Japanese grammar, conjunctions are one of the most essential parts of speech. When you master Japanese conjunctions, you’ll be able to speak Japanese quite fluently!

By the end of this article, you should have a better idea about Japanese conjunctions meaning, how to use Japanese conjunctions, and have an increased Japanese conjunction vocabulary!

Here are some of the most basic and useful Japanese conjunctions and connectives. Let’s enjoy learning here at JapanesePod101.com!

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Table of Contents

  1. What is a Conjunction?
  2. Conjunctions to Correlate Similar Thoughts
  3. Conjunctions to Express Condition
  4. Conjunctions to Express Cause
  5. Conjunctions to Express Opposition
  6. Conjunctions to Express Choices
  7. Other Useful Japanese Conjunctions
  8. Conclusion: How JapanesePod101 Can Help You Learn More Japanese


1. What is a Conjunction?

Sentence Patterns

Conjunctions are words that connect and conjoin phrases, clauses, or sentences together. A conjunction word doesn’t have a meaning itself, much like prepositions. Conjunctions in Japanese function similarly to how they do in English.

The conjunction in Japanese is usually a particle or postposition that’s usually used at the end of the dependent clause(s), determining the relationship of the conjoined clauses. Examples of these relationships include copulative, disjunctive, adversative, and conclusive.

For example, here are the most common Japanese conjunctions by type:

  • Copulative Conjunctions: The conjunctive relation of units that expresses the addition and/or connection of meanings.

    And:
    と、(to)
    や、 (ya)
    そして (soshite)

    Also:
    も、(mo)
    もまた (mo mata)

    Then:
    そして、 (soshite)
    それから (sorekara)

    Or:
    または、(mata wa)
    また (mata)

  • Disjunctive Conjunctions: The conjunctive relation of units that expresses the disjunction of their meanings.

    -or, -or : -ka, -ka ‥か、‥か
    -and, -and : -ya, -ya ‥や、‥や

  • Adversative Conjunctions: The conjunctive relation of units that expresses the opposition of their meanings.

    But:
    しかし、(shikashi)
    が、(ga)
    けど (kedo)
    けれども (keredomo)
    なのに (nanoni)
    でも (demo)

    However:
    しかしながら、 (shikashinagara)
    ところが (tokoroga)
     
    Despite:
    にもかかわらず (nimokakawarazu)

  • Conclusive Conjunctions

    So:
    それで、(sorede)
    なので (nanode)

    And then:
    それから、(sorekara)
    その後 (sonogo)

    Therefore: 
    それゆえに、(soreyue ni)
    だから、(dakara)
    したがって (shitagatte)

    Thus:
    ゆえに、(yue ni)
    したがって (shitagatte)

There are exceptions where Japanese language conjunctions can’t be used to connect equivalent clauses or sentences. However, we’ll explain the basic and most important Japanese conjunctions in this article.

Japanese Conjunctions

Japanese conjunctions have a wide range of variations


2. Conjunctions to Correlate Similar Thoughts

Here are the commonly used Japanese conjunctions which connect clauses/sentences with a function of addition.

1- と (to)

  • Meaning: This word means “and.” It simply adds one thing to another.
  • Usage:と(to) is used when you list everything that’s applicable. と (to) can only be used to connect nouns.
  • Example:

    テーブルの上にりんごみかんバナナがあります。
    Tēburu no ue ni ringo to mikan to banana ga arimasu.
    There are apples, oranges, and bananas on the table.

    • In this case, there are only apples, oranges, and bananas on the table.

2- や (ya)

  • Meaning: This word means “and.” It adds one thing to another.
  • Usage: や (ya) is similar to と (to), but it’s used when you list only some parts of a whole, which are applicable. や (ya) can only be used to connect nouns.
  • Example:

    テーブルの上にりんごみかんがあります。
    Tēburu no ue ni ringo ya mikan ga arimasu.
    There are apples and oranges on the table.

    • The translation in English is the same as that for the example for と (to). In this case, however, it implies that there are things besides the apple and orange on the table.

3- そして (soshite)

  • Meaning: This word means “and.” It adds things to each other, like the last words. It can also mean “thus” and “and then.”
  • Usage: そして (soshite) is used to add noun(s), or to explain an action that follows.
  • Example:

    テーブルの上にりんごとみかん、そしてバナナがあります。
    Tēburu no ue ni ringo to mikan, soshite banana ga arimasu.
    There are apples, oranges, and bananas on the table.

    私はりんごを食べます。そしてみかんも食べます。
    Watashi wa ringo o tabemasu. Soshite mikan mo tabemasu.
    I’ll eat an apple. And then I’ll eat an orange, too.


3. Conjunctions to Express Condition

Improve Listening

There are several variations of Japanese conjunctions which are used to introduce a conditional clause.

1- もし (moshi)

  • Meaning: It means simply “if,” but it can also mean “in case” and “supposing.”
  • Usage: When using もし (moshi), the end of a sentence should be conjugated to the conditional form, such as: たら (-tara), なら (-nara), ならば (-naraba), or すると (-suruto).

    When the conditional form is emphasized, it’s possible to omit もし (moshi) and the sentence still keeps the expression of condition.

  • Example:

    もし明日雨が降るなら、ピクニックは中止です。
    Moshi ashita ame ga furu nara, pikunikku wa chūshi desu.
    If it rains tomorrow, the picnic will be cancelled.

2- たら (tara)

  • Meaning: This word means “if,” and it denotes a condition.
  • Usage: As mentioned above, たら (-tara) is used at the end of a clause/sentence, along withもし (moshi) at the beginning. It’s usually used to express a relationship of assumption, as well as a specific and one-time consequence.
  • Example:

    もし時間があったら、映画を見たいです。
    Moshi jikan ga attara, eiga o mitai desu.
    If I have time, I want to watch a movie.

3- なら (nara)

  • Meaning: This word means “if,” and it denotes a condition.
  • Usage: なら (-nara) is also used at the end of a clause/sentence, along withもし (moshi) at the beginning.

    Unlike たら (-tara), なら (-nara) is usually used to express a speaker’s decision, order, hope, or opinion of assumption when assuming a certain thing.

  • Example:

    京都へ行くなら、新幹線で行きたいです。
    Kyōto e iku nara, Shinkansen de ikitai desu.
    If I go to Kyoto, I want to go by Shinkansen.

4- すると (suruto)

  • Meaning: This word means “if,” and it denotes a condition.すると (suruto) can also mean “then.”
  • Usage: When using すると (suruto) as a conditional conjunction, と (to) or だと (da to) usually come in front of it. It expresses a relationship of assumption and a consequence.
  • Example:

    彼が間に合わないとすると、私たちは会議を始められません。
    Kare ga maniawanai to suruto, watashi-tachi wa kaigi o hajimeraremasen.
    If he can’t come in time, we can’t start a meeting.

Group Talking Over Drinks

When you use conjunctions effectively, conversations will go smoothly.


4. Conjunctions to Express Cause

There’s also a number of Japanese conjunctions which are used to express cause. Combining two clauses/sentences with the following conjunctions denotes a reason and result. In Japanese grammar, note that the clause/sentence that states the reason comes first.

1- だから (da kara) / から (kara)

  • Meaning: This word can mean “so,” “therefore,” or “thus.”
  • Usage: だから (da kara) and から (kara) are very similar. However, a noun usually comes in front of だから (da kara), and an adjective or verb comes before から (kara).
  • Example:

    明日は日曜日だから 仕事はしません。
    Ashita wa nichi-yōbi da kara shigoto wa shimasen.
    Tomorrow is Sunday, so I don’t work.

    太るからケーキは食べません。
    Futoru kara kēki wa tabemasen.
    I will get fat, so I don’t eat cakes.

When considering the word order in Japanese grammar, it’s easier to remember the meaning as “so” rather than “because,” to match the order in English grammar.

2- ので (node)

  • Meaning: This word means “so” or “thus.”
  • Usage: ので (node) is used the same way as から (kara), but ので (node) is somewhat more polite.
  • Example:

    辛いので食べられません。
    Karai node taberaremasen.
    It is spicy, so I can’t eat it.

3- ため (tame) / のため (no tame)

  • Meaning: This word can mean “because (of) …” or “as a consequence of …”
  • Usage: Both ため (tame) and のため (no tame) have the same meaning, but an adjective or verb usually comes before ため (tame), and a noun comes in front of のため (no tame).
  • Example:

    宝くじが当たったため、私は車を買いました。
    Takarakuji ga atatta tame, watashi wa kuruma o kaimashita.
    I bought a car because I won the lottery.

    のため電車は遅れました。
    Yuki no tame densha wa okuremashita.
    Because of the snow, the train was delayed.

4- なぜなら (nazenara)

  • Meaning: This word means “because.”
  • Usage: When you use なぜなら (nazenara), please remember that a sentence of a particular situation comes before なぜなら (nazenara), and a sentence to explain why follows it. It often comes with だから (da kara) or から (kara) to explain why.
  • Example:

    彼女は怒って帰りました。なぜなら彼氏が浮気したのを知ったからです。
    Kanojo wa okotte kaerimashita. Nazenara kareshi ga uwaki shita no o shitta kara desu.
    She got angry and left, because she came to know her boyfriend had cheated on her.

Two Women Talking

In order to learn which conjunction is appropriate to use and in what situation, try to listen to how Japanese people use Japanese conjunctions in various situations.


5. Conjunctions to Express Opposition

Here are several examples of Japanese conjunctions which are used to denote contrast.

1- しかし (shikashi) / でも (demo)

  • Meaning: This word means “but” or “however.”
  • Usage: Both しかし (shikashi) and でも (demo) are the most commonly used conjunctions to express opposition. They usually come at the beginning of a sentence and refer to the statement which was mentioned before. しかし (shikashi) is often used in formal situations, while でも (demo) is more casual and colloquial.
  • Example:

    気温は低く寒いです。しかし、 花が咲きました。
    Kion wa hikuku samui desu. Shikashi, hana ga sakimashita.
    The temperature is low and it’s cold. However, flowers bloom.

    外は暖かい。でも、風は冷たい。
    Soto wa atatakai. Demo, kaze wa tsumetai.
    It is warm outside. But the wind is cold.

2- が (ga) / だが (daga)

  • Meaning: This word means “but” or “however.”
  • Usage: が (ga) and だが (daga) are almost the same, but が (ga) is used to conjoin separate sentences with a comma, and だが (daga) is often used at the beginning of a sentence.
  • Example:

    お金はある、旅行する時間がない。
    O-kane wa aru ga, ryokō suru jikan ga nai.
    I have money, but I don’t have time to travel.

    春は好きです。だが、夏は好きではないです。
    Haru wa suki desu. Daga, natsu wa suki de wa nai desu.
    I like spring. But I don’t like summer.

3- ところが (tokoroga) / なのに (nanoni)

  • Meaning: This word means “but” or “however.”
  • Usage: ところが (tokoroga) and なのに (nanoni) have similar meanings which express reverse conditions. They have a nuance of surprise, or sometimes complaint, which contrasts the expectation. ところが (tokoroga) is more formal, while なのに (nanoni) is used in a casual way and in colloquial speech.
  • Example:

    彼女は勉強をしなかった。とことろが、試験に受かった。
    Kanojo wa benkyō o shinakatta. Tokoroga, shiken ni ukatta.
    She did not study. But she passed the examination.

    彼は先生だ。なのに、英語を話せない。
    Kare wa sensei da. Nanoni, eigo o hanasenai.
    He is a teacher. But he can’t speak English.

4- けど (kedo) / けれども (keredomo)

  • Meaning: This word can mean “but,” “however,” “though,” and “although.”
  • Usage: While しかし (shikashi) and でも (demo) are often used at the beginning of a sentence with a comma, けど (kedo) and けれども (keredomo) are used to conjoin two separate sentences to express reverse conditions.

    けど (kedo) and けれどもけど (keredomo) are almost the same. However, けれども (keredomo) is slightly more formal and polite, while けど (kedo) is often used in a casual way and in colloquial speech.

  • Example:

    外は暖かいけど、風は冷たい。
    Soto wa atatakai kedo, kaze wa tsumetai.
    It is warm outside, but the wind is cold.

    私は1ヶ月お菓子を食べなかったけれども、痩せなかった。
    Watashi wa ikkagetsu o-kashi o tabenakatta keredomo, yasenakatta.
    Although I didn’t eat snacks for a month, I didn’t lose weight.


6. Conjunctions to Express Choices

Improve Listening Part 2

Here are some basic Japanese conjunctions which are used to express choices and alternatives.

1- または (matawa) / もしくは (moshikuwa)

  • Meaning: This word means “or” or “otherwise.”
  • Usage: These conjunctions are used when you want to show options for something. または (matawa) and もしくは (moshikuwa) are very similar, and there’s not much difference in their meaning and usage. または (matawa) is more common and is used more often than もしくは (moshikuwa).
  • Example:

    電車またはバスで行きます。
    Densha matawa basu de ikimasu.
    I will go by train or bus.

    クレジットカードもしくは、電子決済でお支払いください。
    Kurejitto cādo moshikuwa, denshi kessai de o-shiharai kudasai.
    Please pay by credit card or through an electric payment.

2- か (ka)

  • Meaning: This word means “or,” or “whether…or.”
  • Usage: か (ka) is almost the same in meaning as the English word “or.” With this meaning, か (ka) is usually used twice in a sentence to indicate alternatives.
  • Example:

    今レストランは開いている、 閉まっている、知っていますか。
    Ima resutoran wa aite iru ka, shimatte iru ka, shitte imasu ka.
    Do you know if the restaurant is open or closed now?

3- あるいは (aruiwa)

  • Meaning: This word means “or” or “alternatively.”
  • Usage: あるいは (aruiwa) is another Japanese conjunction to express a choice between A or B. This is often used to show things which are of the same or similar kind. It has a nuance of “alternatively.”
  • Example:

    私は来年大阪あるいは名古屋へ転勤になります。
    Watashi wa rainen Ōsaka aruiwa Nagoya e tenkin ni narimasu.
    I will be transferred to Osaka or Nagoya next year.

Woman Thinking

Some Japanese conjunctions are only used in colloquial speech, and some are mostly used in formal settings.


7. Other Useful Japanese Conjunctions

It is good to know other useful Japanese conjunctions to improve your conversation skills. Here are some commonly used expressions.

1- ところで (tokorode)

  • Meaning: This word means “by the way.”
  • Usage: This phrase is often used when you change the topic in a conversation, and it’s generally used before asking a question.
  • Example:

    ところで、今週末は何か予定ありますか。
    Tokorode, konshūmatsu wa nani ka yotei arimasu ka.
    By the way, do you have any plans for this weekend?

2- 一方で (ippō de)

  • Meaning: This phrase can mean “on the other hand,” “while,” or “meanwhile.”
  • Usage: 一方で (ippō de) is used to indicate that the following sentence will be in a direction different from the previous sentence. The following sentence doesn’t necessarily have to be completely opposite from the previous one. 一方で (ippō de) can be also be used to mean “while” or “meanwhile.”
  • Example:

    彼女は寿司が好きです。一方で彼はピザが好きです。
    Kanojo wa sushi ga suki desu. Ippō de kare wa piza ga suki desu.
    She likes sushi. On the other hand, he likes pizza.

3- 例えば (tatoeba)

  • Meaning: This means “for example.”
  • Usage: This phrase can be used exactly the same as “for example” in English. It’s used when you want to give examples.
  • Example:

    私の趣味はスポーツです。例えば、水泳とテニスが好きです。
    Watashi no shumi wa supōtsu desu. Tatoeba, suiei to tenisu ga suki desu.
    My hobby is sports. For example, I like swimming and tennis.

4- さらに (sarani) / その上 (sonoue)

  • Meaning: These words can mean “in addition” and “moreover.”
  • Usage: Bothさらに (sarani) and その上 (sonoue) are used when you want to add something. その上 (sonoue) has a slightly stronger emphasis thanさらに (sarani).その上 (sonoue) is literally translated as “on top of that.”
  • Example:

    日曜日に買い物へ行き、さらにジムへ行きました。
    Nichi-yōbi ni kaimono e iki, sarani jimu e ikimashita.
    I went shopping, and moreover, I went to the gym on Sunday.

    日曜日に買い物へ行き、さらにジムへ行きました。その上、夜は映画を見に行きました。
    Nichi-yōbi ni kaimono e iki, sarani jimu e ikimashita. Sonoue, yoru wa eiga o mi ni ikimashita.
    I went shopping, and in addition, I went to the gym on Sunday. Moreover, I went to see the movie.

Please see our article on Must-Know Adverbs and Phrases for Connecting Thoughts for more examples with audio.


8. Conclusion: How JapanesePod101 Can Help You Learn More Japanese

I hope this Japanese conjunctions list is helpful for your Japanese language studies. By learning Japanese conjunctions, your conversation skills will improve a lot, and you can enjoy speaking Japanese much more!

Which conjunctions do you plan on using soon? Which ones are you still struggling with? Let us know in the comments!

If you’re keen on learning more about the Japanese language, you’ll find more useful content on JapanesePod101.com. We provide a plethora of free lessons for you to help you boost your Japanese language skills, regardless of your current skill level:

All of your studying and practice will pay off, and soon you’ll be speaking and writing in Japanese like a native! And SpanishPod101 will be here throughout your language-learning journey with support and effective lesson materials!

Best wishes, and happy learning!

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Japanese Calendar Dates: Reading Dates in Japanese and More

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Learning how to read dates is one of the most basic things when learning a new language, and it’s essential in everyday life. For instance, you use dates when making appointments, buying tickets for a particular day, asking for someone’s birthday, etc.

Expressing the date in Japanese isn’t very complicated. The date in Japanese mostly follows the counter system, with just a few exceptions; English, on the other hand, has different names for the months and days of the week.

You’ll be able to learn dates in Japanese much easier once you know Japanese numbers. If you’re not yet familiar with numbers in Japanese, please visit Japanese Numbers on our website.

Table of Contents

  1. How are Dates Usually Expressed in Japanese?
  2. How to Say the Years in Japanese
  3. How to Say the Months in Japanese
  4. How to Say the Days in Japanese
  5. How to Say the Days of the Week in Japanese
  6. Practical Phrases to Talk about Dates in Japanese
  7. Conclusion: How JapanesePod101 Can Help You Learn More Japanese

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1. How are Dates Usually Expressed in Japanese?

Numbers

How to say dates in Japanese is very simple. Dates in Japanese writing start with the year, then the month, and finally the day. The only exception is when there’s a particular instruction to write it a different way, such as on an entry form.

1- How to Write Dates in Japanese

1. April 30, 2019 is written as follows:

2019年4月30日 or 2019/04/30  

  • 年 (nen) : year
  • 月 (gatsu) : month
  • 日(nichi) : day

2. With the days of the week, Tuesday, April 30th, 2019 is written as follows:

2019年4月30日 (火曜) or 2019年4月30日 (火)

  • The days of the week are usually indicated in a round bracket ( ) and placed after the day.
  • The name of the day is expressed in a short form.

Tuesday is 火曜日(ka-yōbi), but when it’s expressed in a written form, it usually becomes 火曜 (ka-yō) or just 火 (ka).

2- How to Read Dates in Japanese

2019年4月30日 (火曜) is read as follows:

Ni-sen jū-kyū / nen / shi / gatsu / san-jū / nichi / ka-yō

Literally translated as:
Two-thousand ten nine / year / four / month / three ten / day / Tuesday

To listen to the pronunciation of basic Japanese numbers, please visit Numbers on our website.

3- Examples

  • 今日は2019年1月13日です。
    Kyō wa ni-sen jū kyū-nen ichi-gatsu jū-san-nichi desu.
    Today is January 13th, 2019.
  • 私は1990年5月1日生まれです。
    Watashi wa sen kyū-hyaku kyū-jū-nen go-gatsu tsuitachi umare desu.
    I was born on May 1st, 1990.
  • 試験は2019年8月30日です。
    Shiken wa ni-sen jū kyū-nen hachi-gatsu san-jū-nichi desu.
    The examination is on August 30th, 2019.

Man Looking at Schedule

In Japan, keeping the date and time for appointments is very important. Please don’t mix up months and dates!


2. How to Say the Years in Japanese

1- Gregorian Calendar

The Gregorian calendar is very common in Japan to express the years.

Just say the year and then add “nen (年)” which is a year counter meaning ‘year’.

  • 1575年 : sen go-hyaku nana-jū go-nen
  • 1998年:sen kyū-hyaku kyū-jū hachi-nen
  • 2003年:ni-sen san-nen

In some cases, numbers can be expressed with the last two digits as a short version.

For example, 1998 is 98年 (kyū-jū hachi-nen).

2- Japanese Era Calendar

Did you know that there’s also a Japanese calendar?

The Japanese people use 和暦 (Wareki), or the Japanese era calendar, which is based on the reigns of Japanese emperors. The previous era was called 平成 (Heisei), which started on January 8, 1989, when the previous Emperor, Akihito, acceded to the throne following the death of his father. The current era is called 令和 (Reiwa), which started on May 1, 2019, when the current Emperor, Naruhito, acceded to the throne following the abdication of his father.

2019 is the first year of the Reiwa era. It’s written as 令和1年 and read as Reiwa ichi-nen.

This traditional Japanese era calendar is often used for official occasions and in written form, such as in official documents used for public services at a city hall.

3- Vocabulary for Describing Relative Years

  • 今年 ことし (Kotoshi) : This year
  • 去年 きょねん (Kyonen) : Last year
  • 一昨年 おととし (Ototoshi) : The year before last year
  • 来年 らいねん (Rainen) : Next year
  • 再来年 さらいねん (Sarainen) : The year after next year
  • 閏年 うるうどし (Urūdoshi) : Leap year
  • 毎年 まいとし (Maitoshi) : Every year

4- Examples

  • 今年は2019年です。
    Kotoshi wa ni-sen jū kyū-nen desu.
    This year is 2019.
  • 来年の2020年はうるう年です。
    Rainen no ni-sen ni-jū-nen wa urūdoshi desu.
    The next year of 2020 is a leap year.
  • 2005年は平成17年です。
    Ni-sen go-nen wa Heisei jū nana-nen desu.
    2005 was year seventeen of the Heisei era.
  • 私は2012年に結婚しました。
    Watashi wa ni-sen jū ni-nen ni kekkon shimashita. 
    I got married in 2012.


3. How to Say the Months in Japanese

Months

1- Saying the Month in Japanese: Japanese Months

Using months and dates in Japanese is very simple. It follows this simple pattern, without exception:

Name a number (1-12) of the month, and then just add 月 (gatsu), which is a month counter meaning “month.”

 

          English           Kanji           Hiragana           How to read
1           January           一月            いちがつ           ichi-gatsu
2           February            二月           にがつ           ni-gatsu
3           March            三月           さんがつ           san-gatsu
4           April            四月           しがつ           shi-gatsu
5           May           五月           ごがつ           go-gatsu
6           June            六月           ろくがつ           roku-gatsu
7           July            七月           しちがつ           shichi-gatsu
8           August           八月           はちがつ           hachi-gatsu
9           September           九月           くがつ           ku-gatsu
10           October           十月            じゅうがつ           jū-gatsu
11           November           十一月           じゅういちがつ           jū ichi-gatsu
12           December           十二月           じゅうにがつ           jū ni-gatsu

In order to listen to the pronunciation of the months in Japanese, please visit Talking about Months on our website.

2- Relative Vocabulary for the Month in Japanese

  • 今月 こんげつ (Kongetsu) : This month
  • 先月 せんげつ (Sengetsu) : Last month
  • 先々月 せんせんげつ (Sensengetsu) : Month before last month
  • 来月 らいげつ (Raigetsu) : Next month
  • 再来月 さらいげつ (Saraigetsu) : Next next month
  • 毎月 まいつき (Maitsuki) : Every month

3- Examples

  • 私は六月生まれです。
    Watashi wa roku-gatsu umare desu.
    I was born in June.
  • 日本では四月に学校が始まります。
    Nihon de wa shi-gatsu ni gakkō ga hajimarimasu.
    School starts in April in Japan.
  • 私の誕生日は先月でした。
    Watashi no tanjōbi wa sengetsu deshita.
    My birthday was last month.
  • 今月は仕事が忙しいです。
    Kongetsu wa shigoto ga isogashii desu.
    This month is busy with work.


4. How to Say the Days in Japanese

Weekdays

1- Days

How to say the days of the month in Japanese is a bit more complicated.

The basic pattern for days and dates in Japanese is number + 日 (nichi), which is a day counter meaning “day.”

All the dates are written in this pattern. However, when it comes to reading, there are some exceptions and irregularities, indicated in blue in the chart below.

The days, especially those from one to ten, have a unique reading which is very different from ordinary Japanese Numbers. After eleven, it’s basically read with regular numbers and 日 (nichi), except for fourteen, nineteen, twenty, twenty-four, and twenty-nine.

It’s very common to use Arabic numerals to express dates, together with the kanji 日 (nichi). For example: 1日, 24日, 30日, etc.

Dates are also often written in Kanji, especially in official documents and vertical writing scripts. 

English           Kanji           Hiragana           How to read
1st      一日      ついたち      tsuitachi
2nd      二日      ふつ・か      futsuka
3rd      三日      みっ・か      mikka
4th      四日      よっ・か      yokka
5th      五日       いつ・か     vitsuka
6th      六日      むい・か      muika
7th      七日      なの・か      nanoka
8th      八日      よう・か      yōka
9th      九日      ここの・か      kokonoka
10th      十日      とお・か      tōka
11th      十一日       じゅう・いち・にち      jū ichi-nichi
12th      十二日      じゅう・に・にち      jū ni-nichi
13th      十三日      じゅう・さん・にち      jū san-nichi
14th      十四日      じゅう・よっ・か      jū yokka
15th      十五日      じゅう・ご・にち      jū go-nichi
16th      十六日      じゅう・ろく・にち      jū roku-nichi
17th      十七日      じゅう・しち・にち      jū shichi-nichi
18th      十八日      じゅう・はち・にち      jū hachi-nichi
19th      十九日      じゅう・く・にち      jū ku-nichi
20th      二十日      はつ・か      hatsuka
21st      二十一日      に・じゅう・いち・にち      ni-jū ichi-nichi
22nd      二十二日      に・じゅう・に・にち      ni-jū ni-nichi
23rd      二十三日      に・じゅう・さん・にち      ni-jū san-nichi
24th      二十四日      に・じゅう・よっ・か      ni-jū yokka
25th      二十五日      に・じゅう・ご・にち      ni-jū go-nichi
26th      二十六日      に・じゅう・ろく・にち      ni-jū roku-nichi
27th      二十七日      に・じゅう・しち・にち      nijū shichi-nichi
28th      二十八日      に・じゅう・はち・にち      ni-jū hachi-nichi
29th      二十九日      に・じゅう・く・にち      ni-jū ku-nichi
30th      三十日      さん・じゅう・にち      san-jū-nichi
31st      三十一日      さん・じゅう・いち・にち      san-jū ichi-nichi

2- Relative Vocabulary for Days

  • 今日 きょう (Kyō) : Today
  • 昨日 きのう (Kinō) : Yesterday
  • 一昨日 おととい (Ototoi) : The day before yesterday
  • 明日 あした (Ashita) : Tomorrow
  • 明後日 あさって (Asatte) : The day after tomorrow
  • 毎日 まいにち (Mainichi) : Everyday

3- Examples

  • 今日は六月一日です。
    Kyō wa roku-gatsu tsuitachi desu.
    Today is June 1st.
  • 五月五日は子供の日で、祝日です。
    Go-gatsu itsuka wa kodomo no hi de, shukujistu desu.
    May 5th is Children’s Day and it is a national holiday.
  • 私の誕生日は二月二十日です。
    Watashi no tanjōbi wa ni-gatsu hatsuka desu.
    My birthday is February 20th.
  • 4月24日の天気予報は雨です。
    Shi-gatsu ni-jū yokka no tenki yohō wa ame desu.  
    The weather forecast on April 24th is rain.

Flipping Through Pages of a Calendar

The Japanese calendar often starts on Sunday.


5. How to Say the Days of the Week in Japanese

1- Days of the Week

How to say the days of the week in Japanese is simple. All of them are named after elements and nature, and they all end with 曜日(yōbi) which denotes a day of the week.

English      Kanji      Hiragana      How to read      Meaning
Monday      月曜日      げつ ようび      gets-yōbi      月 means “moon”
Tuesday      火曜日      か ようび      ka-yōbi      火 means “fire”
Wednesday      水曜日      すい ようび      su- yōbi      水 means “water”
Thursday      木曜日      もく ようび      moku-yōbi      木 means “wood”
Friday      金曜日      きん ようび      kin-yōbi      金 means “gold”
Saturday      土曜日      ど ようび      do-yōbi      土 means “earth”
Sunday      日曜日      にち ようび      nichi-yōbi      日 means “sun”

In order to listen to the pronunciation of the days of the week in Japanese, please visit Talking about Days on our website.

2- Relative Vocabularies of Week

“Week” in Japanese is 週 (shū).

  • 平日 へいじつ (Heijitsu) : Weekday
  • 週末 しゅうまつ (Shūmatsu) : Weekend
  • 今週 こんしゅう (Konshū) : This week
  • 先週 せんしゅう (Senshū) : Last week
  • 先々週 せんせんしゅう (Sensenshū) : Week before last week
  • 来週 らいしゅう (Raishū) : Next week
  • 再来週 さらいしゅう (Saraishū) : Next next week
  • 毎週 まいしゅう (Maishū) : Every week

3- Examples

  • 今週は金曜日が休みです。
    Konshū wa kin-yōbi ga yasumi desu.
    Friday is off this week.
  • 2月4日は月曜日です。
    Ni-gatsu yokka wa getsu-yōbi desu.
    February 4th is Monday.
  • 来週の土曜日は結婚記念日です。
    Raishū no do-yōbi wa kekkon kinenbi desu.
    Saturday of next week is a marriage anniversary.
  • 月曜日から金曜日まで仕事で忙しいです。
    Getsu-yōbi kara kin-yōbi made shigoto de isogashii desu.
    I am busy with work from Monday to Friday.

Person Writing on a Calendar Planner

Saturdays and Sundays are usually off at work and school in Japan, but some schools have classes on Saturdays and some people work on weekends.


6. Practical Phrases to Talk about Dates in Japanese

1- Appointments / Reservations

  • 2月14日は何か予定ありますか。
    Ni-gatsu jū-yokka wa nani ka yotei arimasu ka.
    Do you have any plans for February 14th?
  • 土曜日と日曜日の週末なら空いています。
    Do-yōbi to nichi-yōbi no shūmatsu nara aite imasu.
    I am free on weekends, Saturday and Sunday.
  • 12月25日に予約は取れますか。
    Jū ni-gatsu ni-jū go-nichi ni yoyaku wa toremasu ka.
    Can I make a reservation for December 25th?
  • 7月13日に予約をお願いします。
    Shichi-gatsu jū san-nichi ni yoyaku o onegai shimasu.
    Please make a reservation for July 13th.

Table with Reserved Sign On It

When you make an appointment or reservation, make sure you mention the date in addition to the day of the week.

2- Asking / Answering Questions

  • 今日は何日の何曜日ですか。
    Kyō wa nan-nichi no nan-yōbi desu ka.
    What day is it today?

    今日は3月10日の日曜日です。
    Kyō wa san-gatsu tōka no nichi-yōbi desu.
    Today is March 10th and Sunday.

  • あなたの誕生日はいつですか。
    Anata no tanjōbi wa itsu desu ka.
    When is your birthday?

    私の誕生日は8月7日です。
    Watashi no tanjōbi wa hachi-gatsu nanoka desu.
    My birthday is August 7th.

  • いつから学校が始まりますか。
    Itsu kara gakkō ga hajimarimasu ka.
    When does your school start?

    私の学校は4月1日に始まります。
    Watashi no gakkō wa shi-gatsu tsuitachi ni hajimarimasu.
    My school starts on April 1st.


7. Conclusion: How JapanesePod101 Can Help You Learn More Japanese

I hope this article about reading dates in Japanese is helpful for you to improve your Japanese. The date is one of the most important counters when it comes to numbers. There are a variety of Japanese counter words for each object, action, or event that you should also learn.

If you’d like to learn more about the Japanese language, you’ll find more useful content on JapanesePod101.com. We provide a variety of free lessons for you to improve your Japanese language skills.

On our YouTube channel, you’ll enjoy learning the Japanese language by watching videos and listening to actual Japanese pronunciation.

Before you go, let us know in the comments how you feel about reading dates in Japanese now! Do you feel like you know your way around Japanese calendar dates and saying dates in Japanese? Why not practice telling dates in Japanese by dropping us a comment with today’s date?

We always look forward to hearing from you!

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Talk About Family in Japanese: Father-in-Law and More!

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Learning a foreign language isn’t only about the language itself, but also about its culture, customs, and society. Family is the minimum unit of a social group, and it’s important to understand its characteristics as this is closely related to culture and customs.

When you learn how to explain your family in Japanese, it helps to expand your vocabulary and improve your communication skills in Japanese.

Compared to English, there are many more words to describe family members in Japanese. These words are according to age and the style (formal and informal). For example, what is a Japanese father-in-law called?

Let’s learn how to describe family in Japanese at JapanesePod101.com. Here’s our list of the most useful Japanese words and family member terms, as well as important information about family in Japan.

Table of Contents

  1. Family in Japan - Cultural Perspective
  2. Basic Family Terms
  3. Terms of Relatives
  4. Family Terms as a Married Person
  5. Endearment Terms
  6. How to Describe Family and Ask Question about Family in Japanese
  7. Conclusion: How Japanesepod101 Can Help You Learn More Japanese

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1. Family in Japan - Cultural Perspective

Family Quotes

Before we move onto the actual family vocabulary, it’s important that we go over family roles in Japanese culture, family values in Japanese society, and the importance of family in Japanese culture. This will give you a better idea of what to expect from Japanese families, and give more context to the Japanese family vocabulary and phrases you’re going to learn!

1- Traditional and Modern Family in Japan

The traditional Japanese family is characterized by the 家 (Ie) or family system, which is literally translated as “household.” It refers to a home and family’s lineage, which bestows importance of kinship and loyalty to their family.

Each member of a family is expected to serve their family’s interests (rather than the individual’s) as a priority. The Japanese family is traditionally patriarchal and a household usually consists of grandparents, their son, his wife, and their children. The eldest son is expected to inherit the household assets, and he’s responsible for taking care of his parents when they get old.

In the modern Japanese family, however, the influence of the traditional ie system isn’t as strong as it used to be. A 核家族 (kaku kazoku) or “nuclear family” is very common nowadays, and consists of two parents and their children, typically centering on a married couple.

While a married couple is expected to live together with a husband’s parents in the traditional Japanese family, grandparents don’t live with a kaku kazoku in a modern Japanese family (although they are visited often).

2- Becoming a Family in Japan (Marriage)

In Japan, the 戸籍 (Koseki) or “family registration system” is mandatory to all households. It requires that the family records all changes in family composition and identity, such as births, deaths, marriages, divorces, acknowledgements of paternity, adoptions, and disrupted adoptions.

It’s required to register one person as the head of a household, and the rest of the members in a household must have the same surname as that of the head. Once a couple gets married, spouses are obligated to have the same surname, and registration of different surnames is not allowed.

Due to the traditional system and the importance of kinship as custom, marriage isn’t only a matter of the bride and groom, but also of their extended family. It’s expected that extended families from both sides are going to have a “family relationship” once a couple gets married in Japan. As such, relationships with one’s in-laws become important.

3- Expressions of Family in Japan

There are various words to name family members in Japanese.

Japanese vocabulary words to describe family count age difference, and there are particular names related to age. This is because age is regarded as one of the most important attributions in the Japanese society, which is greatly influenced by the concept of Confucianism that states seniority is highly respected.

As relationships with in-laws are also culturally important, there are particular names for them as well.

In addition, there are variations of how to express family members, ranging from very casual to formal. Which ones to use depend on the occasion.

Let’s dive into the details in the following sections, and get you started with common family words in Japanese.


2. Basic Family Terms

Family Words

Now, it’s time to learn some basic Japanese words for family members. These are the words you’ll most often hear and use!

1- Basic Family Vocabularies

The formal terms are usually used for official occasions and in written form, while the informal terms are commonly used in casual situations (orally) as well as when calling a family member.

 

English Formal Informal
I / me 私(わたし -
watashi
father 父(ちち お父さん
chichi o-tō-san
mother 母(はは) お母さん
haha o-kā-san
older sister 姉(あね) お姉さん / お姉ちゃん
ane o-nee-san / o-nee-chan
younger sister 妹(いもうと) -
imōto
older brother 兄(あに) お兄さん / お兄ちゃん
ani o-nii-san / o-nii-chan
younger brother 弟(おとうと) -
otōto
grandfather 祖父(そふ) おじいさん / おじいちゃん
sofu o-jii-san / o-jii-chan
grandmother 祖母(そぼ) おばあさん / おばあちゃん
sobo o-bā-san / o-bā-chan
great grandfather 曽祖父 (そうそふ) ひいおじいさん/ ひいおじいちゃん
sōsofu hii-o-jii-san / hii-o-jii-chan
great grandmother

曽祖母(そうそぼ) ひいおばあさん/ ひいおばあちゃん
sobo hii-o-bā-san / hii-o-bā-chan
grandchild(ren) 孫 (まご)
mago
great grandchild(ren) ひ孫(ひまご)
himago

 

Family Leaving Home

Average modern Japanese families usually have 1 or 2 children.

2- More Vocabulary

  • 家族 かぞく (Kazoku) : family
  • 両親 りょうしん (Ryōshin) : parents (father & mother)
  • 親 おや (Oya) : parent(s)
  • 子供 こども (Kodomo) : child(ren)
  • 兄弟 きょうだい (Kyōdai) : brothers
  • 姉妹しまい (Shimai) : sisters

3- Examples

Here are some examples of Japanese phrases for family, so you have a better idea how to use the vocabulary above.

  • 私の家族は、お母さん、お父さん、私、弟の4人家族です。
    Watashi no kazoku wa, o-kā-san, o-tō-san, watashi, otōto no yo-nin kazoku desu.
    My family has four members: mother, father, me, and my younger brother.
  • 私は姉と妹がいる3姉妹です。
    Watashi wa ane to imōto ga iru san-shimai desu.
    I have an older sister and a younger sister, and we are three sisters.
  • 私は兄と姉がいます。
    Watashi wa ani to ane ga imasu.
    I have an older brother and an older sister.
  • 私は祖父と祖母が大好きです。
    Watashi wa sofu to sobo ga daisuki desu.
    I like my grandfather and grandmother very much.

To listen to the pronunciation of basic family terms, please visit Must-Know Terms for Family Members on our website.

Also, if you would like to know more about Japanese numbers, please visit our Japanese Numbers article.

Mother and Daughter Smiling

The bond between a mother and a daughter is often very strong.


3. Terms of Relatives

1- Vocabulary for Relatives

  • 親戚 しんせき (Shinseki) : relatives
  • 叔父 おじ (Oji) : uncle
  • 叔母 おば (Oba) : aunt
  • 甥 おい (Oi) : nephew
  • 姪 めい (Mei) : niece
  • いとこ (Itoko) : cousin

2- Examples

  • 私の親戚は全員東京に住んでいます。
    Watashi no shinseki wa zen’in Tōkyō ni sunde imasu.
    All my relatives live in Tokyo.
  • 私は5人いとこがいます。
    Watashi wa go-nin itoko ga imasu.
    I have five cousins.
  • 私の叔父と叔母は教師です。
    Watashi no oji to oba wa kyōshi desu.
    My uncle and my aunt are teachers.
  • 私の姪は5歳で、甥は2歳です。
    Watashi no mei wa go-sai de, oi wa ni-sai desu.
    My niece is five years old and my nephew is two years old.


4. Family Terms as a Married Person

1- Vocabulary to Know as a Married Person

  • 結婚 けっこん (Kekkon) : marriage
  • 既婚 きこん (Kikon) : married
  • 未婚 みこん (Mikon) : unmarried
  • 離婚 りこん (Rikon) : divorce
  • 夫 おっと (Otto) : husband
  • 妻 つま (Tsuma) : wife
  • 息子 むすこ (Musuko) : son
  • 娘 むすめ (Musume) : daughter
  • 義理の ぎりの (Giri no) : in-law

In order to express “XXX in-law,” add 義理の (Giri no) in front of XXX (the family member).

For example:

  • 義理の両親 (Giri no ryōshin) : parents-in-law
  • 義理の父 (Giri no chichi) : father-in-law
  • 義理の母 (Giri no haha) : mother-in-law
  • 義理の兄 (Giri no ani) : older brother-in-law
  • 義理の弟 (Giri no otōto) : younger brother-in-law
  • 義理の姉 (Giri no ane) : older sister-in-law
  • 義理の妹 (Giri no imōto) : younger sister-in-law

2- Examples

  • 私は夫と娘が1人います。
    Watashi wa otto to musume ga hitori imasu.
    I have a husband and one daughter.
  • 私の義理の父と母は大阪に住んでいます。
    Watashi no giri no chichi to haha wa Ōsaka ni sunde imasu.
    My father and mother in-law live in Osaka.
  • 私は既婚者で子供が2人います。
    Watashi wa kikonsha de kodomo ga futari imasu.
    I am married and I have two children.
  • 私の義理の両親は、私の息子におもちゃを買いました。
    Watashi no giri no ryōshin wa, watashi no musuko ni omocha o kaimashita.
    My parents-in-law bought a toy for my son.


5. Endearment Terms

Parents Phrases

In addition to the formal and informal terms for family, there are also more casual vocabulary words that you can call family members. It may vary from household to household, or on what kind of relationships there are between family members, but here are some examples. Just note that these are typically used in Japanese family relationships that are close.

1- Father

  • パパ (Papa) : papa

Like in English, “papa” is a common name to call a father in Japan, especially when children are very small. However, most Japanese people don’t use papa as they grow up.

  • 父ちゃん (Tō-chan) : dad

This term includes a nuance of cute and comical affection.

  • おやじ (Oyaji) : dad

This term is usually used by sons who are post-adolescent age. When they become adults, they often feel embarrassed to call their father papa or o-tō-san. This term also indicates a nuance of close affection.

2- Mother

  • ママ (Mama) : mama

Just like papa, mama is used especially when children are still small.

  • 母ちゃん (Kā-chan) : mom

This is the version of tō-chan used for mothers.

  • お袋 (Ofukuro) : mom

This is the mother version of oyaji.

3- Grandfather

  • じじ (Jiji) : grandpa

Grandchildren and their parents usually call a grandfather by this term when the grandchildren are still small. It indicates a nuance of cute affection.

  • じーじ (Jīji) : grandpa

This is very similar to jiji, but the first ji is pronounced longer.

4- Grandmother

  • ばば (Baba) : grandma

This is the grandmother version of jiji.

  • ばーば (Bāba) : grandma

This is the grandmother version of jīji.

Elderly Couple

Grandparents often have endearing nicknames when they have grandchildren.


6. How to Describe Family and Ask Question about Family in Japanese

Most of the time, there’s no problem with talking about family and relatives. When it comes to marital status and children, however, it can be a delicate matter. It can sometimes be inappropriate to ask someone about his/her marital status or if they have children, unless he/she is open and willing to talk. This is especially true for a woman in her 30s.

Here are some example questions and answers related to family.

Q:
何人家族ですか。
Nan-nin kazoku desu ka.
How many family members do you have?

A:
お父さん、お母さん、お姉ちゃん、私の4人家族です。
O-tō-san, o-kā-san, o-nee-chan, watashi no yo-nin kazoku desu.
I have four family members: father, mother, older sister, and me.

—–

Q:
兄弟はいますか。
Kyōdai wa imasu ka.
Do you have brothers and sisters?

*When asking a question, kyōdai can also refer to sisters.

A:
私は姉と弟がいます。
Watashi wa ane to otōto ga imasu.
I have an older sister and a younger brother.

—–

Q:
結婚していますか。
Kekkon shite imasu ka.
Are you married?

A:
はい、妻と子供が2人います。
Hai, tsuma to kodomo ga futari imasu.
Yes, I have a wife and two children.

—–

Q:
孫はいますか。
Mago wa imasu ka.
Do you have grandchildren?

A:
はい、私は孫が6人います。
Hai, watashi wa mago ga roku-nin imasu.
Yes, I have six grandchildren.

—–

Q:
ご両親はお元気ですか。
Go-ryōshin wa o-genki desu ka.
How are your parents?

*It’s polite to put go in front of ryōshin when you talk about someone’s parents.

A:
はい、私の父と母は元気です。
Hai, watashi no chichi to haha wa genki desu.
Yes, my father and mother are doing well.

—–

For more about self-introductions, please visit Introducing Yourself in Japanese on our website.


7. Conclusion: How Japanesepod101 Can Help You Learn More Japanese

I hope this article about family in Japanese culture is useful and that it helps to improve your Japanese communication skills.

If you would like to learn more about the Japanese language, you’ll find more useful content on JapanesePod101.com. We provide a variety of free lessons for you to improve your Japanese language skills. For example, Must-Know Terms for Family Members is helpful if you want to practice family terms in Japanese with audio.

We also have YouTube channel: JapanesePod101. It’s always fun to learn Japanese by watching videos and listening to actual Japanese pronunciation.

Before you go, let us know in the comments if there are any family terms you still want to know! And to practice, write a short paragraph about your family in basic Japanese. We look forward to hearing from you!

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Japanese Travel Phrases for an Enjoyable Trip to Japan

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Are you traveling to Japan and want to learn practical Japanese travel phrases? This article is designed to help you learn the most useful Japanese words for travel.

It’s always good to learn basic words when you travel to a foreign country. Not only does it make getting around easier, but it also allows you to enjoy communicating with the locals.

In general, Japanese people are not so good at speaking English, free wifi services aren’t very prevalent (especially outside of the central cities), and Japan is still more of a cash-based society than you may think. However, Japanese people are very kind; they’ll listen to you patiently and do their best to help. So just use these basic Japanese travel phrases to talk to Japanese people when you want to ask something.

When you speak even a little bit of Japanese, locals will appreciate your effort and will be more friendly. Here’s JapanesePod101’s list of practical Japanese travel phrases for your travels to Japan!

Table of Contents

  1. Greeting/Communication
  2. Asking for Directions
  3. Shopping
  4. Restaurants
  5. When You Need Help
  6. Conclusion: How JapanesePod101 Can Help You Learn More Japanese

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1. Greeting/Communication

Airplane Phrases

To begin our list of essential Japanese travel phrases, we’ll go over greetings and basic travel phrases in Japanese for solid communication. These simple Japanese travel phrases can make a world of difference in your conversations and overall experience in Japan.

1- こんにちは

  • Romanization: Kon’nichiwa
  • English Translation: Hello

In terms of must-know Japanese travel phrases, you probably already know that this is the most common Japanese greeting word. You can say this to anybody for any occasion during the daytime.

2- はい/いいえ

  • Romanization: Hai / Iie
  • English Translation: Yes / No

Hai is “Yes” and it’s pronounced like the English word “Hi.” In Japan, saying yes also means that you understand. Iie is “No” and it’s pronounced ‘EE-eh.’

3- ありがとうございます

  • Romanization: Arigatō gozaimasu
  • English Translation: Thank you

Arigatō gozaimasu is the polite way to say “Thank you” in Japanese, and you can use this for any occasion. In case of a casual situation, you can just say Arigatō, or even more casually, Dōmo (どうも) which means “Thanks.”

4- いいえ、いりません

  • Romanization: Iie, irimasen
  • English Translation: No, thank you.

It literally means “No, I don’t need it,” in Japanese. At a restaurant, say this phrase when a waiter offers to fill your glass of water and you don’t want more.

5- すみません

  • Romanization: Sumimasen
  • English Translation: I’m sorry / Excuse me

This word is usually used to say “sorry'’ or “excuse me”. Say this when you bump into someone in a crowd or when you ask someone for directions. Japanese people also use this to mean “thank you,” in some cases, such as when someone picks up something you dropped.

6- お願いします

  • Romanization: Onegai shimasu
  • English Translation: Please

When you request something, it’s polite to say Onegai shimasu. When someone offers you something and says please, she/he would say Dōzo (どうぞ) in Japanese.

7- 私はXXです

  • Romanization: Watashi wa XX desu.
  • English Translation: I am XX.

Watashi is “I,” wa is “am/is/are,” and desu is a present-tense word that links subjects and predicates; it’s placed at the end of a sentence. You can put your name, or your nationality, such as: Watashi wa Amerika-jin desu (私はアメリカ人です) which means “I am American.”  

Many Different Flags

8- 私は日本語がわかりません

  • Romanization: Watashi wa nihongo ga wakarimasen.
  • English Translation: I don’t understand Japanese.

Nihongo is stands for the Japanese language, and Wakarimasen means “I don’t understand.” If you don’t know something, you can just say Wakarimasen meaning “I don’t know.”

9- 英語を話せますか

  • Romanization: Eigo o hanasemasu ka
  • English Translation: Can you speak English?

This is one of the most useful Japanese phrases for travelers. Eigo means “English,” Hanasemasu is a polite way to say “I speak,” and ka is a word that you add to the end of a complete sentence to make a question.

10- 英語でお願いします

  • Romanization: Eigo de onegai shimasu
  • English Translation: English, please.

This is another important Japanese travel phrase. De is the particle, and in this case it means “by” or “by means of.” The phrase literally translates as “English by please.” You can also say M saizu de onegai shimasu (Mサイズでお願いします) which means “Medium size, please.”


2. Asking for Directions

Preparing to Travel

One of the most important Japanese travel phrases you should know are directions. Here are some useful vocabulary words and two Japanese language travel phrases you need to know!

1- Vocabulary

  • 駅 (Eki) : Station
  • 地下鉄 (Chikatetsu) : Subway/Metro
  • トイレ (Toire) : Toilet
  • 銀行 (Ginkō) : Bank
  • 切符売り場 (Kippu uriba) : Ticket machine/Office
  • 観光案内所 (Kankō annaijo) : Tourist information office
  • 入口 (Iriguchi) : Entrance
  • 出口 (Deguchi) : Exit
  • 右 (Migi) : Right
  • 左 (Hidari) : Left
  • まっすぐ (Massugu) : Straight
  • 曲がる (Magaru) : Turn
  • 交差点 (Kōsaten) : Intersection
  • 角 (Kado) : Corner

2- XXはどこですか

  • Romanization: XX wa doko desu ka
  • English Translation: Where is XX?

Doko means “where” and you replace XX with the name of where you want to go.

For example

  • Toire wa doko desu ka (Where is the toilet?)
  • Deguchi wa doko desu ka (Where is an exit?)

3- XX e wa dō ikeba ii desu ka (XXへはどう行けばいいですか) : How can I go to XX?

  • Romanization: XX e wa dō ikeba ii desu ka
  • English Translation: How can I go to XX?

is “how,” e is “to,” and ikeba ii can be translated as “good to go.” When you want to know how you can get somewhere, replace XX with where you want to go.

For example:

  • Eki e wa dō ikeba ii desu ka (How can I go to the station?)
  • Ginkō e wa dō ikeba ii desu ka (How can I go to the bank?)

4- Other Examples

1. この道をまっすぐ行きます (Kono michi o massugu ikimasu.):Go straight on this street.

Kono michi is “this street” and ikimasu is the polite way to say “Go.” O is a Japanese postpositional particle which indicates an object (in this case, kono michi).

2. 次の角を右へ曲がります (Tsugi no kado o migi e magarimasu.):Turn right at the next corner.

Tsugi no kado means “next corner” and magarimasu is the polite way to say “Turn.” E is another postpositional particle that indicates direction; this can be translated as the English word “to.”

3. 交差点を渡って左へ行きます (Kōsaten o watatte hidari e ikimasu.):Cross an intersection and go to the left (direction).

Watatte is a conjugated form of wataru which means “cross.”


3. Shopping

Basic Questions

You’ll definitely love shopping when traveling in Japan, and some of the best Japanese phrases for travel are those related to this fun past-time. Knowing some useful Japanese words will make your shopping even more enjoyable.

1- XXはありますか

  • Romanization: XX wa arimasu ka
  • English Translation: Do you have XX?

When you’re at a store and looking for something, you can use this phrase by replacing XX with what you want.

2- いくらですか

  • Romanization: Ikura desu ka
  • English Translation: How much is it?

This is probably one of the most useful Japanese words for traveling and shopping. You can say Ikura desu ka in many situations, such as when you’re shopping, buying tickets, paying for a taxi, etc.

3- 免税できますか

  • Romanization: Menzei dekimasu ka
  • English Translation: Can you do a tax exemption?

Did you know that, as a traveler, you can get a sales tax exemption when you purchase things greater than 5,000 yen? Menzei is “tax exempted” and dekimasu means “can do.” Don’t forget to say this when you buy something big!

4- これは何ですか

  • Romanization: Kore wa nan desu ka
  • English Translation: What is this?

Kore is “this” and nan is another form of nani which means “what.” There are many unique foods, gadgets, and things which are unique to Japan, so when you wonder what it is, point to it and say this phrase.

5- これを買います

  • Romanization: Kore o kaimasu
  • English Translation: I’ll buy this.

Kaimasu is the conjugation of the verb kau, which means “buy.”

6- カードは使えますか

  • Romanization: Kādo wa tsukaemasu ka
  • English Translation: Can I use a credit card?

Kādo is “card” and you pronounce it just like the English word “card.” Tsukaemasu is a conjugation of the potential form of the verb tsukau which means “use.” This phrase is useful when you want to use your card at small shops and restaurants.

Man and Woman Shopping


4. Restaurants

Japan has an array of delicious foods, of which sushi and ramen are just the tip of the iceberg. Amazingly, Tokyo is the city with the most Michelin-starred restaurants in the world, for several consecutive years. Enjoy yummy food at restaurants with useful Japanese words for restaurants and easy Japanese travel phrases related to food.

1- Vocabulary

  • 英語のメニュー (Eigo no menyū) : English menu
  • ベジタリアンのメニュー (Bejitarian no menyū) : Vegetarian menu
  • 豚肉を含まないメニュー (Butaniku o fukumanai menyū) : Menu without pork
  • 水 (Mizu) : Water
  • 白/赤ワイン (Shiro / Aka wain) : White / Red wine

2- XXはありますか

  • Romanization: XX wa arimasu ka
  • English Translation: Do you have XX?

When you want to ask if the restaurant has something you want, say this phrase (replacing XX with what you want).

For example:

  • Eigo no menyū wa arimasu ka (Do you have an English menu?)
  • Aka wain wa arimasu ka (Do you have red wine?)

3- XXをください

  • Romanization: XX o kudasai
  • English Translation: Can I have XX?

This is another very useful phrase. Simply replace XX with what you want. You can also use this versatile phrase in various occasions, such as when shopping, choosing something, etc.

For example:

  • Kore o kudasai (Can I have this?)
  • Mizu o kudasai (Can I have water?)

4- お会計お願いします

  • Romanization: O-kaikei onegai shimasu
  • English Translation: Check, please.

O-kaikei means “check.” In Japan, people often cross their index fingers in front of their face as a gesture to indicate “check, please” at casual restaurants. However, when you’re at a nice restaurant, simply tell a waiter: O-kaikei onegai shimasu.


5. When You Need Help

Survival Phrases

Sometimes you get faced with unexpected emergencies while you’re traveling. Japan is famous for being one of the safest countries in the world, but you might fall very ill or be caught in a great earthquake.

1- Vocabularies

  • 警察 (Keisatsu) : Police
  • 病院 (Byōin) : Hospital
  • 救急車 (Kyūkyūsha) : Ambulance
  • ドラッグストア/薬局 (Doraggu sutoa / Yakkyoku) : Drug Store/Pharmacy
  • タクシー (Takushī) : Taxi

2- XXを呼んでください

  • Romanization: XX o yonde kudasai
  • English Translation: Can you call XX?

When you’re severely ill or in case of emergency, let people know by using this phrase. Japanese people will kindly help you.

For example:

  • Yūkyūsha o yonde kudasai (Can you call an ambulance?)
  • Keisatsu o yonde kudasai (Can you call the police?)

3- どこでインターネットを使えますか

  • Romanization: Doko de intānetto o tsukaemasu ka
  • English Translation: Where can I use the internet?

Although large cities in Japan provide free public wifi at major stations, metros, and cafes, you may need to find internet access in smaller cities. Remember that there will be kind Japanese people who will share their personal hotspots, or look things up for you with their own phones, as well.

4- 電話を貸してください

  • Romanization: Denwa o kashite kudasai
  • English Translation: Can I use your phone?

Denwa is “phone” and kashite is a conjugation word of kasu, which means “lend.” This phrase is literally translated as “Please lend (me) a phone.”

5- 助けてください

  • Romanization: Tasukete kudasai
  • English Translation: Please help me.

I believe this phrase is the last thing you would ever use in Japan, but in case something does happen, this is useful survival Japanese for tourists.

Japanese Landmark


6. Conclusion: How JapanesePod101 Can Help You Learn More Japanese

I hope this article of Japanese travel phrases is helpful and that you’ll enjoy your trip to Japan!

If you would like to learn more about the Japanese language, you’ll find more useful content on JapanesePod101.com. We provide a variety of free lessons for you to improve your Japanese language skills.

We also have YouTube channel: JapanesePod101. It’s fun to learn Japanese through watching videos and listening to actual Japanese pronunciation, so we recommend you check it out!

Don’t forget to study with our free Japanese vocabulary lists, read more insightful blog posts like this one, and download our mobile apps to learn anywhere, anytime! Whatever your reason for learning Japanese, know that we’re here to help and you can do it! Keep in mind that the best way to learn Japanese phrases for travel is repetition and practice.

Before you go, let us know in the comments how you feel about using these useful travel phrases in Japanese after reading this article. More confident, or still a little confused about something? Feel free to ask questions in the comments!

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Japanese Numbers: Let’s Master the Basic Japanese Numbers!

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Numbers are necessary in everyday life as you need them to express time, record dates, interpret recipe amounts, count objects, and the list goes on. Japanese numerical systems have unique features and they are very different from those in English.

For example, Japanese has a variety of counter words depending on different factors. Further, large numbers are counted by units of four digits while the Western system counts by that of three digits, and the differences only continue for numbers in the Japanese language.

Let’s start to learn basic Japanese numbers with JapanesePod101.com!

Table of Contents

  1. Counting in Japanese: Numbers 0-9
  2. Counting in Japanese: Numbers 10-99
  3. Counting in Japanese: Numbers up to 1000
  4. Counting in Japanese: More than 10,000
  5. Decimal Fraction / Fraction Numbers in Japanese
  6. How to Say Prices in Japanese
  7. Shopping Using Numbers in Japanese
  8. How to Give Your Phone Number in Japanese
  9. Conclusion: How JapanesePod101.com Can Help You Learn More Japanese

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1. Counting in Japanese: Numbers 0-9

Japanese Numbers

漢字 Kanji ひらがな Hiragana Reading
0 ぜろ/れい Zero/Rei
1 いち Ichi
2 Ni
3 さん San
4 し/よん Shi/Yon
5 Go
6 ろく Roku
7 しち/なな Shichi/Nana
8 はち Hachi
9 く/きゅう Ku/Kyū
10 じゅう

These are the basic Japanese numbers for 0 to 10. You absolutely need to know these numbers in learning Japanese so that you can use them to build bigger numbers.

The standard way of reading 0 to 10 is also used in combination with counter words when you count anything, including actions and events. The Arabic numerals (0, 1, 2, 3…) are also commonly used in Japanese, but they often appear in horizontal texts, while the numbers in Kanji are mostly used in vertical texts, especially in formal writings and in particular situations.

As it’s written in the chart, there are some numbers which can be read two ways:

  • 0 can be ぜろ(Zero) or れい (Rei). Nowadays, “Zero” is more common to read, and the Kanji 零 is rarely used.
  • 4 can either be し(Shi) or よん (Yon).
  • 7 can either be しち(Shichi) or なな (Nana).
  • 9 can be either く(Ku) or きゅう (Kyū).

In most circumstances, both are acceptable. In general, よん (Yon), なな (Nana), and きゅう(Kyū) sound more casual and common.し(Shi), しち (Shichi), and く(Ku) sound more formal.


2. Counting in Japanese: Numbers 10-99

漢字 Kanji ひらがな Hiragana Reading Literal reading in Japanese
11 十一 じゅういち jū-ichi 10, 1
12 十二 じゅうに jū-ni 10, 2
13 十三 じゅうさん jū-san 10, 3
14 十四 じゅうし/よん jū-shi/yon 10, 4
15 十五 じゅうご jū-go 10, 5
16 十六 じゅうろく jū-roku 10, 6
17 十七 じゅうしち/なな jū-shichi/nana 10, 7
18 十八 じゅうはち jū-hachi 10, 8
19 十九 じゅうく/きゅう jū kyū/ku 10, 9
20 二十 にじゅう ni-jū 2, 10
21 二十一 にじゅういち ni-jū ichi 2, 10, 1
30 三十 さんじゅう san-jū 3, 10
40 四十 よんじゅう yon-jū 4, 10
50 五十 ごじゅう go-jū 5, 10
60 六十 ろくじゅう roku-jū 6, 10
70 七十 ななじゅう nana-jū 7, 10
80 八十 はちじゅう hachi-jū 8,10
90 九十 きゅうじゅう kyū-jū 9,10

You can count from 1 to 99 with just ten numbers (0-10). Japanese numbers are simple and easier to use than English in this respect because there’s no exception or particular separate words such as “twenty” or “thirty.” In Japanese, these are expressed “two ten” and “three ten.” 21 is “two ten one.”

The Arabic numerals are commonly used and Kanji is also used in some circumstances. However, Hiragana isn’t used to express numbers. Like the cases of idiomatic words or a combination of Kanji (熟語 じゅくご Jukugo), Hiragana can become long to express and hard to decipher.

For more on Japanese numbers, YouTube has some great content. Please visit our JapanesePod101 YouTube channel and watch Learn Japanese Numbers 1 to 20 to learn Japanese basic numbers. You can listen to hear how they’re actually pronounced.

Numbers


3. Counting in Japanese: Numbers up to 1000

漢字 Kanji ひらがな Hiragana Reading Literal reading in Japanese
100 ひゃく hyaku 100
200 二百 にひゃく ni-hyaku 2, 100
300 三百 さんびゃく san-byaku 3, 100
400 四百 よんひゃく yon-hyaku 4, 100
500 五百 ごひゃく go-hyaku 5, 100
600 六百 ろっぴゃく roppyaku 6, 100
700 七百 ななひゃく nana-hyaku 7, 100
800 八百 はっぴゃく happyaku 8, 100
900 九百 きゅうひゃく kyū-hyaku 9, 100
1000 せん sen 1000
1100 千百 せんひゃく sen hyaku 1000, 100
110 百十 ひゃくじゅう hyaku jū 100, 10
111 百十一 ひゃくじゅういち hyaku jū-ichi 100, 10, 1

From 100 to 1000, the pattern is basically simple and the same. In Japanese, as you can see in the chart, you can simply put the numbers 1 to 9 and add 100 to express 100 to 900 in Japanese. There are some exceptions for reading, such as 300, 600, and 800.

  • 100 is hyaku, but 300 is read san (3) Byaku (100)
  • 600 is roppyaku instead of “roku hyaku,”
  • 800 is happyaku instead of hachi hyaku.
  • 3000 is san (3) zen (100)
  • 8000 is hassen instead of hachi sen


4. Counting in Japanese: More than 10,000

漢字 Kanji ひらがな Hiragana Reading Literal reading in Japanese
10,000 まん man 10000
100,000 十万 じゅうまん jū-man 10, 10000
1,000,000 百万 ひゃくまん hyaku-man 100, 10000
10,000,000 千万 せんまん sen-man 1000, 10000
10^8 おく oku
10^12 ちょう chō

For the large numbers, Japanese numerals are divided into units of four (as in the four zeros in ten thousand). As you can see in the chart, 万 (man) is 10^4, 億 (oku) is 10^8, and 兆 (chō) is 10^12. One million is expressed as one hundred ten-thousands or 百万 (hyaku-man) in Japanese.

Note that you don’t need to put a 1 for 百 (hyaku) meaning 100 or 千 (sen) meaning 1000. But for units past 1000, you need to put a 1 in front. For example:

  • ichi-man ( 10^4 )
  • ichi-oku ( 10^8 )
  • ichhō ( 10^12 )

You also read numbers in Japanese in the same pattern as mentioned before. You can count by simply chaining the numbers. However, there’s also an exception for the large numbers: 10^12 is 兆 ichhō instead of ichi-chō.

For the large numbers, the Arabic numerals are used in combination with Kanji, such as in 5万 (go-man), 4千万 (Yon-sen-man), 100億 (hyaku-oku), 3兆 (san-chō), etc.

Our JapanesePod101 YouTube video How to Count to 600,000 in Japanese is useful to help you learn large Japanese numbers. Please check it out to see how you can count large numbers in Japanese.

Highlighting Numbers


5. Decimal Fraction / Fraction Numbers in Japanese

1- Decimal Fractions

ひらがな Hiragana Reading
0.1 れいてんいち rei ten ichi
0.03 れいてんれいさん rei ten rei san
0.005 れいてんれいれいご rei ten rei rei go

0 before the decimal point is read rei and 0 after the point can be either rei or zero. The decimal point is called ten which literally means “point.”

2- Fraction Numbers

Japanese writing ひらがな Hiragana Reading
1/2 2分の1 にぶんのいち ni bun no ichi
4/7 7分の4 ななぶんのよん nana bun no yon
3/10 10分の3 じゅうぶんのさん jū bun no san

For fraction numbers in Japanese, the number after / is read first. / is expressed as 分の (bun no).


6. How to Say Prices in Japanese

漢字 Kanji ひらがな Hiragana Reading
1 Yen 1円 いちえん ichi-en
5 Yen 5円 ごえん go-en
10 Yen 10円 じゅうえん jū-en
100 Yen 100円 ひゃくえん hyaku-en
1000 Yen 1000円 せんえん sen-en
5000 Yen 5000円 ごせんえん go-sen-en
10000 Yen 10000円 いちまんえん ichi-man-en

The Japanese currency is Yen and it’s read en. Expressing prices is very simple: you just use the numbers and en. The Arabic numerals are usually used for prices.

Clothes Shopping


7. Shopping Using Numbers in Japanese

The phrase いくら (ikura) which means “How much” is often used in shopping.

The word “Price” is 値段 ねだん (nedan) in Japanese.

Examples for Shopping:

  • A: このりんごの値段はいくらですか。
    A: Kono ringo no nedan wa ikura desu ka.
    A: How much is the price for this apple?

    B: りんご1つ120円です。
    B: Ringo hitotsu hyaku ni-jū-en desu.
    B: One apple is 120 yen.

  • A: これはいくらですか。 
    A: Kore wa ikura desu ka.
    A: How much is this?

    B: それは259円です。 
    B: Sore wa ni-hyaku go-jū kyū-en desu.
    B: It is 259 en.

  • A: 2万5千円の靴の値引きはいくらですか。
    A: Ni-man go-sen-en no kutsu no nebiki wa ikura desu ka.
    A: How much is a discount for the shoes of 25,000 yen?

    B: その靴の値引きは20%で、値段は2万円です。
    B: Sono kutsu no nebiki wa ni-juppāsento de, nedan wa ni-man-en desu.
    B: The discount for the shoes is 20%, and the price is 20,000 yen.

Please visit our JapanesePod101 YouTube channel to learn more helpful Japanese for shopping. The following are practical and useful Japanese for when you go shopping: Buying Items at a Register in Japan, Top 15 Must-Know Japanese Phrases to Go Shopping in Japan, and What’s Inside a Japanese Convenience Store?

Business Deal


8. How to Give Your Phone Number in Japanese

Telephone numbers are simple, as you can just chain numbers.

The words “telephone” and “number” are denwa and bangō in Japanese, respectively.

The only thing you should keep in mind is that “ - “ between numbers are read as no. Or, you can simply pause before giving the following numbers.

Examples:

  • A: あなたの携帯電話番号は何ですか。 
    A: Anata no keitai denwa bangō wa nan desu ka.
    A: What is your mobile telephone number?

    B:私の番号は090-1234-5678です。
    B: Watashi no bangō wa zero kyū zero no ichi ni san yon no go roku shichi hachi desu.
    B: My number is 090-1234-5678.

  • A: お問い合わせはフリーダイヤル0120-123-456におかけください。
    A: O-toiawase wa furī daiyaru zero ichi ni zero no ichi ni san no shi go roku ni okake kudasai.
    A: Please call to the toll-free 0120-123-456 for inquiries.


Conclusion: How JapanesePod101.com Can Help You Learn More Japanese

As we’ve seen, Japanese numbers are very simple to read. However, how to count things is a bit more complicated because there are a variety of Japanese counter words for each object, action, or event.

If you’d like to learn more about the Japanese language, you’ll find more useful content on JapanesePod101.com. We provide a variety of free lessons for you to improve your Japanese language skills.

On our YouTube channel, you’ll enjoy learning the Japanese language by watching videos and listening to actual Japanese pronunciation. For more about Japanese numbers, Numbers & Days, Learn Japanese Counters, and Learn Japanese Superstitions - Unlucky Numbers are helpful.

Further, for reading and writing Japanese, Learn to Read and Write Japanese is a good watch. For much more, please check out our YouTube channel!

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How To Post In Perfect Japanese on Social Media

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You’re learning to speak Japanese, and it’s going well. Your confidence is growing! So much so that you feel ready to share your experiences on social media—in Japanese.

At Learn Japanese, we make this easy for you to get it right the first time. Post like a boss with these phrases and guidelines, and get to practice your Japanese in the process.

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1. Talking about Your Restaurant Visit in Japanese

Eating out is fun, and often an experience you’d like to share. Take a pic, and start a conversation on social media in Japanese. Your friend will be amazed by your language skills…and perhaps your taste in restaurants!

Mamoru eats at a restaurant with his friends, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

POST

Let’s break down Mamoru’s post.

友だちと、しゃぶしゃぶ食べ放題なう。 (Tomodachi to, shabushabu tabehōdai nau.)
“At all-you-can-eat shabushabu with my friends now.”

1- 友だちと (Tomodachi to)

First is an expression meaning: “With my friends.”
It’s common to include information about who you’re spending time with in a social media post. However, eating or drinking alone is also common in Japan, and a lot of restaurants accommodate single customers.

2- しゃぶしゃぶ食べ放題なう (Shabushabu tabehōdai nau.)

Then comes the phrase - “At all-you-can-eat shabushabu now..”
All-you-can-eat cuisine is very popular in Japan. When you go to Japanese style bars, you’ll often see a menu that says all-you-can-eat or all-you-can-drink. A lot of Japanese people upload a post while they are still at the place, and share the latest status of themselves with others by emphasising that they’re “now” at the place.

COMMENTS

In response, Mamoru’s friends leave some comments.

1- 本当、おいしかったね。 (Hontō, oishikatta ne. )

His girlfriend, Hazuki, uses an expression meaning - “Indeed, it was delicious. ”
This expression shows you are appreciative of the quality of the food.

2- うわー、誘ってくれよ! (Uwā, sasotte kure yo!)

His college friend, Shō, uses an expression meaning - “What, why didn’t you invite me!”
With this expression, Shō is being playful.

3- こんど行くとき私も連れて行って〜。 (Kondo iku toki watashi mo tsurete ittē.)

His high school friend, Yui, uses an expression meaning - “You gotta take me with you next time.”
This phrase expresses a wish.

4- 高そう。。 (Takasō..)

His girlfriend’s nephew, Yamato, uses an expression meaning - “Looks expensive…”
Perhaps Yamato is a bit cynical? But he could also be appreciative of the restaurant or the food’s quality.

VOCABULARY

Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • 友だち (tomodachi): “friend”
  • しゃぶしゃぶ (shabushabu): “shabushabu (thin slices of beef and a variety of vegetables parboiled in hot soup usually eaten with sesame sauce or sour sauce called Ponzu)”
  • 食べ放題 (tabehōdai): “all-you-can-eat”
  • 本当 (hontō): “indeed”
  • おいしい (oishii): “delicious”
  • 誘う (sasou): “to invite”
  • 高い (takai): “expensive”
  • 連れて行く (tsurete iku): “to take someone with someone “
  • So, let’s practice a bit. If a friend posted something about having dinner with friends, which phrase would you use?

    Now go visit a Japanese restaurant, and wow the staff with your language skills!

    2. Post about Your Mall Visit in Japanese

    Another super topic for social media is shopping—everybody does it, most everybody loves it, and your friends on social media are probably curious about your shopping sprees! Share these Japanese phrases in posts when you visit a mall.

    Hazuki shops with her sister at the mall, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment

    POST

    Let’s break down Hazuki’s post.

    新しくできたお店に妹と。ものすごい列。。 (Atarashiku dekita o-mise ni imōto to. Monosugoi retsu̷ ;)
    “With my sis at the store that recently opened. What a super long line..”

    1- 新しくできたお店 (Atarashiku dekita o-mise)

    First is an expression meaning: “Newly opened store.”
    In Japan, sharing hot news and the latest information a common thing to do on social media. When you go to a recently-opened store that’s been mentioned on TV or on social media, it’s a perfect chance to show the world that you already went there before anyone else did!

    2- ものすごい列 (Monosugoi retsu)

    Then comes the phrase - “What a super long line.”
    Passing information by word of mouth is also one of the popular uses of social media in Japan. For example, you could check other people’s posts to calculate a less crowded time to visit the place!

    COMMENTS

    In response, Hazuki’s friends leave some comments.

    1- またショッピング? (Mata shoppingu?)

    Her nephew, Yamato, uses an expression meaning - “Shopping again?”
    Yamato is making conversation with this phrase..

    2- わたしも昨日ここにいた! (Watashi mo kinō koko ni ita!)

    Her high school friend, Manami, uses an expression meaning - “I was here yesterday, too!”
    This shares a detail of your life - good conversation starters!

    3- また服が増えるのか。。 (Mata fuku ga fueru no ka̷ ;)

    Her boyfriend, Mamoru, uses an expression meaning - “Oh, there we have more clothes…

    4- え、本当に妹さん?大人っぽい。 (E, hontō ni imōto-san? Otonappoi.)

    Her college friend, Shō, uses an expression meaning - “No, is that really your younger sister? She looks mature.”
    Use this expression to demonstrate surprise and even appreciation.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • 新しくできた (atarashiku dekita): “newly opened”
  • 妹 (imōto): “younger sister”
  • ものすごい (monosugoi): “incredible, super”
  • また (mata): “again”
  • いる (iru): “to be, to exist”
  • 増える (fueru): “to increase”
  • さん (san): “polite name suffix, similar to Mr. or Mrs.”
  • 大人っぽい (otonappoi): “mature”
  • So, if a friend posted something about going shopping, which phrase would you use?

    3. Talking about a Sport Day in Japanese

    Sport events, whether you’re the spectator or the sports person, offer fantastic opportunity for great social media posts. Learn some handy phrases and vocabulary to start a sport-on-the-beach conversation in Japanese.

    Mamoru plays with his friends at the beach, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Mamoru’s post.

    今年こそ、絶対勝つ! (Kotoshi koso, zettai katsu!)
    “This year, for sure, we must win!”

    1- 今年こそ (Kotoshi koso)

    First is an expression meaning “This year for sure.”
    Japanese people love sports, and often gather to play games after work or school. Watching sports games together with friends at a public space is also a big thing in Japan. Some of the most popular sports are baseball and soccer.

    2- ぜったい勝つ! (Zettai katsu!)

    Then comes the phrase - “we must win!.”
    This expression is used when you’re cheering for a team while watching a sports game. This phrase is also used when going into a match. It shows a strong determination. You can also replace the verb with other verbs.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Mamoru’s friends leave some comments.

    1- がんばれー! (Ganbarē!)

    His high school friend, Yui, uses an expression meaning - “Go for it!”
    Use this expression to show your enthusiastic support for your team.

    2- どこのビーチですか? (Doko no bīchi desu ka?)

    His neighbor, Yūko, uses an expression meaning - “Where’s the beach at?”
    This is a question to determine the location of the game. So, to gather information, use this phrase.

    3- けっきょく結果はどうだったの?笑 (Kekkyoku kekka wa dō datta no?wara)

    His girlfriend’s high school friend, Manami, uses an expression meaning - “So what was the result after all? lol”
    This question shows inquisitiveness.

    4- 大学時代を思い出すなあ。 (Daigaku jidai o omoidasu nā.)

    His supervisor, Norio, uses an expression meaning - “Reminds me of our college life.”
    Somewhat nostalgic, Norio holds a senior position at work, and is perhaps a bit old-fashioned.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • 今年 (kotoshi): “this year”
  • こそ (koso): “for sure”
  • 絶対 (zettai): “unconditional”
  • 勝つ (katsu): “to win”
  • がんばれ (ganbare): “Go for it”
  • けっきょく (kekkyoku): “after all”
  • 結果 (kekka): “result”
  • 思い出す (omoidasu): “to remember, V1″
  • Which phrase would you use if a friend posted something about sports?

    But sport is not the only thing you can play! Play some music, and share it on social media.

    4. Share a Song on Social Media in Japanese

    Music is the language of the soul, they say. So, don’t hold back—share what touches your soul with your friends!

    Hazuki shares a song she just heard at a party, posts an image of the artist, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Hazuki’s post.

    おすすめの1曲! (Osusume no ikkyoku!)
    “The one song I recommend!”

    1- おすすめの (Osusume no __)

    First is an expression meaning “__ to recommend.”
    Among the Japanese, it is pretty common to share something you like or recommend on social media. Add any noun right after this phrase to make a recommendation.

    2- 1曲 (ikkyoku)

    Then comes the phrase - “one song.”
    In Japanese, there are various types of counters you have to add after numbers. This counter is only one of them and is used to count “songs” and “music.”

    COMMENTS

    In response, Hazuki’s friends leave some comments.

    1- うわー、なつかしい。 (Uwā, natsukashii.)

    Her high school friend, Manami, uses an expression meaning - “Wow, how nostalgic.”
    This expresses an opinion about Hazuki’s choice of music.

    2- 名曲ですね。 (Meikyoku desu ne.)

    Her neighbor, Yūko, uses an expression meaning - “Classic, indeed.”
    This warmhearted comment is a response to the previous one about the song.

    3- 古すぎ。。 (Furusugi..)

    Her nephew, Yamato, uses an expression meaning - “Too old..”
    Yamato again doesn’t hold back on expressing his opinion. He finds the song dated.

    4- ぼくも昔このバンドの大ファンだったな。 (Boku mo mukashi kono bando no daifan datta na.)

    Her supervisor, Norio, uses an expression meaning - “I used to be a huge fan of this band. ”
    Again a nostalgic comment, with Norio reminiscing about his earlier taste in music.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • おすすめ (osusume): “recommendation”
  • 曲 (kyoku): “song, piece of music, counter for songs”
  • なつかしい (natsukashii): “missed, desired, nostalgic”
  • 名曲 (meikyoku): “famous song”
  • 古い (furui): “old (not person); Adj(i)”
  • 昔 (mukashi): “long ago”
  • バンド (bando): “band”
  • 大ファン (daifan): “huge fan”
  • Do you have a favorite song you would share? And what would you say to a friend posting a song?

    Now you know how to start a conversation about a song or a video on social media!

    5. Japanese Social Media Comments about a Concert

    Still on the theme of music—visiting live concerts and shows just have to be shared with your friends. Here are some handy phrases and vocab to wow your followers in Japanese!

    Mamoru goes to a concert, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Mamoru’s post.

    毎年恒例の夏フェスです。 (Maitoshi kōrei no natsufesu desu.)
    “Summer music festival like every year.”

    1- 毎年恒例の (Maitoshi kōrei no )

    First is an expression meaning: “Annual, like every year.”
    This expression is commonly used when you want to share a tradition you never fail to honor every year. In this sentence, you can see he’s emphasizing that going to a summer music festival has become a tradition for him.

    2- 夏フェスです (natsufesu desu)

    Then comes the phrase - “summer music festival.”
    It’s become more and more popular to go to summer music festivals in Japan. Then you will see a lot of pictures, videos and status updates on social media about them. You can replace the noun before “festival” with other nouns, for example, “winter”, “beach” or “rock” as well.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Mamoru’s friends leave some comments.

    1- 楽しそう! (Tanoshisō!)

    His high school friend, Yui, uses an expression meaning - “Looks fun!”
    Yui is making conversation and seems pretty positive and optimistic.

    2- すごい人だな。 (Sugoi hito da na.)

    His college friend, Shō, uses an expression meaning - “What a huge crowd of people. ”
    This conveys a sense of surprise.

    3- いっきに3キロやせた気分。。 (Ikki ni san-kiro yaseta kibun..)

    His girlfriend, Hazuki, uses an expression meaning - “I feel like we lost 3 kilos all at once..”
    Hazuki is sharing a feeling.

    4- よく飽きないね〜 (Yoku akinai nē)

    His girlfriend’s nephew, Yamato, uses an expression meaning - “No idea why you don’t get tired of it~”
    Yamato is not the most positive of people, is he? He’s commenting on this post with an opinion.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • 毎年 (maitoshi): “every year”
  • 恒例 (kōrei): “regular, customary”
  • 夏フェス (natsufesu): “summer music festival”
  • すごい (sugoi): “amazing, great, fabulous”
  • 一気に (ikki ni): “at once, in one go”
  • 痩せる (yaseru): “to lose weight”
  • 気分 (kibun): “feeling”
  • 飽きる (akiru): “to get tired of, to lose interest in; V2″
  • If a friend posted something about a concert, which phrase would you use?

    6. Talking about an Unfortunate Accident in Japanese

    Oh dear. You broke something by accident. Tell friends about it by using these Japanese phrases in a thread on social media. Or maybe just to let your friends know why you are not contacting them!

    Hazuki accidentally breaks her mobile phone, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Hazuki’s post.

    ついにやってしまった。。 (Tsui ni yatte shimatta.. )
    “I finally did it.. ”

    1- ついに (Tsui ni )

    First is an expression meaning “Finally.”
    Japanese use this word when something that they expected would happen someday has finally happened.

    2- やってしまった (yatte shimatta)

    Then comes the phrase - “I did it.”
    You can say this expression when you have done something bad. It’s a good opening line to catch people’s attention as well.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Hazuki’s friends leave some comments.

    1- どこで、なんでこんなことに? (Doko de, nande konna koto ni?)

    Her college friend, Shō, uses an expression meaning - “Where and how did that happen?”
    Her friend is curious as to how Hazuki broke her phone, and is also making conversation.

    2- えー!これはショック。 (Ē! Kore wa shokku.)

    Her high school friend, Manami, uses an expression meaning - “Oh no, this is a shock. ”
    This expression shows sympathy with the accident.

    3- この前も壊したばかりなのに!? (Kono mae mo kowashita bakari na noni!?)

    Her nephew, Yamato, uses an expression meaning - “You just broke (another) one recently!”
    Don’t you feel you want to slap cynical Yamato?! He seems to be a glass-half-full person.

    4- まさか会社のものではないよな・・・? (Masaka kaisha no mono de wa nai yo na…?)

    Her supervisor, Norio, uses an expression meaning - “It’s not a company phone, is it…?”
    Norio feels anxious about this accident and shows it with this question.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • ついに (tsui ni): “finally”
  • どこ (doko): “where”
  • なんで (nande): “why”
  • ショック (shokku): “shocking”
  • この前 (kono mae): “some time ago, recently”
  • 壊す (kowasu): “to break”
  • まさか (masaka): “by no means, never (used before a negation as an exclamation) “
  • 会社 (kaisha): “company, office”
  • If a friend posted something about having broken something by accident, which phrase would you use?

    So, now you know how to describe an accident in Japanese. Well done!

    7. Chat about Your Boredom on Social Media in Japanese

    Sometimes, we’re just bored with how life goes. And to alleviate the boredom, we write about it on social media. Add some excitement to your posts by addressing your friends and followers in Japanese!

    Mamoru gets bored at home, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Mamoru’s post.

    暇だなあ。つまんない。 (Hima da nā. Tsumannai.)
    “I have nothing to do. I’m so bored. ”

    1- 暇だなあ。 (Hima da nā.)

    First is an expression meaning: “I have nothing to do..”
    You can also use this expression when you want someone to ask you out but are too shy to directly say it.

    2- つまんない。 (Tsumannai.)

    Then comes the phrase - “I’m so bored..”
    This is the most common expression to say you’re bored in Japanese in a casual way. You can often hear teenagers use this phrase at school.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Mamoru’s friends leave some comments.

    1- 花見に行こうよ。 (Hanami ni ikō yo. )

    His high school friend, Yui, uses an expression meaning - “Let’s go to the cherry blossom viewing.”
    Yui makes an optimistic suggestion.

    2- 外で運動したらどうですか? (Soto de undō shitara dō desu ka?)

    His neighbor, Yūko, uses an expression meaning - “Why don’t you exercise outside?”
    And the neighbour makes a friendly suggestion.

    3- 新宿で飲もうぜ! (Shinjuku de nomō ze!)

    His college friend, Shō, uses an expression meaning - “Let’s drink in Shinjuku!”
    Use this expression to show you are feeling frivolous.

    4- 私も。。遊ばない? (Watashi mo.. Asobanai?)

    His girlfriend, Hazuki, uses an expression meaning - “Me too.. Wanna hang out?”
    Use this expression to show you are feeling empathy.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • 暇 (hima): “time to spare, free time”
  • つまんない (tsumannai): “casual expression of “I’m bored”"
  • 花見 (hanami): “cherry blossom viewing, flower viewing”
  • 外 (soto ): “outside”
  • 運動する (undō suru): “to exercise; V3″
  • 新宿 (Shinjuku): “Shinjuku, the prefectural capital of Tokyo “
  • 飲む (nomu): “to drink;V1″
  • 遊ぶ (asobu): “to hang out; V1″
  • If a friend posted something about being bored, which phrase would you use?

    Still bored? Share another feeling and see if you can start a conversation!

    8. Exhausted? Share It on Social Media in Japanese

    Sitting in public transport after work, feeling like chatting online? Well, converse in Japanese about how you feel, and let your friends join in!

    Hazuki feels exhausted after a long day at work, posts an image of herself looking tired, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Hazuki’s post.

    あー疲れた! (Ā tsukareta!)
    “Uh, I’m exhausted!”

    1- あー (Ā)

    First is an expression meaning “Uh.”
    This interjection is often used to express a sigh before you start a sentence. In casual settings like social media, it’s common for Japanese people to write interjections down as well as the actual context.

    2- 疲れた! (tsukareta!)

    Then comes the phrase - “I’m exhausted!.”
    This is one of the most commonly-used phrases in Japanese, both on and offline. You’re going to hear many people saying this phrase after work or school on the way back home.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Hazuki’s friends leave some comments.

    1- 今週は長かったな。。 (Konshū wa nagakatta na..)

    Her supervisor, Norio, uses an expression meaning - “This week felt longer..”
    Use this expression to show you are feeling empathy.

    2- お疲れさま! (Otsukare-sama!)

    Her boyfriend, Mamoru, uses an expression meaning - “Well done! ”
    But Hazuki’s boyfriend chooses to be encouraging in his comment.

    3- やっと花金だね。 (Yatto hanakin da ne.)

    Her college friend, Shō, uses an expression meaning - “Thank God it’s finally Friday!”
    Another post of commiseration and empathy.

    4- たまには休まないと。 (Tamani wa yasumanai to.)

    Her nephew, Yamato, uses an expression meaning - “You gotta get some rest. ”
    Yamato likes to state the obvious.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • 疲れる (tsukareru): “to tire, to get tired”
  • 今週 (konshū): “this week”
  • 長い (nagai): “long”
  • お疲れさま (otsukare-sama): “thank you, that’s enough for today, greeting at workplace”
  • やっと (yatto): “yay, finally, at last”
  • 花金 (hanakin): “Thank God it’s Friday. TGIF.”
  • たまに (tama ni ): “once in a while, occasionally”
  • 休む (yasumu): “to rest, to have a break”
  • If a friend posted something about being exhausted, which phrase would you use?

    Now you know how to say you’re exhausted in Japanese! Well done.

    9. Talking about an Injury in Japanese

    So life happens, and you managed to hurt yourself during a soccer game. Very Tweet-worthy! Here’s how to do it in Japanese.

    Mamoru suffers a painful injury, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Mamoru’s post.

    練習中に骨折。。痛い。 (Renshūchū ni kossetsu.. Itai.)
    “Broke my leg during practice.. It hurts.”

    1- 練習中に骨折。。 (Renshūchū ni kossetsu..)

    First is an expression meaning: “Broke my leg during the practice…”
    This is an example of an expression ending with a noun, which is often used in the headlines of newspaper articles or on TV news.

    2- 痛い。 (Itai.)

    Then comes the phrase - “It hurt.”
    This is a must-know phrase when you go to a dentist or any clinic in Japan. When something hurts, say this phrase out loud.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Mamoru’s friends leave some comments.

    1- 痛そう。お大事に。 (Itasō. O-daiji ni.)

    His neighbor, Yūko, uses an expression meaning - “Ouch. Get well soon.”
    Use this expression to show you are feeling warmhearted.

    2- うわ、グロいな。 (Uwa, guroi na.)

    His college friend, Shō, uses an expression meaning - “Holy smokes, gross.”
    This is an exclamation and an opinion all at once.

    3- すぐ治るといいね。 (Sugu naoru to ii ne.)

    His high school friend, Yui, uses an expression meaning - “Get well soon!”
    Use this expression to wish your injured friend well.

    4- 無理しないで、安静にするんだぞ。 (Muri shinai de, ansei ni suru n da zo.)

    His supervisor, Norio, uses an expression meaning - “Don’t strain yourself. Take a good rest.”
    This expression shows concern and caring.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • 練習中 (renshūchū): “during practice; in the middle of practice”
  • 骨折 (kossetsu): “bone fracture”
  • 痛い (itai): “painful, hurt”
  • お大事に (o-daiji ni): “Bless you, get well soon”
  • うわ (uwa): “Whoa, holy smokes, oh my gosh”
  • 治る (naoru): “to heal, to get cured”
  • 無理する (muri suru): “to take something too far, to overdo something”
  • 安静にする (ansei ni suru): “to rest, to be calm”
  • If a friend posted something about being injured, which phrase would you use?

    We love to share our fortunes and misfortunes; somehow that makes us feel connected to others.

    10. Starting a Conversation Feeling Disappointed in Japanese

    Sometimes things don’t go the way we planned. Share your disappointment about this with your friends!

    Hazuki feels disappointed about today’s weather, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Hazuki’s post.

    暑すぎる。。お願いだから、早く秋になって。 (Atsusugiru.. Onegai da kara, hayaku aki ni natte.)
    “It’s too hot today.. For God’s sake, turn to autumn already, please.”

    1- 暑すぎる。。 (Atsusugiru..)

    First is an expression meaning “It’s too hot…”
    Japanese people are not the biggest fans of sunlight. If you look at trendy Japanese magazines, you will see having light skin is often considered more attractive. Being tanned and brown as a chestnut is not as attractive as it is in many western countries. When you visit Japan in summer, you will see a lot of Japanese ladies with a sunshade and sunblock groves walking down the streets!

    2- お願いだから、早く秋になって。 (Onegai da kara, hayaku aki ni natte.)

    Then comes the phrase - “For God’s sake, turn to autumn already, please..”
    This Japanese expression for “for God’s sake” is frequently used when you are desperately in need of something. By writing this line at the beginning of a sentence, you can emphasize that you really need whatever follows.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Hazuki’s friends leave some comments.

    1- ほんと!湿気もすごい。 (Honto! Shikke mo sugoi.)

    Her neighbor, Yūko, uses an expression meaning - “I know right! Massive humidity, too.”
    This expression shows commiseration and empathy.

    2- 今日はスーツのジャケットは着られないな。 (Kyō wa sūtsu no jaketto wa kirarenai na.)

    Her supervisor, Norio, uses an expression meaning - “Today, I can’t wear a suit (anymore).”
    Norio agrees with the general sentiment that it’s a very hot day, sharing a personal detail about his preferred attire.

    3- これからもっと暑くなるらしいけどね。 (Kore kara motto atsuku naru rashii kedo ne.)

    Her nephew, Yamato, uses an expression meaning - “Looks like it’s going to get even hotter, though.”
    Trust Yamato to be the one who brings even worse news. He doesn’t seem like a very optimistic, positive person!

    4- 汗がとまらない。。 (Ase ga tomaranai..)

    Her boyfriend, Mamoru, uses an expression meaning - “I can’t stop sweating..”
    Hazuki’s boyfriend partakes in the conversation by sharing a personal detail.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • 暑い (atsui): “hot”
  • お願いだから (onegai da kara): “Come on, for God’s sake”
  • 秋 (aki): “fall, autumn”
  • 湿気 (shikke): “humidity”
  • 今日 (kyō): “today”
  • 着る (kiru): “to wear”
  • もっと (motto): “more”
  • とまる (tomaru): “stop”
  • How would you comment in Japanese when a friend is disappointed?

    Not all posts need to be about negative feelings and experiences, though!

    11. Talking about Your Relationship Status in Japanese

    Don’t just change your relationship status in Settings, talk about it!

    Mamoru changes his status to “In a relationship”, posts an image of him and Hazuki, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Mamoru’s post.

    今日で付き合って1ヶ月!ラブラブです。 (Kyō de tsukiatte ikkagetsu! Raburabu desu.)
    “Today is 1 month since we started dating. We’re in love.”

    1- 今日で付き合って1ヶ月! (Kyō de tsukiatte ikkagetsu!)

    First is an expression meaning: “Today is one month since we started dating!.”
    In Japan, you can often see couples counting the number of months they’ve been together for, then making it an anniversary and posting about it on social media.

    2- ラブラブです。 (Raburabu desu.)

    Then comes the phrase - “We’re in love.”
    Although there’s an expression meaning “lovey-dovey”, it’s not very common for Japanese people to show affection such as kissing and hugging in public. Never show too much affection in front of your Japanese girlfriend or boyfriend’s parents! Thismight get a little confusing and embarrassing.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Mamoru’s friends leave some comments.

    1- うそだ!! (Uso da!!)

    His college friend, Shō, uses an expression meaning - “No way!!”
    This is a playful and teasing phrase to make conversation.

    2- おめでとう!彼女かわいいね! (Omedetō! Kanojo kawaii ne!)

    His high school friend, Yui, uses an expression meaning - “Congrats! Your girlfriend is cute!”
    Here, Yui complements his friend on his girlfriend’s appearance.

    3- さて、いつまで続くかな? (Sate, itsu made tsuzuku ka na?)

    His girlfriend’s nephew, Yamato, uses an expression meaning - “Well, let’s see how long it lasts?”
    Don’t be the Yamato in any conversation…! Real wet blanket, hey?

    4- 職場恋愛か。。 (Shokuba ren’ai ka..)

    His supervisor, Norio, uses an expression meaning - “Office romance, huh..”
    Norio is expressing surprise over this relationship.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • 付き合う (tsukiau): “to keep company with, to go out with; V1″
  • ラブラブ (raburabu): “lovey-dovey”
  • おめでとう (omedetō): “Congrats”
  • 彼女 (kanojo): “girl, she, girlfriend”
  • かわいい (kawaii): “pretty, cute, lovely, charming :Adj(i)”
  • さて (sate): “Well, now, anyway”
  • 続く (tsuzuku): “to last, to be continued”
  • 職場恋愛 (shokuba ren’ai): “office romance”
  • What would you say in Japanese when a friend changes their relationship status?

    Being in a good relationship with someone special is good news - don’t be shy to spread it!

    12. Post about Getting Married in Japanese

    Wow, so things got serious, and you’re getting married. Congratulations! Or, your friend is getting married, so talk about this in Japanese.

    Hazuki is getting married today, so she eaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Hazuki’s post.

    いよいよ結婚式です。ドキドキ。 (Iyoiyo kekkonshiki desu. Dokidoki.)
    “Finally getting married. Nervous and excited.”

    1- いよいよ結婚式です。 (Iyoiyo kekkonshiki desu.)

    First is an expression meaning “Finally getting married.”
    In Japan, there are two common types of weddings: one is western style with a church ceremony, and the other is Japanese traditional style where the celebration is proceeded in a shrine. Note that a western style wedding at a church doesn’t necessarily mean the couple is Christian. A lot of non-Christian Japanese people prefer to have a wedding at a church.

    2- ドキドキ。 (Dokidoki.)

    Then comes the phrase - “Nervous and excited.”
    This expression can show both excited and nervous feelings at the same time. It’s commonly used to describe feelings before an important event.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Hazuki’s friends leave some comments.

    1- おめでとうございます。末永くお幸せに! (Omedetō gozaimasu. Suenagaku o-shiawase ni! )

    Her supervisor, Norio, uses an expression meaning - “Congratulations. Have a long and loving life together!”
    What a warm-hearted, positive wish!

    2- おめでとう!あとでブーケは私に投げてね。 (Omedetō! Ato de būke wa watashi ni nagete ne.)

    Her high school friend, Manami, uses an expression meaning - “Congrats! Throw the bouquet to me later, will ya?”
    Manami is being the clown and wants Hazuki to throw her the hand bouquet. In many wedding traditions, when you catch the bride’s hand bouquet, it means you’re getting married next.

    3- 結婚?!全然知らなかった。。 (Kekkon?! Zenzen shiranakatta.. )

    Her college friend, Shō, uses an expression meaning - “Getting married?! I had no idea.. ”
    Use this expression to show you are feeling surprised.

    4- 守は幸せ者だねー! (Mamoru wa shiawasemono da nē!)

    Her husband’s high school friend, Yui, uses an expression meaning - “Mamoru is one lucky guy! ”
    Basically, Yui is giving the bridegroom a compliment with this expression. He thinks Hazuki is a very fine bride, and expresses his appreciation this way.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • いよいよ (iyoiyo): “finally, more and more”
  • 結婚式 (kekkonshiki): “wedding ceremony”
  • ドキドキ (dokidoki): “excited and nervous”
  • おめでとうございます (omedetō gozaimasu): “Congratulations”
  • 末永く (suenagaku): “For many years to come”
  • おめでとう (omedetō): “Congrats”
  • 投げる (nageru): “to throw”
  • 幸せ者 (shiawasemono): “lucky guy, person”
  • How would you respond in Japanese to a friend’s post about getting married?

    For the next topic, fast forward about a year into the future after the marriage…

    13. Announcing Big News in Japanese

    Wow, huge stuff is happening in your life! Announce it in Japanese.

    Mamoru finds out he and his wife are going to have a baby, posts an image of his pregnant wife, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Mamoru’s post.

    来年パパになります。早く会いたいな。 (Rainen papa ni narimasu. Hayaku aitai na.)
    “I’ll be a dad next year. Wanna see the baby sooner.”

    1- 来年パパになります。 (Rainen papa ni narimasu.)

    First is an expression meaning “I’ll be dad next year..”
    This is a common, simple line to use when you just found out you’re becoming a father and want to let the world know. InJapan, it’s tradition to use this only before you have your first child.

    2- 早く会いたいな。 (Hayaku aitai na.)

    Then comes the phrase - “I want to see him sooner.”
    In Japanese, we don’t have an exact translation for “I miss you” or “Can’t wait” that sounds natural. Instead, we say “I want to see (you) sooner” in Japanese. If you’re in a long-distance relationship with a Japanese partner, you could also use this expression as a way to say you miss a person.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Mamoru’s friends leave some comments.

    1- おめでとう!!楽しみだね! (Omedetō!! Tanoshimi da ne!)

    His high school friend, Yui, uses an expression meaning - “Congrats!! Isn’t that exciting!”
    Use this expression to show you are feeling optimistic.

    2- やったー、新しいいとこが増える! (Yattā, atarashii itoko ga fueru!)

    His wife’s nephew, Yamato, uses an expression meaning - “Yay, a new cousin will be added!”
    For a change, Yamato is really happy.

    3- 女の子?男の子? (Onnanoko? Otokonoko?)

    His college friend, Shō, uses an expression meaning - “Girl or boy?”
    Shō wants to know details!

    4- いろいろ準備しないとね。 (Iroiro junbi shinai to ne.)

    His wife, Hazuki, uses an expression meaning - “Gotta prepare a lot of stuff.”
    Hazuki shows a realistic view of the matter, as she knows a lot of work is lying ahead of them.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • 来年 (rainen): “next year”
  • 早く (hayaku): “fast, quickly, soon”
  • 会う (au): “to meet; V1″
  • 楽しみ (tanoshimi): “fun, excitement”
  • 新しい (atarashii): “new ;-i adjective”
  • いとこ (itoko): “cousin”
  • 増える (fueru): “to increase”
  • 準備する (junbi suru): “to prepare”
  • Which phrase would you choose when a friend announces their pregnancy on social media?

    So, talking about a pregnancy will get you a lot of traction on social media. But wait till you see the responses to babies!

    14. Posting Japanese Comments about Your Baby

    Your bundle of joy is here, and you cannot keep quiet about it! Share your thoughts in Japanese.

    Hazuki plays with her baby, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Hazuki’s post.

    新しい家族が増えました。ゆきこと言います。 (Atarashii kazoku ga fuemashita. Yukiko to iimasu.)
    “One new family member is added. She’s named Yukiko.”

    1- 新しい家族が増えました。 (Atarashii kazoku ga fuemashita.)

    First is an expression meaning: “One new family member is added.”
    It’s almost like a must-do thing for Japanese couples to post a baby picture when they first give birth to one. This expression is one of the most common lines to use when you share the news of having a baby on social media. It is simple yet it is cute, and heartwarming.

    2- ゆきこと言います。 (Yukiko to iimasu.)

    Then comes the phrase - “She’s named Yukiko.”
    A lot of Japanese people include the name of the new born baby in a post. Sometimes they also explain the origin of the name and the meaning of the chosen characters (kanji).

    COMMENTS

    In response, Hazuki’s friends leave some comments.

    1- かわいすぎる〜!手も小さい。。 (Kawaisugirū! Te mo chiisai..)

    Her high school friend, Manami, uses an expression meaning - “Too cute! Her hand is tiny too..”
    Use this expression to show you are feeling excited.

    2- よく頑張ったな。おめでとう。 (Yoku ganbatta na. Omedetō.)

    Her college friend, Shō, uses an expression meaning - “Great job. Congrats. ”
    A warm-hearted compliment and congratulation.

    3- ゆきこに早く会わせて〜! (Yukiko ni hayaku awasetē!)

    Her nephew, Yamato, uses an expression meaning - “Let me see Yukiko soon!”
    Yamato is keen to meet his new cousin.

    4- ご出産おめでとう。元気そうな赤ちゃんで何より。 (Go-shussan omedetō. Genki sō na aka-chan de nani yori.)

    Her supervisor, Norio, uses an expression meaning - “Congratulations on her birth. I can’t be any happier that she looks like a healthy baby.”
    Norio is sharing warmhearted congratulations and feelings about the baby.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • 家族 (kazoku): “family”
  • と言います (to iimasu): “to be named”
  • 手 (te): “hand”
  • 早く (hayaku): “soon”
  • 出産 (shussan): “birth”
  • 元気な (genki na): “healthy, fine, good”
  • 赤ちゃん (aka-chan): “baby”
  • 何より (nani yori): “more than anything”
  • If your friend is the mother or father, which phrase would you use on social media?

    Congratulations, you know the basics of chatting about a baby in Japanese! But we’re not done with families yet…

    15. Japanese Comments about a Family Reunion

    Family reunions - some you love, some you hate. Share about it on your feed.

    Mamoru attends a family gathering, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Mamoru’s post.

    久しぶりに親戚の集まり。甥っ子が大きくなってる。。 (Hisashiburi ni shinseki no atsumari. Oikko ga ōkiku natte ru..)
    “Family gathering for the first time in forever. My nephew has gotten big..”

    1- 久しぶりに親戚の集まり。 (Hisashiburi ni shinseki no atsumari.)

    First is an expression meaning “Family gathering for the first time in forever.”
    This Japanese expression for “for the first time in forever” can be used when you did something that hasn’t been done in ages. Japanese people get together with families usually on New Year’s and Bon Festival holidays in August. When they gather, they usually eat a lot and drink a lot just like many families in other countries do.

    2- 甥っ子が大きくなってる。。 (Oikko ga ōkiku natte ru..)

    Then comes the phrase - “My nephew has gotten (all) big..”
    One of the things you’d often comment at the family gathering is how your nephew or younger family members who were small before grew a lot bigger now. You can replace “nephew” with another word to refer to other family members or guests.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Mamoru’s friends leave some comments.

    1- 次会うときにはもう大人になってるかもね。 (Tsugi au toki ni wa mō otona ni natte ru kamo ne.)

    His wife, Hazuki, uses an expression meaning - “He might be all grown up the next time we see him.”
    Use this expression to show you are feeling sensitive.

    2- 懐かしいな。みなさん元気? (Natsukashii na. Mina-san genki?)

    His high school friend, Yui, uses an expression meaning - “Nostalgic. How are you all?”
    Use this expression to share your feelings of nostalgia.

    3- 大家族ね! (Daikazoku ne!)

    His neighbor, Yūko, uses an expression meaning - “What a big family!”
    Yūko is expressing surprise and, perhaps, appreciation for the size of the family.

    4- お母さん全然変わってないな。 (O-kā-san zenzen kawatte nai na.)

    His college friend, Shō, uses an expression meaning - “Your mom hasn’t changed at all.”
    This is a warm-hearted compliment to Hazuki’s mother and the way she looks.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • 久しぶりに (Hisashiburi ni): “for the first time in forever”
  • 親戚 (shinseki): “relative”
  • 集まり (atsumari): “gathering”
  • 甥っ子 (oikko): “nephew”
  • 大人 (otona): “adult”
  • 大家族 (daikazoku): “big family”
  • お母さん (o-kā-san): “mother”
  • 変わる (kawaru): “to change”
  • Which phrase is your favorite to comment on a friend’s photo about a family reunion?

    16. Post about Your Travel Plans in Japanese

    So, Hazuki is going on holiday. Do you know how to post and leave comments in Japanese about being at the airport, waiting for a flight?

    Hazuki waits at the airport for her flight, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Hazuki’s post.

    これからタイに行ってきまーす! (Kore kara Tai ni ittekimāsu!)
    “Off to Thailand now!”

    1- これから (Kore kara )

    First is an expression meaning “(from) now.”
    Add this expression at the beginning of a sentence when you want to indicate that you’re about to do something.

    2- タイに行ってきまーす! (Tai ni ittekimāsu!)

    Then comes the phrase - “off to Thailand!.”
    This is a common expression to use when you’re on your way to somewhere to do something. Japanese people on social media often write this line before they go on a trip.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Hazuki’s friends leave some comments.

    1- いいなあ。本場のタイ料理楽しんでね。 (Ii nā. Honba no Tai ryōri tanoshinde ne.)

    Her neighbor, Yūko, uses an expression meaning - “Jealous. Enjoy the authentic Thai food.”
    Yūko wishes to be in Hazuki’s shoes - a warmhearted comment.

    2- お土産よろしく! (O-miyage yoroshiku!)

    Her college friend, Shō, uses an expression meaning - “I’m expecting a souvenir!”
    Making conversation, Shō pretends to be a demanding friend.

    3- いつまで?私も来週行くよ。 (Itsu made? Watashi mo raishū iku yo.)

    Her high school friend, Manami, uses an expression meaning - “Until when? I’m going next week.”
    Here, Manami is sharing information about her own travels that could mean a meet-up with Hazuki in Thailand.

    4- 楽しんでね! (Tanoshinde ne!)

    Her husband’s high school friend, Yui, uses an expression meaning - “Have fun!”
    A common well-wish.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • これから (kore kara): “from now”
  • タイ (Tai): “Thailand”
  • に行ってきます (ni ittekimasu): “off to …”
  • 本場 (honba): “home, best place”
  • 料理 (ryōri): “food as in dishes, cuisine”
  • 楽しむ (tanoshimu): “to enjoy oneself; V1″
  • お土産 (o-miyage): “souvenir”
  • 来週 (raishū): “next week”
  • Choose and memorize your best airport phrase in Japanese!

    Hopefully the rest of the trip is better!

    17. Posting about an Interesting Find in Japanese

    So maybe you’re strolling around at your local market, and find something interesting. Here are some handy Japanese phrases!

    Mamoru finds an unusual item at a local market, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Mamoru’s post.

    何だこりゃ。初めて見た。 (Nan da korya. Hajimete mita.)
    “What the –. Never seen this before.”

    1- 何だこりゃ。 (Nan da korya.)

    First is an expression meaning “What the –?.”
    This is a common reaction when you see something confusing or surprising. When you find something completely new and interesting overseas, you’ll probably get to use this comment.

    2- 初めて見た。 (Hajimete mita.)

    Then comes the phrase - “Never seen this before.”
    This is a simple and short expression to use when you find something you have never seen.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Mamoru’s friends leave some comments.

    1- タイ限定だね。 (Tai gentei da ne.)

    His college friend, Shō, uses an expression meaning - “Only in Thailand.”
    This indicates that Thailand has strange customs or people.

    2- ショッキングな外見だね。 (Shokkingu na gaiken da ne.)

    His high school friend, Yui, uses an expression meaning - “What a shocking look.” This phrase refers to something that looks shocking to the observer, and not a “fashion look”!
    Expressing surprise, Yuki shares her opinion to keep the conversation going.

    3- あ、これ流行ってるって聞いた。 (A, kore hayatte ru tte kiita.)

    His wife’s high school friend, Manami, uses an expression meaning - “Oh, I heard it’s a thing now.”
    Manami shows she’s up to date with the latest trends.

    4- 欲しい!! (Hoshii!!)

    His nephew, Yamato, uses an expression meaning - “I want it!!”
    Yamato clearly likes what he sees.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • こりゃ (korya): “term derived from これは meaning “this is”"
  • 初めて (hajimete): “first time”
  • 見る (miru): “to see, to watch, to look ; V2″
  • 限定 (gentei): “limit, restriction”
  • ショッキングな (shokkingu na): “shocking”
  • 外見 (gaiken): “look”
  • 流行る (hayaru): “to be popular”
  • 欲しい (hoshii): “want, to want”
  • Which phrase would you use to comment on a friend’s interesting discovery?

    Perhaps you will even learn the identity of your find! Or perhaps you’re on holiday, and visiting interesting places…

    18. Post about a Sightseeing Trip in Japanese

    Let your friends know what you’re up to in Japanese, especially when visiting a remarkable place! Don’t forget the photo.

    Hazuki visits a famous landmark, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Hazuki’s post.

    世界遺産に到着!観光客だらけだ。。 (Sekai isan ni tōchaku! Kankōkyaku darake da..)
    “Arrived at the World Heritage! So many tourists..”

    1- 世界遺産に到着! (Sekai isan ni tōchaku! )

    First is an expression meaning “Arrived at the world heritage!”
    This is a common expression to use when you arrive somewhere and want to post about it. You can replace the Japanese word for “world heritage” with any other place, for example, schools, meeting place, etc.

    2- 観光客だらけだ。。 (Kankōkyaku darake da..)

    Then comes the phrase - “So many tourists..”
    When you visit Japan, especially in big cities like Tokyo, a lot of places you go to will probably be crowded. To get on a train also, you often have to throw yourself into crowds. When this happens, you can use this expression, replacing the word “tourists” with something else, for example, “students” or “workers”.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Hazuki’s friends leave some comments.

    1- いい景色だね。 (Ii keshiki da ne.)

    Her neighbor, Yūko, uses an expression meaning - “Nice view. ”
    This comment is used to make conversation and showing interest.

    2- わーおれもここ行ったことある! (Wā ore mo koko itta koto aru!)

    Her college friend, Shō, uses an expression meaning - “Oh I’ve been there too!”
    Sharing experiences is a great way to bond on social media.

    3- 夏休みだから、しょうがないよ。 (Natsuyasumi da kara, shōganai yo.)

    Her husband’s nephew, Yamato, uses an expression meaning - “It’s during summer break, so it can’t be helped.”
    Yamato adds a dash of realism again with this explanation, fortunately not too negative or cynical.

    4- もっと写真見たい! (Motto shashin mitai!)

    Her high school friend, Manami, uses an expression meaning - “Show us more photos!”
    Manami shows she is curious and wants more details about Hazuki’s experience.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • 世界遺産 (sekai isan): “World Heritage site”
  • 到着 (tōchaku): “arrive, arrival”
  • 観光客 (kankōkyaku): “tourist”
  • 景色 (keshiki): “scenery, view”
  • 行く (iku): “to go”
  • 夏休み (natsuyasumi): “summer vacation”
  • しょうがない (shōganai): “can’t be helped”
  • 写真 (shashin): “photograph”
  • Which phrase would you prefer when a friend posts about a famous landmark?

    Share your special places with the world. Or simply post about your relaxing experiences.

    19. Post about Relaxing Somewhere in Japanese

    So you’re doing nothing, yet you enjoy that too? Tell your social media friends about it in Japanese!

    Mamoru relaxes at a beautiful place, posts a chilled selfie, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Mamoru’s post.

    波の音、青い海、冷たいカクテル。最高! (Nami no oto, aoi umi, tsumetai kakuteru. Saikō!)
    “The sound of the waves, the blue sea and the cold drinks. The best!”

    1- 波の音、青い海、冷たいカクテル。 (Nami no oto, aoi umi, tsumetai kakuteru.)

    First is an expression meaning “The sound of the waves, the blue sea and the cold cocktails..”
    This is a poetic description of the situation, which is done by paralleling the key factors in short words. This expression method is often used in advertisements as well. It’s a simple and easy way to catch people’s attention.

    2- 最高! (Saikō!)

    Then comes the phrase - “The best!.”
    This literally means “the best,” and Japanese people often use this expression on social media to emphasize that something is great.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Mamoru’s friends leave some comments.

    1- うらやましいぞー。 (Urayamashii zō.)

    His supervisor, Norio, uses an expression meaning - “Jealous.”
    Use this expression to show you are feeling envious.

    2- すごい海きれい! (Sugoi umi kirei!)

    His wife’s high school friend, Manami, uses an expression meaning - “Amazingly beautiful sea!”
    Manami leaves a positive opinion about the setting Hazuki finds herself in.

    3- 飲んでばかりいないで、泳ぎなよ。 (Nonde bakari inaide, oyogina yo.)

    Mamoru’s nephew, Yamato, uses an expression meaning - “Don’t just drink, go swimming.”
    Yamato has his own idea of what Hazuki should be doing.

    4- 焼けて帰ってくるんだろうな。。 (Yakete kaette kuru n darō na..)

    His college friend, Shō, uses an expression meaning - “I bet you guys are coming back all tanned.”
    Shō is making conversation with this comment.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • 波 (nami): “wave”
  • 音 (oto): “sound, noise”
  • 青い (aoi): “blue, green, pale; Adj(i)”
  • 海 (umi): “sea, ocean”
  • 冷たい (tsumetai): “cold;Adj(i)”
  • うらやましい (urayamashii): “envious”
  • 泳ぐ (oyogu): “to swim”
  • 焼ける (yakeru): “to get a suntan;V2″
  • Which phrase would you use to comment a friend’s feed?

    The break was great, but now it’s time to return home.

    20. What to Say in Japanese When You’re Home Again

    And you’re back! What will you share with friends and followers?

    Hazuki returns home after the vacation, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Hazuki’s post.

    あーあ、帰って来ちゃった。 (Āa, kaette kichatta.)
    “Oh well, I’m back again.”

    1- あーあ (Āa)

    First is an expression meaning “Oh well.”
    This is an interjection that describes a sigh of boredom or disappointment.

    2- 帰って来ちゃった (kaette kichatta)

    Then comes the phrase - “I’m back again.”
    Japanese people love to travel, even during the short breaks such as a day off. When they’re back home, this expression is often used to show sadness that the adventure is over.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Hazuki’s friends leave some comments.

    1- おかえりなさい。 (Okaerinasai.)

    Her neighbor, Yūko, uses an expression meaning - “Welcome back. ”
    A friendly, common greeting.

    2- おみやげ楽しみだな。。 (O-miyage tanoshimi da na..)

    Her college friend, Shō, uses an expression meaning - “Can’t wait to see the souvenirs..”
    Sharing a need to see brought back from travels is a good conversation starter.

    3- 焼けた?写真見たい! (Yaketa? Shashin mitai!)

    Her high school friend, Manami, uses an expression meaning - “Sunburnt? Wanna see the photos!”
    Manami is making conversation by asking a question, and also expressing a need.

    4- 東京は寒いでしょ〜。 (Tōkyō wa samui deshō.)

    Her husband’s high school friend, Yui, uses an expression meaning - “Tokyo feels so cold to you.”
    Yui is suggesting that Tokyo’s weather must be a big change from Thailand’s.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • あーあ (āa): “oh well”
  • 帰って来る (kaette kuru): “to return, to come back”
  • おかえりなさい (okaerinasai): “Welcome back, welcome home”
  • おみやげ (o-miyage): “a small gift, a souvenir”
  • 焼ける (yakeru): “to get sunburned”
  • 見る (miru): “to take a look”
  • 東京 (Tōkyō): “Tokyo, the capital of Japan”
  • 寒い (samui): “cold”
  • How would you welcome a friend back from a trip?

    What would you post on social media regarding an event such as Hazuki’s nephew’s Coming of Age Day?

    21. It’s Time to Celebrate in Japanese

    For Yamato and his family, this is an important day and you wish to post something about it on social media. What would you say?

    Hazuki celebrates his nephew’s Coming-of-Age Day, posts an image of the event, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Mamoru’s post.

    甥っ子、成人おめでとう!飲みすぎには注意だぞ。 (Oikko, seijin omedetō! Nomisugi ni wa chūi da zo.)
    “Congrats on the Coming-of-Age day, my nephew! Be careful not to drink too much. ”

    1- 甥っ子、成人おめでとう! (Oikko, seijin omedetō! )

    First is an expression meaning “Congrats on the Coming-of-Age day, my nephew!”
    On Coming-of-Age Day, not only the new adults, but many other people also post a message congratulating “the new adults” on social media. On this day, many new adults, often dressed in Japanese traditional clothes, go to a ceremony in their neighborhood with the friends they grew up with.

    2- 飲みすぎには注意だぞ。 (Nomisugi ni wa chūi da zo.)

    Then comes the phrase - “Be careful not to drink too much.”
    It’s not unusual for young people to drink too much and make mistakes during any big celebration. But especially on Coming-of-Age day in Japan, some new adults go too wild. For this reason, it’s common for older adults to warn them about drinking, as well as congratulate them on their growing up.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Mamoru’s friends leave some comments.

    1- 気をつけまーす! (Ki o tsukemāsu!)

    Hazuki’s nephew, Yamato, uses an expression meaning - “I’ll be careful!”
    Yamato shows good intentions with this comment.

    2- もうハタチ?!この前まで小さかったのに。。 (Mō hatachi?! Kono mae made chiisakatta noni..)

    His high school friend, Yui, uses an expression meaning - “Already the 20th? He was so small not very long ago..”
    A common comment on how fast someone young has grown.

    3- おめでとう!いよいよ大人への仲間入りね。 (Omedetō! Iyoiyo otona e no nakamairi ne.)

    His wife’s high school friend, Manami, uses an expression meaning - “Congrats! He’s finally joined adulthood.”
    An optimistic, positive congratulation on this big day.

    4- 甥っ子さん、成人おめでとう!すっかり大人びて、見違えたな。 (Oikko-san, seijin omedetō! Sukkari otonabite, michigaeta na.)

    His supervisor, Norio, uses an expression meaning - “Congrats to your nephew! He’s so grown up that I could hardly recognize him.”
    In the same vein as the previous comments, people are expressing surprise at how big Yamato has grown.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • 甥っ子 (oikko): “nephew”
  • 成人 (seijin): “adult, coming-of-age”
  • 飲みすぎ (nomisugi): “overdrinking, excessive drinking”
  • 注意 (chūi): “caution, attention”
  • ハタチ (hatachi): “twenty-years old”
  • 仲間入り (nakamairi): “joining a group”
  • 大人びる (otonabiru): “to become grown-up”
  • 見違える (michigaeru): “to be beyond recognition”
  • If a friend posted something about a special day in their lives, which phrase would you use?

    Someone’s Coming of Age Day and public commemoration days are not the only special ones to remember!

    22. Posting about a Birthday on Social Media in Japanese

    Your friend or you are celebrating your birthday in an unexpected way. Be sure to share this on social media!

    Hazuki attends her own birthday party, posts an image of the event, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Hazuki’s post.

    今までで最高の誕生日だった! (Ima made de saikō no tanjōbi datta! )
    “The best birthday ever! ”

    1- 今までで最高の (Ima made de saikō no)

    First is an expression meaning “The best ever.”
    If you want to say that something is the best you ever had, you can add this expression before the noun you are referring to.

    2- 誕生日だった! (tanjōbi datta!)

    Then comes the phrase - “It was a birthday!”
    It’s common to get together with your friends by renting a space at a restaurant and celebrating your birthday in Japan. You’ll have a lot of good deals on your birthday, so make sure to check if they have any birthday deals before you book somewhere!

    COMMENTS

    In response, Hazuki’s friends leave some comments.

    1- 遅くなったけど、誕生日おめでとう! (Osoku natta kedo, tanjōbi omedetō!)

    Her college friend, Shō, uses an expression meaning - “It’s a bit late, but happy birthday!”
    Use this expression to show you are feeling frivolous.

    2- おめでとう。素敵な1年になりますように。 (Omedetō. Suteki na ichi-nen ni narimasu yō ni.)

    Her supervisor, Norio, uses an expression meaning - “Happy birthday. Hope you have a great year ahead.”
    This is a warmhearted, friendly well-wish.

    3- いい写真だね! (Ii shashin da ne!)

    Her high school friend, Manami, uses an expression meaning - “Nice pic!”
    Manami is complimenting Hazuki’s photographic skills.

    4- 私もお祝いに行きたかったな~。 (Watashi mo o-iwai ni ikitakatta nā.)

    Her husband’s high school friend, Yui, uses an expression meaning - “Wish I could have come to celebrate, too.”
    This friend is cleary feeling disappointed that he couldn’t attend.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • 今までで (ima made de): “so far, ever”
  • 最高 (saikō): “best”
  • 誕生日 (tanjōbi): “birthday”
  • 遅い (osoi): “late, slow”
  • 誕生日おめでとう (tanjōbi omedetō): “Happy birthday (casual expression)”
  • 素敵な (suteki na): “fabulous, excellent, fantastic”
  • 年 (nen): “counter for years”
  • 祝う (iwau): “to celebrate”
  • If a friend posted something about birthday greetings, which phrase would you use?

    23. Talking about New Year on Social Media in Japanese

    Impress your friend with your Japanese New Year’s wishes this year. Learn the phrases easily!

    Mamoru celebrates the New Year, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Mamoru’s post.

    あけましておめでとうございます!今年もよろしくお願いします。 (Akemashite omedetō gozaimasu! Kotoshi mo yoroshiku onegai shimasu.)
    “Happy New Year. May this year be another good one for us.”

    1- あけましておめでとうございます! (Akemashite omedetō gozaimasu! )

    First is an expression meaning “Happy New Year!”
    When you want to use Japanese New Year’s greetings, this phrase must be top of the list. Regardless of age and sex, Japanese speakers usually use this line to say “happy new year”.

    2- 今年もよろしくお願いします。 (Kotoshi mo yoroshiku onegai shimasu.)

    Then comes the phrase - “May this year be another good one for us.”
    It’s also common to use this wish for the new year. It’s a must-know expression when you greet someone in the new year. Even if New Year’s has past and you’re seeing someone for the first time, it’s polite to give this expression.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Mamoru’s friends leave some comments.

    1- あけおめ! (Akeome!)

    Hazuki’s nephew, Yamato, uses an expression meaning - “Happy New Year! ”
    A common wish for New Year.

    2- あけましておめでとう。新年会楽しみにしてるね。 (Akemashite omedetō. Shinnenkai tanoshimi ni shite ru ne.)

    His high school friend, Yui, uses an expression meaning - “Happy New Year. Looking forward to the new year party. ”
    Yui is expressing how he feels about the party.

    3- 明日初詣行こうぜ。 (Ashita hatsumōde ikō ze.)

    His college friend, Shō, uses an expression meaning - “Let’s make the first visit to a shrine tomorrow.”
    Making a suggestion is a good way to keep a conversation flowing.

    4- 去年も早かったなー。 (Kyonen mo hayakatta nā. )

    His supervisor, Norio, uses an expression meaning - “Last year went pretty quick (again).”
    Norio is a bit nostalgic again, commenting on how fast time flies.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • あけましておめでとうございます。 (Akemashite omedetō gozaimasu.): “Happy New Year. (formal)”
  • 今年 (kotoshi): “this year”
  • よろしくお願いします (yoroshiku onegai shimasu): “Best wishes”, “Nice to meet you”
  • あけおめ (akeome): “Shortened version of “happy New Year.” Used between friends.”
  • 新年会 (shinnenkai): “New Year’s party”
  • 楽しみにしている (tanoshimi ni shite iru): “to be looking forward to”
  • 初詣 (hatsumōde): “The first visit to a shrine in the new year, a traditional custom in Japan”
  • 早い (hayai): “early”
  • Which is your favorite phrase to post on social media during New Year?

    But before New Year’s Day comes another important day…

    24. What to Post on Christmas Day in Japanese

    What will you say in Japanese about Christmas?

    Hazuki celebrates Christmas with her family, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Hazuki’s post.

    メリークリスマス!旦那とイルミネーションを見に行ってきます。 (Merī Kurisumasu! Danna to iruminēshon o mi ni itte kimasu.)
    “Merry Christmas! Off to see some illuminations with my husband. ” The “illuminations” refered to here are Christmas lights.

    1- メリークリスマス! (Merī Kurisumasu! )

    First is an expression meaning: “Merry Christmas!”
    Because so few people in Japan are Christians, Christmas is not celebrated as it is in western countries. However, we do give greetings, decorate our houses a bit Christmas-y, exchange gifts and so on. It’s also more common to celebrate the holiday on Christmas Eve rather than Christmas Day. Also, we don’t have any Christmas holidays.

    2- 旦那とイルミネーションを見に行ってきます。 (Danna to iruminēshon o mi ni itte kimasu.)

    Then comes the phrase - “Off to see some illuminations with my husband.”
    Compared to western countries, it is rare to find someone who thinks of Christmas as a family event in Japan. Christmas in Japan is more of a romantic event for couples or a day to get your child a gift than to spend time with your family. For couples, going to see illuminations is a popular thing to do.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Hazuki’s friends leave some comments.

    1- どこもカップルばっかり!! (Doko mo kappuru bakkari!!)

    Her high school friend, Manami, uses an expression meaning - “Couples everywhere!!”
    Post an opinion to keep your social media friends informed.

    2- 今夜はホワイトクリスマスだね。 (Kon’ya wa howaito kurisumasu da ne.)

    Her neighbor, Yūko, uses an expression meaning - “Tonight is the white Christmas.”
    Another comment that will be suitable on a social media feed during this time.

    3- 俺は今年もクリスマスは仕事です。。彼女ほしい。 (Ore wa kotoshi mo kurisumasu wa shigoto desu.. Kanojo hoshii.)

    Her college friend, Shō, uses an expression meaning - “Working this Christmas as usual. I want a girl
    friend. ”
    As said, it’s not common to celebrate Christmas, but Shō seems envious, doesn’t he? He’d have liked to have romantic partner to go out with on this day.

    4- メリクリ!今年も1年早かったわ〜。 (Merikuri! Kotoshi mo ichi-nen hayakatta wā.)

    Her husband’s high school friend, Yui, uses an expression meaning - “Merry Christmas! This year went pretty quick for me.”
    Another comment about time.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • メリークリスマス (Merī Kurisumasu): “Merry Christmas”
  • イルミネーション (iruminēshon): “illuminations, lights”
  • 見に行く (mi ni iku): “go to watch”
  • カップル (kappuru): “couple”
  • ホワイトクリスマス (howaito kurisumasu): “white Christmas”
  • 彼女 (kanojo): “girl, she, girlfriend”
  • 仕事 (shigoto): “work, job”
  • メリクリ (merikuri): “Shortened version of “Merry Christmas.” Used between friends.”
  • If a friend posted something about Christmas greetings, which phrase would you use?

    So, the festive season is over! Yet, there will always be other days, besides a birthday, to wish someone well.

    25. Post about Your Anniversary in Japanese

    Some things deserve to be celebrated, like wedding anniversaries. Learn which Japanese phrases are meaningful and best suited for this purpose!

    Mamoru celebrates his wedding anniversary with his wife, posts an image of them, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Mamoru’s post.

    初めての結婚記念日ディナー! (Hajimete no kekkon kinenbi dinā!)
    “Wedding anniversary dinner for the first time!”

    1- 初めての (Hajimete no )

    First is an expression meaning “for the first time.”
    When you want to post something you’ve done for the first time, you can add this expression at the beginning.

    2- 結婚記念日ディナー! (kekkon kinenbi dinā!)

    Then comes the phrase - “wedding anniversary dinner!”
    Like in many western countries, it’s common for couples to celebrate wedding anniversaries in Japan. The 25th anniversary is also called the “Silver anniversary,” and the 50th anniversary is called the “Golden anniversary.”

    COMMENTS

    In response, Mamoru’s friends leave some comments.

    1- ラブラブ! (Raburabu!)

    His wife’s high school friend, Manami, uses an expression meaning - “Lovey-dovey!”
    Manami posts something humorous and teasing.

    2- 夫婦円満の秘訣は? (Fūfu enman no hiketsu wa?)

    His college friend, Shō, uses an expression meaning - “What’s your secret to maintaining a harmonious marriage?”
    The single guy is curious how they manage to maintain a good marriage.

    3- 理想の夫婦だね。 (Risō no fūfu da ne.)

    His high school friend, Yui, uses an expression meaning - “Ideal couple.”
    Complimenting them, Yui leaves a positive post.

    4- 今日だけは、けんかしないように。 (Kyō dake wa, kenka shinai yō ni.)

    The nephew, Yamato, uses an expression meaning - “Just for today, try not to fight.”
    Yamato is being a bit of a wise-nose again, or he’s trying to be funny!

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • 初めての (hajimete no): “for the first time “
  • 結婚記念日 (kekkon kinenbi): “wedding anniversary”
  • ディナー (dinā): “dinner”
  • 夫婦 (fūfu): “married couple”
  • 夫婦円満 (fūfu enman): “harmonious marriage”
  • 秘訣 (hiketsu): “secret, trick”
  • 理想 (risō): “ideal, dream”
  • けんかする (kenka suru): “to fight”
  • If a friend posted something about Anniversary greetings, which phrase would you use?

    Conclusion

    Learning to speak a new language will always be easier once you know key phrases that everybody uses. These would include commonly-used expressions for congratulations and best wishes, etc.

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    Seijin No Hi: Celebrate Japanese Coming of Age Day in Japan

    Learning about the different holidays in Japan is a great step in better understanding Japan’s culture. This is because Japanese holidays and traditions offer both insight into the country’s past and values, as well as opportunities to learn the language itself more efficiently. (Because context can mean everything!)

    In particular, Coming of Age Day in Japan holds great value to the country’s youth and elderly alike. This is a day to celebrate all of those Japanese youth who have turned 20 years old, Japan’s legal age of adulthood.

    In addition to celebrating this momentous occasion in every Japanese adult’s life, this day is also designed to encourage them to be the best adults they can be.

    Despite the fact that what was once one of the most popular Japanese holidays is losing momentum, many people still hold to this holiday’s traditions in Japan.

    Learn more about this monumental day in the lives of young Japanese adults, including vocabulary and information about the Coming of Age Ceremony in Japan, with JapanesePod101.com.

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    1. Why Should You Know About Coming of Age Day?

    Coming of Age Day in Japan is an exciting day for the country’s youth, and is celebrated throughout Japan. This day is a reflection of Japan’s culture in that it promotes the wellbeing and success of those who have officially become adults.

    The passage from childhood to adulthood is important in Japanese culture (as it is around the world!), and in Japan this happens at the age of 20. As one of the most significant public holidays in Japan, there are some interesting holiday traditions in Japan for recognizing it.

    Learn more about Japanese Coming of Age Day and its significance to the Japanese people!

    2. What is Coming of Age Day in Japan?

    Young People Celebrating Coming of Age Day

    On Japanese Coming of Age Day (or Seijin no hi), Japan celebrates its youth who have turned 20 years old—the age which signifies official adulthood. And this is no minor celebration; it’s celebrated openly across the country, and is one of the most popular Japanese holidays.

    This day is marked by the Coming of Age Ceremony, during which town officials around Japan hold celebrations for these new adults to welcome them into adulthood.

    3. When is it?

    The Month of January

    Japanese Coming of Age Day takes place on the second Monday of January each year. For your convenience, here’s a quick list of the date of this holiday for the next ten years:

    • 2019: January 14
    • 2020: January 13
    • 2021: January 11
    • 2022: January 10
    • 2023: January 9
    • 2024: January 8
    • 2025: January 13
    • 2026: January 12
    • 2027: January 11
    • 2028: January 10

    4. How is it Celebrated?

    1- Coming of Age Ceremony

    On this day, the most important celebration is a Coming of Age Ceremony; one of these ceremonies takes place in various regions of Japan. All those who’ve turned 20 years old attend and are granted congratulations by town officials, as well as given a souvenir to remember the event by.

    These ceremonies also serve as an opportunity for the new Japanese adults to step up and show their maturity. It’s common for there to be a “representative” participant at these ceremonies, who gives a speech on behalf of each new Japanese adult. Oftentimes, these speeches contain promises of growing to become good and successful people, as well as hope for the future.

    Another special feature of the Coming of Age Ceremony is that participants from the previous year are also welcomed to attend. This not only allows the new adults to see their older friends and acquaintances; it also gives the older visitors the opportunity to cheer on their younger friends and reflect on their own Coming of Age Ceremony the year before.

    2- Dress

    It’s common for the young people to dress up in nice traditional clothing, particularly the young women who wear a 振袖 (ふりそで) or “furisode,” which is a special type of kimono. Men tend to opt for a suit and tie themselves, but on occasion will choose to wear a kimono with a 袴 (はか)
    or “hakama,” which are like loose-fitting trousers.

    3- Food and Fun

    After the ceremonies are over, some of the young people choose to spend time partying with their close friends and family. Oftentimes, they go out drinking and enjoy eating 赤飯 (せきはん),
    or “sekihan,” which is a popular dish with rice and red beans often associated with holidays and special events.

    Despite recent changes in the holiday (namely: lesser participation among youths and lowered age of maturity to 18 soon to take effect), it remains a significant day in the lives of many new adults and their families.

    5. Must-Know Vocab for Coming of Age Day

    Sekihan, A Popular Rice and Bean Dish

    Now that you’ve learned more about Japanese Coming of Age Day, let’s delve into some vocabulary you should know to celebrate this Japanese holiday to its fullest!

    • スーツ (スーツ)
      • English Translation: Suit
    • 袴 (はか)
      • English Translation: Hakama (loose-fitting trousers sometimes worn by young men on this day)
    • 成人の日 (せいじんのひ)
      • English Translation: Coming of Age Day
    • 振袖 (ふりそで)
      • English Translation: Furisode (a special kimono worn by females on this day)
    • 二十歳 (はたち)
      • English Translation: Twenty years old
    • お祝い (おいわい)
      • English Translation: Celebration
    • 成人式 (せいじんしき)
      • English Translation: Coming of age ceremony
    • 赤飯 (せきはん)
      • English Translation: Sekihan (a dish with rice and red beans)
    • 1月の第2月曜日 (いちがつの だいにげつようび)
      • English Translation: The second Monday of January
    • 新成人 (しんせいじん)
      • English Translation: New adult
    • 羽織 (はおり)
      • English Translation: Haori coat (a type of coat worn on top of a kosode)

    If you want to learn how to pronounce these words, be sure to check out our Japanese Coming of Age Day word list. Here, you can find audio pronunciations along with each word to help you better learn them.

    Conclusion

    Now you have a greater knowledge of Japanese Coming of Age Day, including the most important vocabulary for you to know.

    If you want to learn even more about Japanese culture, be sure to visit JapanesePod101.com! We have an array of helpful tools to help you learn Japanese efficiently and in an entertaining manner. These include vocabulary lists, blog posts on various Japanese topics, and our MyTeacher app which gives you access to one-on-one training as you learn Japanese.

    We hope you found this article helpful, and that you enjoy your Coming of Age Day celebration in Japan!

    Blood Type Personality in Japan: What It Says about You

    If you have ever visited Japan or stayed in Japan for quite some time, you have probably noticed that a lot of Japanese people ask “what is your blood type?”. This question is one of the most common questions that Japanese people ask. In Japan, it is perfectly fine to ask about a person’s blood type, especially if you want to get to know someone very well instantly, in particular, on a blind date. The reason is that Japanese people believe that each blood type has its own distinct personality and it is the quickest way to determine a person’s temperament and even compatibility with others. You may feel confused as to why people ask about blood types in Japan, but don’t worry. If you are asked this by a Japanese, that means that the person wants to get to know you better.

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    So who developed this concept? The blood type personality theory was developed by a Japanese person named Masahiko Nomi who graduated from the University of Tokyo. He began his first career as a journalist and his first book “Understanding Affinity by Blood Type” became a bestseller in the 1970s. The idea then spread outward and it is popular in some Asian countries, such as South Korea and Taiwan. You are probably wondering, ‘so what’s this all about?’, so let’s have a look at the description of each blood type to see if it matches with your personality. Then let’s look at the compatibility of blood types.

    Blood Type A

    1. Blood Type A

    According to the Japanese blood type personality chart, it is said that people with blood type A are known to be diplomatic and friendly, however due to their sensitive natures, they prefer staying alone to being in a group; therefore they may feel uncomfortable in crowded areas or parties. Also, they are fragile-hearted and easily get hurt, therefore it takes time for them to open up to people. Others may take this negatively and view them as snobs, since people with blood type A are good at hiding their feelings and do not express themselves a lot compared to other blood types such as blood type B or O. If you want to be friends with a person with Blood Type A, the best way is to be patient and get to know them slowly. Once you get to know them you will find that they are very friendly and down to earth! Also, they are punctual and always expect the best results in everything they do, therefore others seem them as perfectionists. When people describe blood type A, you will often hear:

    A型は、几帳面で細かいそうです。
    Aがたは、きちょうめんでこまかいそうです。
    A-gata wa, kichōmen de komakai sō desu.
    “People with type A blood are earnest and sensitive.”

    Blood Type A Personality in Japanese

    • 几帳面 (きちょうめん, kichōmen) = “methodical”
    • 慎重 (しんちょう, shinchō) = “cautious”
    • こだわりが強い (こだわりがつよい, kodawari ga tsuyoi) = “stubborn”
    • 細かい (こまかい, komakai) = “detailed”

    Blood Type Compatibility for A

    • The best blood type compatibility is O, followed by A.
    • The worst blood type compatibility is B.

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    Blood Type B

    2. Blood Type B

    According to the Japanese blood type personality chart, it is said that B types are the most outgoing compared to other blood types. Also they are independent and are passionate about the things that they are interested in. Type Bs always seek stimulation and they are not afraid of speaking their minds. Therefore, they can be seen as self-centered because they express their opinion, regardless of what the other person might feel.

    In Japan, men with blood type B have a negative reputation for being playboys and for not suitable for a stable relationship. But don’t worry, although blood type B has a negative reputation for being the blood type of playboys, there are many positive traits too. They are curious, honest and enjoy attention, therefore people with blood type B can make friends easily, like a social butterfly! When people describe blood type B, you will often hear:

    B型は、創造的で楽観的なようです。
    Bがたは、そうぞうてきでらっかんてきなようです。
    B-gata wa, sōzōteki de rakkanteki na yō desu.
    “People with blood type B are creative and optimistic.”

    Blood Type B Personality in Japanese

    • 創造的 (そうぞうてき, sōzōteki) “creative”
    • 楽観的 (らっかんてき, rakkanteki) “optimistic”
    • 利己的 (りこてき, rikoteki) “selfish”
    • 無責任 (むせきにん, musekinin) “irresponsible”

    Blood Type Compatibility for B

    • The best blood type compatibility is AB, followed by O.
    • The worst blood type compatibility is A.

    Blood Type O

    3. Blood Type O

    They are known to be energetic, practical and friendly. Also blood type O is labeled as a natural leader. They are experts at expressing their opinions in a constructive way, making sure that everyone listens to them, while still being friendly to everyone. They know how to control their emotions very well, giving others a great impression of being stable and under control. Research indicates that blood type O is the most prefered blood type by CEOs and coworkers because of the traits mentioned above. However, although they might have a reputation of being strong outside, they are very sensitive inside. People with blood type O have some difficulties expressing their feelings due to a fear of rejection and also they tend to burn themselves out trying to get things done perfectly. The best way to describe type Os in Japanese is:

    O型の人は情熱的だと言われています。
    Oがたのひとはじょうねつてきだといわれています。
    Ō-gata no hito wa jōnetsuteki da to iwarete imasu.
    “It’s said that people with type O blood are passionate.”

    Blood Type O Personality in Japanese

    • おおらか(おおらか, ōraka) = “easygoing”
    • 社交的 (しゃこうてき, shakōteki) = “outgoing”
    • 高慢 (こうまん, kōman) = “arrogant”
    • 嫉妬深い (しっとぶかい, shittobukai) = “jealous”

    Blood Type Compatibility for O

    • The best blood type compatibility is A, followed by B.
    • The worst blood type compatibility is AB.

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    Blood Type AB

    4. Blood Type AB

    They are the most interesting type compared to the others because this blood type is labeled as either genius or psycho. They are unpredictable because they often jump around from one activity to the next and their temperament is mixture of blood type A and B, therefore their personalities change quickly depending on their mood and the situation, and sometimes they don’t have control over it. Also type ABs are rational thinkers, therefore they cannot stand it when they find some situations to be irrational. As a result, they may have some difficulties interacting with people, giving others the wrong impression of being moody or two-faced. One of the ways to describe blood type ABs is:

    日本でAB型の人は少ないです。
    にほんでABがたのひとはすくないです。
    Nihon de ĒBī-gata no hito wa sukunai desu.
    “We don’t have many people with the AB blood type in Japan.”

    Blood Type AB Personality in Japanese

    • 合理的 (ごうりてき, gōriteki) = “rational”
    • 才能がある (さいのうがある, sainō ga aru) = “to be talented”
    • 批判的 (ひはんてき, hihanteki) = “critical”
    • 風変わり (ふうがわり, fūgawari) = “eccentric”

    Blood Type Compatibility for AB

    • The best blood type compatibility is AB, followed by B.
    • The worst blood type compatibility is O.

    Now, let’s have a look at few useful Japanese sentences which you can use right away.

    Talking about Blood Type

    5. Talking about Your Blood Type in Japanese

    “What’s your blood type?”

    • Informal: (あなたの)血液型は何型? ((あなたの)けつえきがたはなにがた? Anata no ketsueki-gata wa nani-gata?)
    • Formal: (あなたの)血液型は何型ですか。 ((あなたの)けつえきがたはなにがたですか。 Anata no ketsueki-gata wa nani-gata desu ka.)

    “My blood type is…”:

    • Informal: 私の血液型は、…。 (わたしのけつえきがたは、…。 Watashi no ketsueki-gata wa, … )
    • Formal: 私の血液型は、…です。 (わたしのけつえきがたは、…です。 Watashi no ketsueki-gata wa, … desu.)

    Example:

    A: なおこの血液型は何型?
    A: (なおこのけつえきがたはなにがた? Naoko no ketsueki-gata wa nani-gata?)
    A: “What’s Naoko’s blood type?”

    B: なおこの血液型は、O型。
    B: (なおこのけつえきがたは、Oがた。, Naoko no ketsueki-gata wa, O-gata.)
    B: “Naoko’s blood type is O.”

    Tokyo

    6. How JapanesePod101 Can Help You Learn more Japanese

    You’ve learned some secret Japanese blood type personalities with useful Japanese phrases to describe your blood type personality.

    To sum up, we had a look at each blood type and its personality and temperament, and blood type compatibility for each type. Do you think that they are true? Also, do you know how to describe your personality in Japanese? JapanesePod101 has prepared a list of useful Japanese adjectives to describe your personality for you to study. It is available online, so feel free to download it for free.

    Log in to Download Your Free Cheat Sheet - How to Master A Language!

    So next time you run into a Japanese person and want to understand their personality quickly, why not ask a simple question, like:

    血液型は何型ですか。
    ketsueki-gata wa nani-gata desu ka.
    “What is your blood type?”

    JapanesePod101 has many vocabulary lists available on our website for you to download for free. Why don’t you prepare a self-introduction, including your blood type and your personality in Japanese? Click “10 Lines You Need for Introducing Yourself” to learn practical phrases in Japanese.

    Thank you and we hope that you enjoy learning Japanese!

    Fall In Love With Learning

    enjoy learning the language you wantLet’s face it. Learning Japanese seems like a daunting task. You’ve got your hands full with new alphabet systems, grammar structures, formality levels and expressions…not knowing where to start, tackling this language and its nuances may be overwhelming. Luckily, the team at JapanesePod101 is dedicated to ensuring your linguistic success.

    As a foreign language enthusiast, I’ve flirted with a fair share of online learning sites (especially for Japanese), but none of them were ever the one my heart was looking for. I had almost completely given up my pursuit of Japanese, until JapanesePod101 made me fall in love with learning.

    Why JapanesePod101 Works:

    • Fun AND Free! How often do you see this combo?! Really though, JapanesePod101 takes away the stress and monotony that most online language sites induce. No more clicking through boring flashcards! Instead, indulge your senses in an audio-visual treat with native speaking hosts, to learn everything from famous Japanese quotes, to essential vocab for Star Wars Day.
    • Where to Start:From Absolute Beginner to Advanced fluency flexer, JapanesePod101 has got you covered. As soon as you log in, your dashboard guides you on a learning path to help you master Japan and its language. You can choose to start from the beginning or jump to a learning path that suits you best.
    • Customize to Optimize: JapanesePod101 grants you creative liberty to tailor-make your own lessons. They’ll help you navigate your way through hiragana, katakana, kanji, and even the streets of Tokyo if you so choose. You learn what you want, when you want.
    • Convenience at the Core: With an accompanying mobile application, you can master Japanese while riding the subway to work, waiting in line for lunch, or sitting on the couch when your computer is just out of arm’s reach. You can view and finish lessons as slow or fast as you want, working best for your schedule.
    • Retain and Remember: After finishing a lesson, there are accompanying assessments to help ensure that you’ve actually learned what you intended to. You can take the assessments as many times as you want, so if you’re ever feeling rusty, these mini-tests are a great refresher.
    • bonus points if you can read any of these lanterns
      A JapanesePod101 account is a Free Lifetime Account, which means exactly as it sounds. You can use JapanesePod101’s resources forever, and for free. So what are you waiting for? That kanji isn’t going to memorize itself!

      p

    How to Start Thinking in Japanese

    Learn 4 tools and techniques to stop translating in your head and start thinking in Japanese

    Going through Japanese lessons is enough to get by and learn the basics of Japanese, but to truly become fluent you need to be able to think in Japanese. This will allow you to have conversations with ease, read smoothly, and comprehensively understand natives. To do this, you need to go beyond just completing daily or weekly lessons.

    We naturally translate in our heads because it’s viewed as the easiest way to learn the definitions needed when learning a language. This way of learning can actually hinder your skills and fluency later on. If your brain has to make neural connections between the word you’re learning, what it means in your native tongue, and the physical object the connection will not be nearly as strong. When you bypass the original translation between Japanese and your native language then there is a more basic and strong connection between just the Japanese vocabulary word and the tangible object.

    In this blog post, you will learn the 4 important techniques to easily and naturally begin to speculate about the daily occurrences in your life. The best part is all of these techniques are supported and can be achieved through JapanesePod101.com.

    Create Your Free Lifetime Account and Start Learning the whole Japanese Language from the Beginning!

    Chatting

    1. Surround yourself with Japanese

    By surrounding yourself with Japanese constantly you will completely immerse yourself in the language. Without realizing it you’ll be learning pronunciation, sentence structures, grammar, and new vocabulary. You can play music in the background while you’re cooking or have a Japanese radio station on while you study. Immersion is a key factor with this learning process because it is one of the easiest things to do, but very effective. Even if you are not giving the program your full attention you will be learning.

    One great feature of JapanesePod101.com is the endless podcasts that are available to you. You can even download and listen to them on the go. These podcasts are interesting and are perfect for the intention of immersion, they are easy to listen to as background noise and are interesting enough to give your full attention. Many of them contain stories that you follow as you go through the lessons which push you to keep going.

    Learn Through Observation

    2. Learn through observation

    Learning through observation is the most natural way to learn. Observation is how we all learned our native languages as infants and it’s a wonder why we stop learning this way. If you have patience and learn through observation then Japanese words will have their own meanings rather than meanings in reference to your native language. Ideally you should skip the bilingual dictionary and just buy a dictionary in Japanese.

    JapanesePod101.com also offers the materials to learn this way. We have numerous video lessons which present situational usage of each word or phrase instead of just a direct translation. For example, in on JapanesePod101.com we have a video about how to ride the bus we tell you to say “Dozo” when offering your seat instead of just saying that it means go ahead. This holds true for many of our videos and how our videos and how we teach Japanese.

    Speak Out Loud

    3. Speak out loud to yourself

    Speaking to yourself in Japanese not only gets you in the mindset of Japanese, but also makes you listen to how you speak. It forces you to correct any errors with pronunciation and makes it easy to spot grammar mistakes. When you speak out loud talk about what you did that day and what you plan to do the next day. Your goal is to be the most comfortable speaking out loud and to easily create sentences. Once you feel comfortable talking to yourself start consciously thinking in your head about your daily activities and what is going on around you throughout the day.

    With JapanesePod101.com you start speaking right away, not only this, but they have you repeat words and conversations after a native Japanese speaker. This makes your pronunciation very accurate! With this help you are on the fast path to making clear and complex sentences and then actively thinking about your day.

    Practice

    4. Practice daily

    If you don’t practice daily then your progress will be greatly slowed. Many people are tempted to take the 20-30 minutes they should be practicing a day and practice 120 in one day and skip the other days. This isn’t nearly as effective because everyday you practice you are reinforcing the skills and knowledge you have learned. If you practice all in one day you don’t retain the information because the brain can realistically only focus for 30 minutes at most. If you’re studying for 120 minutes on the same subject little of the information will be absorbed. Studying everyday allows you to review material that you went over previous days and absorb a small amount of information at a time.

    It’s tough to find motivation to study everyday, but JapanesePod101.com can help. It’s easy to stay motivated with JapanesePod101.com because we give you a set learning path, with this path we show how much progress you’ve made. This makes you to stick to your goals and keep going!

    Conclusion

    Following the steps and having patience is the hardest part to achieving your goals, it’s not easy learning a new language. You are essentially teaching your brain to categorize the world in a completely new way. Stick with it and you can do it just remember the 4 tools I taught you today! With them conversations, reading, and understanding will become much easier. The most important thing to remember is to use the tools that JapanesePod101.com provides and you will be on your way to being fluent!

    Learn Japanese With JapanesePod101 Today!