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Archive for the 'Japanese Food' Category

50+ Restaurants Phrases for Eating Out in Japan

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Sushi, Ramen, Okonomiyaki… Japanese food is gaining fame around the world nowadays, and Japanese food lovers are increasing every year. Japan is known for delicious food, and everyone would be surprised by its variety of restaurants in every aspect when they come to Japan for the first time.

Whether you are a tourist or not, knowing the basic Japanese restaurant phrases is not only useful for smooth ordering but also for enjoying your dining time better. 

This article introduces the most useful Japanese restaurant phrases as well as tips and handy information about restaurants in Japan that would definitely help you make the most of your dining experience in Japan. Let’s start brushing up on your useful basic phrases in Japanese now!

Tables and Chairs Inside a Restaurant

Log in to Download Your Free Cheat Sheet - Beginner Vocabulary in Japanese Table of Contents
  1. How to Look for Good Restaurants in Japan
  2. Booking a Restaurant
  3. At a Restaurant
  4. After Dining
  5. Conclusion

1. How to Look for Good Restaurants in Japan

First of all, Japanese people are avid foodies and they are quite demanding and particular about food. Not only the fact that Tokyo is the world’s most Michelin-starred city, more than Paris and New York City, but also there are a wide variety of food genres and levels of restaurants in Japan. Before learning Japanese dining phrases, let’s take a look at facts about Japanese restaurants!

1. Restaurant Variations in Japan

Before learning Japanese restaurant phrases, let’s take a look at an overview of restaurants in Japan.

Ranging from various world cuisines to Japanese food, from one-coin 牛丼 gyūdon (beef bowl) restaurants to high-class Japanese traditional restaurants such as 高級料亭 kōkyū ryōtei and 懐石料理 Kaiseki ryōri , you never run out of choices of restaurants, and you will always find any restaurants you prefer according to your budget, mood, and preferences.

Some of the most popular world cuisines in Japan and their Japanese words are listed below. 

EnglishKanjiHiraganaReading
Chinese (cuisines)中国 / 中華 料理ちゅうごく/ちゅうか りょうりChūgoku / Chūka ryōri 
Korean  (cuisines)韓国料理かんこく りょうりKankoku ryōri 
Vietnamese (cuisines)ベトナム料理べとなむ りょうりBetonamu ryōri 
Thai (cuisines)タイ料理たい りょうりTai ryōri 
Indian (cuisines)インド料理いんど りょうりIndo ryōri 
Mexican (cuisines)メキシコ料理めきしこ りょうりMekishiko ryōri 
French (cuisines)フランス料理ふらんす りょうりFuransu ryōri 
Italian (cuisines)イタリア料理いたりあ りょうりItaria  ryōri 

Foreign Customers Are Eating at Sushi Restaurant

When you sit at the counter at a sushi restaurant, you can directly order your menu from the chef.

Even if you say “Japanese food” as a general category, you will not find a single restaurant in Japan that provides all kinds of Japanese food. The reason why is that Japanese restaurants in Japan are mostly specialized according to  the kinds of Japanese food they serve, such as ラーメン Ramen, うどん Udon, そば Soba, お好み焼き Okonomiyaki, 焼肉 Yakiniku, 寿司 Sushi, etc. 

When you look at the chart below, you will see that “Japanese food” has a wide range of characteristics such as food genre and rank.

Chart Describing Restaurant Service

Even for “Sushi” restaurants, there are casual “立ち食い tachigui (“standing at a counter to eat”) and “回転寿司 kaitenzushi (“Sushi go-around”)” style restaurants which are usually more reasonable, and also high class and expensive “real” Sushi restaurants prepared by trained Sushi chefs with fresh and high-quality ingredients.

Some casual restaurants, such as 牛丼 Gyūdon and ラーメン Ramen, have the 食券 shokken (“meal ticket”) system where customers have to buy a meal ticket from a ticket machine usually set in the entrance for ordering food. Although their staff services are minimal, it’s very quick and reasonable.

Please check out A Guide to the Best Traditional Japanese Foods to learn more about Japanese food!

Japanese Ticket Machine for Ordering Meal

食券 shokken (“meal ticket”)
Some Japanese casual restaurants have ticket machines for ordering meals.

2. Search on the Internet / Apps

So, now you understand there is a wide range of restaurants to choose from in Japan. Then, how can you find a good restaurant that you prefer? Well, the easiest answer is the modern necessity, the Internet!

Due to such huge lists of restaurants with various characteristics in Japan, there are a lot of websites and apps that provide useful information about restaurants, and you can search by genre of food, budget, area, and keywords such as “for anniversary,” “children welcome,” “night view,” etc. 

Here are some examples:

  • ホットペッパーグルメ Hot Pepper Gourmet

    Hot Pepper Gourmet is positioned as one of the major restaurant search websites/apps in Japan, along with Gurunavi and Taberogu. Not only can users check information about restaurants, reviews, and menus, but also search for restaurants matched with their current position and make a reservation online. Users also benefit from coupons.

  • 食べログ Taberogu

    Taberogu is initially a restaurant review website as its name indicates: 食べ(る) tabe(ru) “eat” + ログ rogu “log.”  They have more than 130,000 subscribers and 2 billion page views a month. Taberogu is generally highly recognized as a review 口コミ kuchikomi (“word of mouth”) website for restaurants, and they evaluate restaurants based on the reviews from those who actually visited restaurants. Evaluation is updated twice a month, and a lot of people use the website as a reference for choosing a restaurant. On the website, users can make reservations and benefit from coupons.

  • ぐるなび Gurunavi

    Gurunavi, named after a short version of “gourmet navigation,” started as a restaurant booking website, and now the website has grown to have 56 million page views a month. They have information about over 60,000 restaurants and also provide pages for special features on seasonal or themed events. A variety of coupons are available, and not only can you reserve a table at restaurants, but you can also order delivery and takeaway.

  • レッティ Retty

    Retty started as a social networking service for foodies. Users can post reviews of restaurants they visited on their pages and share them with other users. Users can follow other users so that they will always have real and up-to-date reviews and information about new restaurants when following “gourmet nerds” or “super foodies.” Like other websites/apps, you can make an online restaurant reservation with Retty.

  • 一休.comレストラン  Ikkyu .com

    Ikkyu Restaurant focuses on restaurants, but Ikkyu.com is a booking website that also provides services for booking hotels and spas. Providing high-quality services through making a reservation at selected restaurants is their main objective. They are proud that all the restaurants, hotels, and spas listed on Ikkyu.com are selected ones that passed the distinctive standard of selection. If you are looking for something nice for special occasions or high-class luxury, Ikkyu Restaurant helps you perfectly. Subscribers will benefit from exclusive plans and offers.

Even if you don’t actually make a booking with these websites/apps, just looking at them can be an interesting way for Japanese language learning with a lot of pictures!

Useful Vocabs for Searching

Here is the list of useful and essential Japanese restaurant vocabulary and keywords that you can use for your search for restaurants. 

EnglishKanjiHiraganaReading
No smoking table禁煙席 きんえんせきkin’enseki
Smoking table喫煙席 きつえんせきkitsuenseki
Private room個室 こしつkoshitsu
OK to bring children子連れOKこづれOKkozure ōkē
Night view夜景 やけいyakei
Girls’ party/gathering女子会 じょしかいjoshikai
For dateデートでーとdēto
Fashionable/ stylishお洒落おしゃれoshare
For anniversary/special day記念日きねんびkinenbi
All you can eat食べ放題たべほうだいtabehōdai
All you can drink飲み放題のみほうだいnomihōdai

A Person Is Touching a Smartphone with an Index Finger

It’s easy to search nice restaurants on Apps and websites nowadays.

3. Asking For Recommendations

Gathering information online is very easy and quick. However, it’s always good to listen to real, local opinions! Following are some Japanese restaurant phrases that you can use when asking someone for recommendations.

[Japanese]    この辺りでおすすめの [ イタリアン / 寿司屋 ] はどこですか。          
                     Kono atari de osusume no [ Itarian / sushiya ] wa doko desu ka.

[English]        “Which [Italian / Sushi restaurant ] is recommended around here?”

[Japanese]    [Area] で一番美味しいラーメン屋はどこですか。          
                      [ Area ] de ichi-ban oishii rāmen’ya wa doko desu ka.

[English]        “Where is the most delicious Ramen restaurant in [Area]?”

[Japanese]    [Area]で英語のメニューがあるカジュアルなレストランを知っていますか。          
                      [ Area ] de Eigo no menyū ga aru kajuaru na resutoran o shitte imasu ka.

[English]        “Do you know any casual restaurant with an English menu in [Area]?”

[Japanese]    デートに使えるおしゃれなレストランを知っていますか。         
                      Dēto ni tsukaeru oshare na resutoran o shitte imasu ka.

[English]        “Do you know any fashionable restaurant that you can use for a date?”

[Japanese]    [ name ] へ行ったことがありますか。美味しかったですか。          
                      [ name ] e itta koto ga arimasu ka. Oishikatta desu ka.

[English]        “Have you been to [name]? Was it good?”

[Japanese]    ベジタリアンの友達を連れて行くのに良いレストランはどこですか。          
                      Bejitarian no tomodachi o tsurete iku noni ii resutoran wa doko desu ka.

[English]        “Where is a nice restaurant to bring my vegetarian friend?”

In order to maximize your travel experience in Japan other than restaurants, please also check Tokyo Travel Guide: See Japan’s Incredible Capital City!

A Variety of Vegetables

ベジタリアンレストランを知っていますかBejitarian resutoran o shitte imasu ka.
(“Do you know any vegetarian restaurants?”)

2. Booking a Restaurant


1. Tips for Booking

The necessity of booking depends on what type of restaurant you would like to go to. You never need a reservation at most casual restaurants in Japan. However, a reservation is recommended for an 居酒屋 Izakaya, a Japanese kind of casual dining bar, if you plan to go on Friday night so you can secure a table. (Even if you don’t have a booking and are told it’s full, there are plenty of other dining bars and restaurants in lively areas in a big city, though!) 

Reservations are also recommended for popular restaurants, especially on weekends, and are probably considered reasonable etiquette for high-class restaurants.

Reserved Card on a Restaurant Table

予約席 yoyakuseki (“reserved seat”)

2. Booking Phrases

The following are useful Japanese restaurant phrases when you book a table at a restaurant. Some are very basic phrases in Japanese, and you can also use them on other booking occasions such as booking train tickets, etc.

Essential vocabularies:

  • 予約    よやく              yoyaku              (“reservation / booking”)
  • 予約する  よやくする         yoyaku suru      (“ to reserve / to make a reservation”)

[Japanese]    4月10日の夜8時に4人で予約できますか。           
                      Shi-gatsu tōka no yoru hachi-ji ni yo-nin de yoyaku dekimasu ka.

[English]        “Can I make a reservation for 4 people on the 10th of April?”

*To learn more about Japanese numbers and Japanese dates, see Japanese Numbers: Let’s Master the Basic Japanese Numbers and Japanese Calendar Dates: Reading Dates in Japanese & More.

[Japanese]    今日の夜7時頃に行きたいのですが、空いていますか。
                      Kyō no yoru shichi-ji goro ni ikitai no desu ga, aite imasu ka.

[English]        “We’d like to come around 7pm, do you have a seat?”

*Please visit the How to Tell Time in Japanese article on JapanesePod101 to learn how to tell the time in Japanese.

[Japanese]    大人2人と子供1人です。          
                      Otona futari to kodomo hitori desu.

[English]        “We are two adults and one child.”

[Japanese]    禁煙席で窓際希望です。          

                      Kin’enseki de madogiwa kibō desu.

[English]        “We would like a non-smoking seat and by the window.”

[Japanese]    名前はOOOで、電話番号はXXXです。          
                      Namae wa OOO de, denwa bangō wa XXX desu.

[English]        “My name is OOO, and the phone number is XXX.”

[Japanese]    5月の週末で予約可能な日はいつですか。        
                      Go-gatsu no shūmatsu de yoyaku kanō na hi wa itsu desu ka.

[English]        “When are available dates for booking on weekends in May?”

[Japanese]    記念日のディナーをしたいのですが、夜景の見える席を予約できますか。          
                      Kinenbi no dinā o shitai no desu ga, yakei no mieru seki o yoyaku dekimasu ka.

[English]        “I’d like to have dinner for the anniversary, can I reserve a table with a nice night view?”

[Japanese]    6人で利用できる個室を予約できますか。          
                      Roku-nin de riyō dekiru koshitsu o yoyaku dekimasu ka.

[English]        “Can I reserve a private room that can accommodate 6 people?”

[Japanese]    予約したいのですが、子連れでも大丈夫ですか。         
                      oyaku shitai no desu ga, kozure demo daijōbu desu ka.

[English]        “I’d like to make a reservation, but are children welcome?”

[Japanese]    30人位で誕生日パーティーを行いたいのですが、貸切にできますか。         
                      San-jū-nin kurai de tanjōbi pātī o okonaitai no desu ga, kashikiri ni dekimasu ka.

[English]        “I’d like to have a birthday party with about 30 people. Can I book the whole restaurant?”

A Japanese Woman Is Calling with a Mobile Phone

予約できますか。Yoyaku dekimasu ka. ( “Can I make a reservation?”)

3. At a Restaurant


1. Entering a Restaurant

Below is a list of Japanese restaurant phrases that will help you enter a restaurant smoothly. Some phrases are often asked by restaurant staff.

[Japanese]    予約はされていますか。            
                      Yoyaku wa sarete imasu ka.

[English]        “[staff] Do you have a reservation?”

[Japanese]    7時に3人で予約したOOOです。          
                      Shichi-ji ni san-nin de yoyaku shita OOO desu.

[English]        “I am OOO, I booked at 7 O’clock for 3.”

[Japanese]    OOOの名前で予約しています。          
                      OOO no namae de yoyaku shite imasu.

[English]        “I have a reservation under the name of OOO.”

[Japanese]    何名様ですか。          
                      Nan-mei-sama desu ka.

[English]        “[staff] How many people?”

[Japanese]    4人です。          
                      Yo-nin desu.

[English]        “We are four.”

[Japanese]    8人の席を作ってもらえますか。          
                      Hachi-nin no seki o tsukutte moraemasu ka.

[English]        “Can you arrange a table for 8 people?”

[Japanese]    窓際の席は空いてますか。         
                      Madogiwa no seki wa aite masu ka.

[English]        “Is a table by the window available?”

[Japanese]    子供用の椅子を一つ用意してもらえますか。        
                      Kodomoyō no isu o hitotsu yōi shite moraemasu ka.

[English]        “Could you please prepare one child’s chair?”

[Japanese]    ご案内するまで少々お待ちください。         
                      Go-annai suru made shōshō o-machi kudasai.

[English]        “[staff] Please wait for a moment, I will show you to your table shortly.”

[Japanese]    こちらへどうぞ。         
                      Kochira e dōzo.

[English]        “[staff] This way, please.”

A Waiter Is Guiding a Couple to the Table at a Restaurant

こちらへどうぞ。 Kochira e dōzo.  ( “This way, please.”)

2. Ordering

Most restaurants in Japan have menus with abundant pictures next to the names of dishes, therefore, you don’t have to worry too much about whether you would ever understand what’s written on a menu. However, it’s good to communicate with a restaurant staff to tell what you want and what you don’t want, as well as get information that is not written on a menu. 

These Japanese restaurant phrases below will help you order your meal smoother. Rather than just pointing at the menu and saying, “これにします I will have this,” let’s use the following Japanese dining phrases!

[Japanese]    今日のおすすめは何ですか。          
                      Kyō no osusume wa nan desu ka.

[English]        “What is today’s special?”

[Japanese]    一番人気の料理はどれですか。          
                      Ichi-ban ninki no ryōri wa dore desu ka.

[English]        “Which is the most popular dish?”

[Japanese]      英語のメニューはありますか。     
                      Eigo no menyū wa arimasu ka.

[English]        “Do you have a menu in English?”

[Japanese]    ベジタリアン用の料理はありますか。          
                      Bejitarian’yō no menyū wa arimasu ka.

[English]        “Do you have dishes for vegetarians?”

[Japanese]    ご注文はお決まりですか。       
                      Go-chūmon wa o-kimari desu ka.

[English]        “[staff] Have you decided what you want to order?”

[Japanese]    もう少し時間をください。          
                      Mō sukoshi jikan o kudasai.

[English]        “Can I have a little more time?”

[Japanese]    これに牛乳と卵は入っていますか。アレルギーがあります。      
                      Kore ni gyūnyū to tamago wa haitte imasu ka. Arerugī ga arimasu.

[English]        “Does this contain milk and egg? I have allergies.”

[Japanese]    これにお肉は入っていますか。お肉は食べられません。     
                      Kore ni o-niku wa haitte imasu ka. O-niku wa taberaremasen.

[English]        “Does this contain meat? I cannot eat meat.”

[Japanese]    これはどんな味ですか。        
                      Kore wa donna aji desu ka.

[English]        “What does this taste like?”

[Japanese]    これは辛いですか。   
                      Kore wa karai desu ka.

[English]        “Is this spicy?”

[Japanese]    辛いのは苦手です。唐辛子が入っていない料理はありますか。          
                      Karai no wa nigate desu. Tōgarashi ga haitte inai ryōri wa arimasu ka.

[English]        “I’m not good at spicy food. Are there dishes that do not contain chili peppers?”

[Japanese]    これとこれにします。          
                      Kore to kore ni shimasu.

[English]        “I will have this and this (by pointing on a menu).”

[Japanese]    Bランチセットをお願いします。          
                      B ranchi setto o onegai shimasu.

[English]        “I would like a B Lunch Set.”

[Japanese]    とんかつ定食と温かいお茶をください。        
                      Tonkatsu teishoku to atatakai o-cha o kudasai.

[English]        “I would like a Tonkatsu teishoku set and hot tea, please.”

[Japanese]    本日のスープとフィレステーキのミディアムレアをお願いします。        
                      Honjitsu no sūpu to fire sutēki no midiamu rea o onegai shimasu.

[English]        “I would like today’s soup and a medium-rare filet steak, please.”

[Japanese]    セットのドリンクはアイスティーをお願いします。          
                      Setto no dorinku wa aisu tī o onegai shimasu.

[English]        “I would like iced tea for the drink in the set.”

*You can choose either hot or cold (iced) coffee and tea at most restaurants in Japan. 

[Japanese]    ワイン/ 飲み物 のメニューはありますか。          
                      Wain / nomimono no menyū wa arimasu ka.

[English]        “Do you have a wine list / drink menu?”

[Japanese]    生ビールをください。         
                      Namabīru o kudasai.

[English]        “I’d like draft beer, please.”

[Japanese]    食後にホットコーヒーをお願いします。          
                      Shokugo ni hotto kōhī o onegai shimasu.

[English]        “I would like hot coffee after a meal.”

[Japanese]    いただきます
                      Itadakimasu.

[English]        “(Japanese greeting phrase before eating) Thankfully I have a meal.”

* In order to learn more about Japanese untranslatable phrases and words, please check Japanese Untranslatable Words: Let’s Talk like a Native!

[Japanese]    デザートのご注文はございますか。          
                      Dezāto no go-chūmon wa gozaimasu ka.

[English]        “[staff] Would you like to order desserts?”

For more about Japanese words for English speakers and Japanese nouns related to food and restaurants, see our Food – Utensils & Tableware and Restaurant vocabulary lists.

A Couple Is Ordering Dishes at a Restaurant

ご注文はお決まりですか Go-chūmon wa o-kimari desu ka.
(“Have you decided what you want to order?”)

3. Requesting

[Japanese]    すみません、お水 / ナプキンをもらえますか。           
                      Sumimasen, o-mizu / napukin o moraemasu ka.

[English]        “ Excuse me, can I have water / napkins?”

[Japanese]    小さい取り皿とスプーンをお願いします。          
                      Chiisai torizara to supūn o onegai shimasu.

[English]        “Can you bring me a small plate and a spoon, please?”

[Japanese]    お箸をもう一膳もらえますか。         
                      O-hashi o mō ichi-zen morae masu ka.

[English]        “Can I have one more set of chopsticks?”

[Japanese]    同じグラスワインをもう一杯ください。         
                      Onaji gurasu wain o mō ippai kudasai.

[English]        “I would like another glass of the same wine.”

[Japanese]    デザートのメニューをもらえますか。          
                      Dezāto no menyū o morae masu ka.

[English]        “Can I have a dessert menu, please?”

[Japanese]    ティラミスとカフェラテホットをお願いします。       
                      Tiramisu to kaferate hotto o onegai shimasu.

[English]        “I would like Tiramisu and a hot caffe latte.”

[Japanese]    お手洗い/化粧室はどこですか。       
                      O-tearai / keshōshitsu wa doko desu ka.

[English]        “Where is a wash / powder room? ”

* The word “化粧室 keshōshitsu (“powder room”)” is the more polite expression to use but it’s usually used by women.

A Man Is Calling a Waiter from a Table at a Restaurant

すみません、お水をもらえますか
                      Sumimasen, o-mizu o moraemasu ka. (“ Excuse me, can I have water?”)

4. After Dining

Apart from learning essential Japanese phrases for restaurants, here is information you need to know for after dining!

1. Etiquettes and Tips

  • After eating everything, you can ask for hot (green) tea FOR FREE at Japanese restaurants, especially at Sushi and Teishoku restaurants, etc. 
  • No Tip Needed: You never need to leave a tip in restaurants in Japan! If you leave money on your table, staff would run after you to tell you “you forgot your money”. 
  • Pay at a Cashier (not at the table): Unlike most restaurants in western culture, customers usually pay at a cashier at the entrance of a restaurant in Japan. After telling a waiter “Check, please”, he/she brings your bill to your table, but you need to take it to a cashier to pay. 
  • Though most casual restaurants allow customers to take leftovers home by offering a container, some restaurants refuse to do so due to hygiene and safety reasons. 

If you want to learn more about Japanese etiquette, please visit Japanese Etiquette and Manners!

Maki Sushi and Oriental Tea

温かいお茶をもらえますか Atatakai o-cha o moraemasu ka. (”Can I have hot tea?”)

2. Useful Phrases after Eating

Here are some useful Japanese restaurant phrases after finishing your meal.

[Japanese]    ごちそうさまでした。           
                      Gochisō-sama deshita.

[English]        “ (Japanese greeting phrase after eating) Thank you for good food.”

[Japanese]    とても美味しかったです。          
                      Totemo oishikatta desu.

[English]        “It was very delicious.”

[Japanese]    持ち帰りにできますか。         
                      Mochikaeri ni dekimasu ka.

[English]        “Can I take this home?”

[Japanese]    残った料理用に持ち帰り容器をもらえますか。        
                      Nokotta ryōriyō ni mochikaeri yōki o moraemasu ka.

[English]        “Can I have a container for leftovers?”

[Japanese]    お会計お願いします。          
                      O-kaikei onegai shimasu.

[English]        “Check, please.”

[Japanese]    現金/カードで払います。       
                      Genkin / kādo de haraimasu.

[English]        “I will pay by cash /card.”

[Japanese]    VISAカードは使えますか。 
                      Biza kādo wa tsukaemasu ka.

[English]        “Can I use a VISA card? ”

[Japanese]    決済アプリは使えますか。
                      Kessai apuri wa tsukaemasu ka.

[English]        “Can I use a payment application?”

*In Japan, payment applications such as  LINE Pay, PayPay, Rakuten Pay, Amazon Pay, Apple Pay etc. are popular alternatives to cash or credit.

[Japanese]    別々に払えますか。
                      Betsu-betsu ni harae masu ka.

[English]        “Can we pay separately? ”

[Japanese]    私が全部払います。
                      Watashi ga zenbu haraimasu.

[English]        “I will pay for everything.”

[Japanese]    美味しかったです。また来ます。 
                      Oishikatta desu. Mata kimasu.

[English]        “It was good, I (we) will come back again. ”

Front and Back of a Black Credit Card

カードで払います。Kādo de haraimasu.  (“I will pay by card.”)

5. Conclusion

In this article, we introduced the most useful Japanese Restaurant Phrases by situation as well as restaurant tips and information, including:

  • Restaurant Variations in Japan 
  • Useful Restaurant Search Websites/Apps
  • Phrase for Asking for Recommendations
  • Tips for Booking
  • Booking Phrases
  • Phrases for Entering a Restaurant
  • Phrases for Ordering 
  • Phrases for Requesting
  • Etiquette and Tips after Dining
  • Phrases after Dining

With these Japanese restaurant phrases and information, you’ll be able to maximize your dining experience in Japan along with delicious food!

If you would like to learn more about Japanese words for English speakers, you’ll find a lot more helpful content on JapanesePod101.com. This is the best place to learn Japanese online, providing a variety of free lessons designed to help you improve your Japanese-language skills. 

If you are interested in more Japanese phrases by situations, the following articles are just right for you: 

And there’s so much more! Be a faster learner and enjoy studying Japanese at JapanesePod101.com!

Before you go, let us know in the comments if there are any specific topics or situations you’d like to learn Japanese phrases for. We’d be glad to help, and we look forward to hearing from you! 

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How to Cook Delicious Chicken Teriyaki While Learning Japanese

Do you like chicken teriyaki? If so, this blog post is perfect for you. In this lesson, you’re going to learn an easy way to cook delicious chicken teriyaki while learning Japanese. Check out 鶏のテリヤキのレシピ (Tori no teriyaki no reshipi; chicken teriyaki recipe) below! Make sure to listen to the audio lesson and review the words and phrases too!

Cook Chicken Teryaki While Learning Japanese

Listen to our Japanese audio lesson – How to Make Japanese Teriyaki Chicken!


1. What’s teriyaki?

Teriyaki (テリヤキ) is one of the most well-known and popular cooking methods in Japanese cuisine. Fish or meat (or other types of ingredients) are marinated in sweet soy sauce and then grilled or broiled. We can write teriyaki in kanji (照り焼き), hiragana, or katakana.


2. Ingredients (材料; Zairyō)

  • One piece of chicken (鶏肉1枚; Toriniku ichi-mai)
  • Fifty milliliters of soy saucee (しょうゆ50cc; Shōyu gojū-cc)
  • Fifty millliters of vinegar (酢50cc; Su gojū-cc)
  • Thirty grams of sugar (砂糖30グラム; Satō sanjū-guramu)

Teriyaki Rice

Learn more Japanese vocabulary about cooking!

Let’s make Japanese chicken teriyaki! Do you have your ingredients? So let’s begin making it.
鶏のテリヤキを作りましょう!材料はありますか。では、作り始めましょう。
(Tori no teriyaki o tsukurimashō! Aairyō wa arimasu ka. Dewa, tsukuri hajimemashō.)


3. How to Make Simple Teriyaki Sauce & Chicken Teriyaki

Learn more Japanese vocabulary about kitchen items!

1) Mix together the soy sauce, the vinegar, and the sugar.

  • しょうゆと、酢と、砂糖を混ぜてください。
  • Shōyu to, su to, satō o mazete kudasai.

2) Keep mixing until the sugar dissolves.

  • 砂糖が溶けるまで、混ぜ続けてくださいね。
  • Satō ga tokeru made, mazetsudukete kudasai ne.

3) Next, put the mixture and the chicken in the pan. Then turn on the heat.

  • 次に、鍋にたれと鶏肉をいれます。それから、火をつけてください。
  • Tsugi ni, nabe ni tare to toriniku o iremasu. Sore kara, hi o tsukete kudasai.

4) When it’s boiling, turn down the flame. Let it cook for ten minutes.

  • お湯が沸騰したら、火を弱くしてください。10分間煮てください。
  • O-yu ga futtō shitara, hi o yowaku shite kudasai.

5) Turn it over and let it cook for another ten minutes.

  • ひっくり返して、また10分煮てください。
  • Hikkuri kaeshite, mata juppun nite kudasai.

4. Japanese Vocabulary and Phrases

Biling Water

Click here to learn even more Japanese words and phrases!

  • テリヤキ (teriyaki): teriyaki
  • 経つ (tatsu): to pass (time); V1
  • 煮る (niru): to cook, to boil, to simmer;V2
  • 沸騰 (futtō): boiling
  • (nabe): pot, saucepan
  • 溶ける (とける): to melt, to thaw;V2
  • たれ (tare): sauce, dipping sauce
  • (su): vinegar
  • しょうゆ (shōyu): soy sauce
  • ひっくり返す (hikkuri kaesu): to turn over, to upset;V1

5. Japanese Audio Lesson


Want to keep this lesson? Right click here and save the MP3 file.

In this lesson, you will learn how to use hajimeru, tuzukeru, and owaru in Japanese. The conversation takes place in a home economics class at school between a Japanese teacher and some students. The teacher is speaking formal Japanese to her students. The students are speaking formal Japanese with their teacher and informal Japanese to each other. We will also discuss Japanese cooking teriyaki style.
JapanesePod101 Audio Lesson

Click here to get the PDF Lesson Notes!

Visit us at JapanesePod101.com where you will find many more fantastic Japanese lessons and learning resources! Leave us a message while you are there!

Top 10 most famous Japanese Food

Click here to listen to the audio pronunciation!

https://38.media.tumblr.com/6cb8663baa52319661179f16389dc148/tumblr_inline_o5i4x93SqT1tqv1ik_500.gif

1. おでん。- Oden.

https://38.media.tumblr.com/e702aeac7b59f665d4355016fb126528/tumblr_inline_o5i55glRRr1tqv1ik_500.gif

2. しゃぶしゃぶ。- Shabu shabu

https://38.media.tumblr.com/297c7f30da5745e330717af00bf52283/tumblr_inline_o5i5diL7TL1tqv1ik_500.gif

3. 天麩羅。- Tempura.

https://33.media.tumblr.com/cf40b88472c2a80e1a06d90e00bc3a10/tumblr_inline_o5i5k6p7sw1tqv1ik_500.gif

4. 寿司。- Sushi.

https://38.media.tumblr.com/4a887624a8a46a25725bfe407d38350f/tumblr_inline_o5i8zahUUR1tqv1ik_500.gif

5. 焼き鳥。- Yakitori.

https://38.media.tumblr.com/d3c786c4326da39557e0fcde4c1521ff/tumblr_inline_o5i958PPei1tqv1ik_500.gif

6. 牛丼。- Gyudon.

https://33.media.tumblr.com/b835ce16b0a30d188423f1c136aeb63a/tumblr_inline_o5i9d3WXvU1tqv1ik_500.gif

7. 蕎麦。- Soba.

https://31.media.tumblr.com/bea3603b05a2f388732cf3f36bc838f7/tumblr_inline_o5i9n51vwa1tqv1ik_500.gif

8. 餅。- Mochi.

https://38.media.tumblr.com/8b13276dd1193276afbaa4607a74fb8a/tumblr_inline_o5i9ufEPnL1tqv1ik_500.gif

9. 納豆。- Natto.

https://38.media.tumblr.com/f4e0eaaeadc2c65e132810c56f6a2d41/tumblr_inline_o5i9z7hmim1tqv1ik_500.gif

10. おでん。- Oden.

https://33.media.tumblr.com/404b1877264126c8015345975b09136a/tumblr_inline_o5ia4aA6dI1tqv1ik_500.gif

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    5 Unique Japanese Foods

    Learn Japanese With JapanesePod101!

    Everybody’s got to eat, right?

    Right! This is why food can be a great way to connect with different cultures! Food can give us a little taste (literally) of life from around the world. When you’re traveling, one of the funnest things to do is try the local restaurants and cafes. From Asia to America, every place has a few unique snacks to munch on!

    So what are some unique foods in Japan?

    Kit Kats

    Yep, that’s right. From Green Tea to Blueberry Cheesecake, there are dozens of interesting and quirky flavors of Kit Kat bars that can be found in Japan. They even have a Wasabi flavor for those of you who are brave enough to try! Kit Kat bars have become wildly popular in Japan. The name “Kit Kat” is often associated with the phrase “Kitto Katsu,” which is a way to wish someone good luck in Japanese. Due to this, the chocolate bars are often given as gifts during celebrations and events.

    Nattō

    This infamous dish made from fermented soy beans just might be the smelliest on the list. Nattō is known for its powerful odor and gooey texture. Nattō is considered a comfort food in Japan and locals are often quick to suggest the slimy-textured food to visitors. Occasionally, nattō can be found in soup, salad, and even sushi. Nattō may taste disgusting, but it is definitely worth a try (just to say you did)!

    Learn Japanese With JapanesePod101!

    Shabu-shabu

    Another well-known dish in Japan. Thinly sliced beef is boiled in hot water at your table. The meat is fully-cooked within a few seconds and ready to eat! If prepared well, Shabu-shabu is usually very tender and juicy. It is also related to another popular Japanese dish called “sukiyaki.” There are thousands of restaurants in Japan and around the world that serve shabu-shabu, so finding a spot to try it will be a cinch!

    Learn Japanese With JapanesePod101!

    Omurice

    The Japanese version of an omelet; omurice usually consists of fried rice wrapped in a fluffy whipped egg. It is then topped with a sweet ketchup sauce. If you’re an anime fan, you may be interested in trying the dish at one of the many maid cafes around Tokyo. You can even order omurice that is cooked to resemble your favorite anime character!

    Learn Japanese With JapanesePod101!

    Fugu

    Warning: Eating this can be bad for your health! It can even kill you! No, we aren’t talking about a sugary snack or fast food…Fugu, or pufferfish, contains a deadly poison called tetrodotoxin that can literally be lethal. This is why, according to Japanese law, it has to be prepared by a licensed professional. However, fugu remains a popular dish in Japan. The risk involved with eating fugu is said to give those who try it a certain “rush.” So if you decide to try this one, be careful and find a reputable restaurant with a licensed chef. Otherwise, the risk just might outweigh the reward…

    So, what do you think? Would you try any of these 5 interesting and unique Japanese foods?

    Choose One Quiz: どちらが好きですか?(Which do you like?)

    Which do you like?
    どちらが好きですか? (Dochira ga sukidesu ka?)

    We’re having another Choose One Quiz. Which do you like, 親子丼(oyakodon) or 牛丼(gyūdon)? Choose one and let us know!

    親子丼(oyakodon) vs 牛丼(gyūdon)

    Which do you like?

    A. 親子丼(oyakodon)
    Oyakodon Is a combination of chicken, egg, green onion and various other ingredients that is put over rice to create a rice bowl. The litereal translation of this dishes name is parent-and-child-donburi.

    B. 牛丼(gyūdon)
    Gyūdon is a Japanese rice bowl that uses cooked beef and onions on top of rice. The dish may also include noodles, and commonly has a raw egg poured on top of it.

    P.S. Do you want to learn more about Japanese food?

    Click here to listen to related a lesson on JapanesePod101:
    Culture Class: Essential Japanese Vocabulary – Food

    Why Sapporo is my favorite city in Japan

    Why Sapporo is my favorite city in Japan

    わや*!That was a hard decision to make Kyushu? Okinawa? South Korea? Taiwan? No… I made it to Hokkaido and have to start this article by talking about Salmon Ikura Don (raw salmon with salmon fish eggs on rice that I ate in Sapporo), in honor of the best dish I’ve ever eaten.

    First, If you want to travel in Japan and don’t know where to start, I suggest you to take a look at this list: here

    So…why Sapporo?
    Well, my two closest Japanese friends are living there… What better reason to fly north?

    First of all, I love big cities. Tokyo is massive and I enjoy it. However, I’m still a Swiss girl from the Alps… So I was actually really excited about this trip. The image I had of Sapporo is pretty similar to the one foreigners can have of Switzerland, I guess.

    There are a few things you should know about Sapporo. It’s not only a beer brand, this is also the fifth largest city in Japan, and almost 2 million people live there! The 1972 Winter Olympic Games were hosted there and it’s famous for its yearly Snow Festival as well.

    Now let me tell you why the capital of Hokkaido Prefecture has became my favorite city in Japan, and how I managed to escape from the real world for 4 whole days (I didn’t even realize that Google had a new logo!)

  • Incredible Atmosphere
  • I’ve lived in Canada, England, and Switzerland and have been able to travel around, including to Japan. But Sapporo has something that other cities clearly don’t have! There is still that urban vibe with areas such as Susukino, as well as a Western touch with the Former Hokkaido Government office and the area around that building.

    The enormous park around the Hokkaido University reminded me of those I could relax in when in was in Toronto. The Maryuyama Park area has many bakeries, small cafės, and restaurants. I would describe this spot as fancy but cosy at the same time.

  • Beautiful Natural Surroundings
  • It is part of the atmosphere, but it needs its own paragraph. My friend took me to Mount Moiwa and the night view was breathtaking… Sapporo is a large city, so seeing all those lights sparkling from the mountain was magical, and I will simply never forget it.
    It might seem insignificant, but the city is full of flowers and greenery, and this is what is missing in Tokyo. Almost every sidewalk has colorful flowers, and you can also find them in parks and even outside people’s front doors. It’s a small detail but it makes a big difference.
    My other friend took me to Otaru, which is by the seaside north of Sapporo. It’s a small and picturesque city intersected by a river and many small boutiques.

    Finally, wherever you are in Sapporo, if the weather isn’t foggy, you can see mountains! It really reminds me of where I am from. Now I can’t wait to go back to Hokkaido during the winter time and enjoy the snow up there!

    Mount Moiwa

  • Kind People
  • The hospitality in Japan is no secret. But in Hokkaido, I was touched by the people’s kindness, generosity, and enthusiasm. I guess life is more peaceful there, so everyone takes the time to do whatever they have to. I felt relaxed from the beginning to the end. And of course, I am so thankful to my friends who were my reason for spending my precious time there.

  • Delicious Food
  • I started with food and I am ending with food. If you do love Japanese cuisine, this is a no-brainer – you just have to go to Sapporo. Curry soup is famous there. I also had the chance to eat えび味噌ラーメン (ebi miso ramen)、うに (uni), and 鮭 いくら 丼 (salmon ikura don), which as you know tasted like heaven.
    If you like cheese and milk, you won’t be disappointed in Hokkaido – just trust the girl from Switzerland, AKA ‘cheese land.’
    Food quality isn’t a problem in Sapporo, and the prices are affordable too.

    Salmon Ikura Don

    If you want to know more about Japanese food, check out this audio lesson: The 5 most popular foods in Japan

    Before visiting this northern part of Japan, I’d heard many times that Sapporo was a great city to live in. Now I totally understand why and if you are planning to go to Japan, drop by Hokkaido, because you can find pretty good deals online to get there 😉

    * わや waya is popular slang meaning ヤバイ (yabai) in Hokkaido-ben.

    Don’t forget to discover more about Japanese culture and language on https://www.japanesepod101.com

    Welcoming Our New Innovative Language Team Members

    Today, we bring you another blog post from Motoko, JapanesePod101.com lesson creator, host and Office Party Planner! Motoko will be sharing more bilingual posts on our blog, so check back often and leave a comment!

    Hi everyone, Motoko here!

    Today I’d like to tell you about the welcome party we held recently. This spring, we welcomed four new team members: Ice, Gabriella, Paloma, and Raul. To introduce them briefly, Ice is a member of the video team; Gabriella and Paloma work on content creation; and Raul is a member of our IT team.

    The welcome party was held at a Japanese shabu-shabu restaurant near our office. The restaurant’s traditional Japanese-style design was quite nice. The great service was also a pleasant surprise for us—waitresses in kimono and a waiter assisted at each table with cooking the shabu-shabu properly.

    Shabu-shabu is a type of hot pot cuisine where people cook the vegetables and meat by themselves. So diners usually put the vegetables into the hot water in the pot. Diners also pick up the finely-sliced meat (pork or beef) with their chopsticks, then cook the slices by swishing them in the hot water. The name “shabu-shabu” actually came from this swishing action, and is an onomatopoeia, as the swishing makes the sound “shabu-shabu.” Did you know that?

    At the restaurant, we did the “shabu-shabu” by ourselves. After all, that’s the most important part of having a shabu-shabu, right!? But the waiters helped us cook the other ingredients, which was very handy for the shabu-shabu beginners.

    Have you ever had shabu-shabu before? If you haven’t, please try it at least once!

    (Apr 2013)

    しゃぶしゃぶでイノベーティブ新入社員歓迎会

    こんにちは。もとこです。

    今回はイノベーティブランゲージ2013年度春に行なった歓迎会についてお話します。この春、新しく4人のメンバーが入りました。アイスさん、ガブリエラさん、パロマさん、ラウルさんです。アイスさんはビデオをつくっています。ガブリエラさんとパロマさんはレッスンをつくるスケジュール管理をしています。ラウルさんはたいせつなITの管理をしています。
     
    歓迎会ではイノベーティブの本社の近くのお店へ行きました。しゃぶしゃぶのお店です。とてもきれいな、日本らしいお店でした。サービスがとても親切で、スタッフみんなはびっくりしていました。お店の人がしゃぶしゃぶを手伝ってくれるんです。しゃぶしゃぶはおなべのお湯で野菜やお肉を料理します。自分で野菜をなべに入れます。お肉ははしでつまんで「しゃぶしゃぶ」と動かします。知っていましたか。

    お店では、「しゃぶしゃぶ」は自分でしました。(楽しいですから!)でも、野菜はお店のスタッフが料理しました。とても簡単です。
     
    みなさんはしゃぶしゃぶを食べたことありますか。ぜひ、一回食べてみてくださいね。
    (2012年4月)

    Top 5 Japanese Dishes You Have to Try!

    Sushi
    Sushi is probably the most famous Japanese food. Make your way to Tsukiji Fish Market, one of the largest fish markets in the world, for some of the freshest sushi around

    Soba and udon
    Soba, buckwheat noodles, and udon, thick noodles made from wheat, are two of the most popular types of Japanese noodles.

    Tofu
    Let’s face it; tofu doesn’t have the best reputation in the West. Even if you aren’t crazy about tofu or just can’t shake its bland, flavorless image, you’re sure to find a tofu recipe that will make you reconsider this Japanese delicacy

    Shabushabu
    Shabushabu is a dish that uses thin slices of meat dipped in boiling water or broth, which you then dip into a flavored sauce and eat.

    Ramen
    Ramen is a Japanese noodle dish that has its roots in China. It consists of a meaty broth, noodles, shredded meat, and vegetables.