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The Complete Guide for Japanese Internet Slang and Text Faces

Do you know the Japanese slang ググる (guguru)? It means “to search on Google” and is one of the most-used Japanese internet slang terms.

If you chat with your Japanese friends online or use social media such as Facebook, you might be struggling to understand Japanese internet slang terms. However, most common Japanese slang words
aren’t exclusive to the internet, as you may have found them in anime and manga as well.

The problem is that your teachers and textbooks won’t teach you those slang terms, because they aren’t official Japanese language. Japanese text slang terms might be very confusing for Japanese learners because they developed very uniquely. Japanese people also use many kinds of 顔文字 (kaomoji) or text face, such as “(*^_^*), (^_^;),(TдT).

We’ll provide you with a complete guide for popular Japanese internet slang terms and emotional text faces. Don’t worry! You don’t need to memorize it all. Even we, Japanese people, don’t know all of them. You can just add this page to your Favorite list and use it as your Japanese slang dictionary so that you can look up new slang words whenever you find them.

  1. About Japanese Internet Slang and Text Faces
  2. Top 11 Internet Slang
  3. Short and Very Short Abbreviations
  4. Text Slang for Social Media
  5. Text Slang Terms Using the Alphabet
  6. More Alphabet Slang Terms
  7. Japanese Internet Slang Using 漢字 (kanji)
  8. Slang Words for Both Conversation and Internet
  9. Emoticons: Japanese Text Faces
  10. How JapanesePod101 Can Help You Learn More Japanese

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1. About Japanese Internet Slang and Text Faces

“Internet slang” is ネットスラング (netto surangu) in Japanese. ネット (netto) is a shortened form of インターネット (intānetto) and it’s the Japanese way of reading the English word “internet.” スラング (surangu) is also the Japanese sound for the English word “slang.”

“Text face” or “text emotions” is 顔文字 (kao moji) in Japanese. 顔 (kao) means “face” and 文字 (moji) means “text” or “character.”

Today, internet and social media are very important tools, especially for young generations. If you have Japanese friends on Facebook, Instagram, and other social media, you might find it difficult to figure out what they’re saying most of the time.

What makes it so difficult? A big reason is that we have three kinds of letters, 平仮名 (hiragana), 片仮名(katakana), and 漢字 (kanji). In addition to that, we use ローマ字 (rōma ji) or the Roman alphabets, for text slang terms. Of course, there are some simple abbreviated slang words, though we have many other kinds as well. In this article, we divided Japanese internet slang terms into six types to make it easier to understand. Before we list those six types, we also listed eleven popular Japanese internet slang words. Take a look!


2. Top 11 Internet Slang

If you’re searching for the most useful Japanese internet slang, here’s a list of the top eleven most popular internet slang terms. Hopefully this list of Japanese slang words helps you find your footing in this often confusing world of foreign internet talk.

1- w (wara)

Meaning: to laugh

“w” or 笑 is the shortened form of 笑う (warau) and it means “to laugh.” It’s usually used at the end of a sentence. 笑 is a more mature way of saying this and “w” is often used by guys.

Since “to laugh” is one of the most useful Japanese text slang terms, there are many similar words. For example, “www” means “lol” in English. Sometimes, people use more w’s as in “wwwww” to express how hard they’re laughing.

Similar words:

  • 笑 (wara)
  • 草 (kusa)
  • 草生える (kusahaeru)
  • 藁 (wara)
  • ワロタ (warota)
  • ワロス (warosu)
  • 爆 (baku)

Some heavy internet users use a 漢字 (kanji) letter—草 (kusa)—to express their laughter. 草 (kusa) means “grasses” and they use this character because “w” looks like grass growing in the ground. The word 爆(baku) or 爆 (baku) is short for 爆笑 (bakushō) meaning “to burst out laughing.”

2- JK (Jēkē)

Meaning: high school girl

JK (Jēkē) is the abbreviated word for 女子高生 (Joshikōsei). 女子 (joshi) means “girl” or “younger woman.” 高生 (kōsei) is a shortened form of 高校生 (kōkōsei) that refers to a high school student. It’s often used as a sexual expression and there’s no word for a high school boy.

Similar slang words:

  • JD (Joshi Chūgakusei) 女子中学生 or junior high school girl
  • JS (Joshi Shōgakusei) 女子小学生 or elementary school girl
  • JD (Jyoshi Daisei) 女子大生 or female college student

There’s another way of using “JK” and that’s the shortened form of 常考 (jōkō) or 常識的に考えて (Jōshiki teki ni kangaete), meaning “that’s common sense.”

3- ググる (guguru)

Meaning: to google

This is a combination of グーグル (gūguru) and する (suru). グーグル (gūguru) means “Google” and する(suru) indicates the verb form. This is a very common Japanese internet slang and you might even hear it in real conversations.

The imperative form of ググる is ググれ (gugure). There’s another popular slang using ググれ and it’s “ggrks” or ググれカス which means “Google it, idiot!” This slang is used when someone asks you a really stupid question, that he/she should not ask others.

4- 乙 (otsu)

Meaning: good job; good work

乙 (otsu) is the shortest text slang for お疲れ様です (otsukare sama desu) or “Thank you for your hard work.” This is the Common Japanese slang phrase to use when thanking someone for their hard work or good work. Japanese people use it very often, even as just a way of a greeting, like “Hi!”

There are some other short ways of saying お疲れ様です (otsukare sama desu):

  • お疲れ様 (otsukare sama)
  • おつかれ (otsukare)

The shorter word is the more informal way of saying this. The kanji 乙 doesn’t have the meaning of お疲れ様です, but people use it anyway because the pronunciation is おつ (otsu).

5- 888 (pachi-pachi-pachi)

Meaning: clap, clap, clap

The sound of a number of “8”s is はち (hachi) or ぱち (pachi) in Japanese and the sound of clapping hands is パチパチパチ (pachi-pachi-pachi). Therefore, the sound of “8” and the sound of clapping hands are the same. It’s usually used with three characters of 8, like “888.” If you want to denote more clapping, you can write more 8’s like “88888.”

6- orz

Meaning: disappointment

The word “orz” is an ASCII art which represents the shape of a person bowing down, showing a feeling of disappointment. The letter of “o” is a head, “r” is hand and body, and “z” is the bent legs.

Since this is an ASCII art, there’s no fixed way of reading “orz.” Some people read it as オーズ (ōzu) and others as オルツ (orutsu).

Same meaning: crz; OTL; or2; on_

7- DQN (dokyun)

Pronunciations: D=Do; Q=kyu; N=n
Meaning: stupid, idiot

“DQN” is not an abbreviation word. It means stupid or an idiot who acts without any thinking. This word is spread from a popular Japanese textboard “2ch” or “2ちゃんねる (ni channeru).” You need to be careful when you use it because it’s a very offensive swear word.

8- 飯テロ (meshi tero)

Meaning: food terror

飯テロ (meshi tero) is a very popular and well-known Japanese internet slang. 飯 (meshi) means food or meal and テロ (tero) means “terror” or “terrorist.” 飯テロ (meshi tero) expresses the act of uploading pictures of an appetizing meal on social media such as Twitter, especially late at night. It makes people angry because they’ll be hungry and want to eat the meal.

9- リア充 (riajū)

Meaning: fulfilled person in real life

リア充(riajū) is a very popular slang word that spread from the internet. It’s the abbreviated form of リアルが充実している (riaru ga jūjitsu site iru). リアル (riaru) means “real world” and the antonym is “internet world.” 充実している (jūjitsu site iru) means “one’s life is fullfilling.”

リア充 (riajū) people have a girlfriend/boyfriend as well as many friends who hang out at school or a workplace. They also have good hobbies and are very active.

Antonym words: 非リア充 (hiriajū)

10- KY (kēwai)

Meaning: A person who cannot read the mood

KY (kēwai) is a very common Japanese internet and text slang that people also use in real conversations. You might see it on TV shows and in movies and books. It’s an abbreviation of 空気読めない (kūki yomenai). 空気 (kūki) means “air” or “mood” and 読めない (yomenai) is “cannot read.”

11- ディスる (disuru)

Meaning: to insult somebody

ディス is an abbreviation of the English word “disrespect” and する means “to do” in Japanese. The word ディスる (disuru) means “to insult somebody.” This word is also a very popular Japanese slang that’s used often in daily conversations.


3. Short and Very Short Abbreviations

There are some simple Japanese text slang terms such as おめ (ome) and あり (ari), and they are just a very short form of Japanese words. There are no complicated rules.

These words are usually spread by gamers and teenagers, because they want to type as fast or with as few characters as they can when they chat online.

1- おめ (ome)

Abbreviation of おめでとう (omedetō)

Meaning: congratulations

  • Example:
    • 誕生日おめ! (Tanjōbi ome!)
  • Meaning:
    • Happy birthday!

2- あり (ari)

Abbreviation of ありがとう (arigatō)

Meaning: thank you

  • Example:
    • A: 誕生日おめ! (Tanjōbi ome!)
    • B: あり!(Ari!)
  • Meaning:
    • A: Happy birthday!
    • B: Thanks!

3- おこ (oko)

Abbreviation of 怒る (okoru)

Meaning: to get angry

Sometimes it’s written in 片仮名 (katakana) as オコ (oko), but in 平仮名 (hirakgana) おこ (oko) is very popular. When young Japanese people use おこ (oko), it’s usually as a joke.

  • Example:
    • 無視されたよ。おこだわー。(Mushi sareta yo. Oko da wā.)
  • Meaning:
    • She/he ignored me. I’m angry.

Young people also use 激おこ (geki oko) and 激おこぷんぷん丸 (geki oko punpun maru). 激 means “extremely” and therefore, 激おこ means “to get very angry.” 激おこぷんぷん丸 (geki oko punpun maru) is the more extreme version of 激おこ (geki oko).

4- りょ (ryo)

Abbreviation of 了解です (ryōkai desu)

Meaning: OK! or roger

了解です (ryōkai desu) is a business term and it means “I understand.” But the slang word りょ (ryo) is very casual and can be used only with friends.

Some people use a much shorter version and use only a single character り(ri). “りょ (ryo) spread from online game players, but now young people also use it at LINE. There are many LINE stickers using this word.

  • Example:
    • A: コーヒー買ってきて。(Kōhī katte kite.)
    • B: りょ
  • Meaning:
    • A: Can you buy a coffee for me?
    • B: OK.


4. Text Slang for Social Media

When you use social medias like Twitter, Facebook, Instagram, and YouTube, you need the knowledge of text slang terms, because it’s everywhere. They’re common especially on Twitter, because there’s a character limit and phrases need to be made shorter. Here, let’s look at Japanese text slang terms which are often used on the internet.

1- △ (sankakkei)

Meaning: Mr. ~ is cool

△ stands for a triangle shape and it’s 三角形 in Japanese. The pronunciation of 三角形 is sankakukei but people often pronounce it sankakkei. The sound of san is the same as さん, which is the most common honorific for other people. For example, Mr. Tanaka is 田中 (Tanaka) san in Japanese.

The sound kakkei is very similar to かっけー(kakkē). かっけー(kakkē) is a slang word of かっこいい(kakkoii) that means “cool” and is often used for males. △ is used with someone’s name, usually a celebrity or popular anime character.

  • Example:
    • 本田△ (Honda-san kakkē)
  • Meaning:
    • Mr. Honda is cool.

2- なう/ナウ (nau)

Meaning: doing it right now; being there right now

This is a very popular Japanese slang, used even by some elderly people. なう or ナウ is almost the same sound as the English word “now.” This word is often used on social media sites such as Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram. When they post something on those social media sites, it means that they’re doing something at exactly that moment.

  • Example 1:
    • カラオケなう (karaoke nau)
  • Meaning:
    • I’m singing karaoke now.
  • Example 2:
    • 京都なう(Kyōto nau)
  • Meaning:
    • I’m in Kyoto now.

3- ようつべ (youtube)

Meaning: YouTube

If you type ようつべ in the Roman alphabet, you’ll easily know what it means. ようつべ (youtube) is Japanese slang for YouTube. This is very casual slang that only a limited number of people use.

4- オワコン (owakon)

Meaning: out of date; old items

This is an abbreviation for 終わったコンテンツ (Owatta kontentsu). 終わった (owatta) means “out of date” or “too old” and コンテンツ (kontentsu) means contents such as websites, anime, YouTube, TV programs, and movies. It’s originally spread from animation fans. Today, it’s very popular and is even used in real conversations.

5- ツィ (tsui)

Meaning: tweet on Twitter

It’s just an abbreviation of ツイート (tsuīto) which means “tweet” in English. It’s also used as a short form of ツイッター(tsuittā) which means Twitter. This slang is especially used among young people under the age of twenty-five.

6- サムネ (samune)

Meaning: thumbnail image

It’s a shortened form of サムネイル (samuneiru) and means “thumbnail images.” This is a frequently used Japanese slang phrase on video-sharing websites such as YouTube.

7- クラスタ (kurasuta)

Meaning: fun group

クラスタ (kurasta) means a fun group of something, such as animes and idol groups. The word クラスタ is originally from the English word “cluster.” It originally spread from 2ch; however, people don’t use it at 2ch anymore. Now, it’s used more on social media.

8- ずっ友 (zuttomo)

Meaning: friends for life

ずっ友 (zuttomo) is an abbreviation of ずっと友達 (zutto tomodachi). ずっと (zutto) means “forever” and 友達 (tomodachi) means “friends.” It was originally used by teenage girls when they took photos in a プリクラ (purikura) which is similar to a photo booth.

9- 炎上 (enjō)

Meaning: to go up in flames on social media

炎上 (enjō) is “flaming” and when people use this as an internet slang, it means that someone’s flaming on social media, or criticized by many people.

10- バズる (bazuru)

Meaning: to make a buzz on the internet

バズる (bazuru) means to make a buzz on the internet, usually Twitter and YouTube. バズ (buzu) is originally from the English word “buzz” and する (suru) is “to do.” As you can see, the popular Japanese internet slang バズる (bazuru) is a combination of those two words.

11- ラブリツ (raburitsu)

Meaning: Like and retweet on Twitter

ラブリツ (raburitsu) is only used on Twitter and usually by young teenage girls. ラブ (rabu)” is “love” in English, and it means “to press the Like button.”

Why do we use “love” instead of “like”? It’s because the Like button on Twitter is a love heart shape. リツ is a shortened form of リツイート (ritsuīto) and it means “to retweet.” If someone writes ラブリツ on Twitter, it means he/she wants you to press the Like button and retweet the tweet.

12- リプ (ripu)

Meaning: to reply

リプ (ripu) is a simple abbreviation for リプライ (ripurai). It means “to reply” and it’s usually used by teenage girls on social media like Twitter and LINE.

13- 拡散希望 (kakusan kibō)

Meaning: please share or retweet the information

You see 拡散希望 (kakusan kibō) on social media such as Twitter and Facebook. 拡散 means “to spread” and 希望 (kibō) means “hope” or “wish.” When you combine those two words, it means “Please share the message.”


5. Text Slang Terms Using the Alphabet

Texting

On the internet, Japanese people also use alphabet slang words, because many of them use the Roman alphabet for typing. One of the most unique Japanese text slangs using alphabet is to write only the consonant letters, with vowels omitted. This type of Japanese text slang spread from 2ch.

You need to be careful since this alphabet type of text slangs are only used on the internet. Therefore, it’s not as popular as other slang terms we introduced above.

1- wktk (wakuteka)

Meaning: very excited

“wktk” is an acronym of the onomatopoeia words ワクワク (wakuwaku) which means “exciting” and テカテカ (tekateka) which means “shining.” It spread from 2ch and it’s well-known among heavy internet users, such as gamers. However, you need to be careful when using this slang, as it’s not very popular among other people.

2- gkbr (gakuburu)

Meaning: to tremble for fear

“gkbr” is an acronym of the onomatopoeia words ガクガク (gakugaku) and ブルブル (buruburu). Both onomatopoeia words describe trembling for fear, so this Japanese internet slang describes someone’s fear. This word is also spread from 2ch and is used by heavy internet users.

You need to be careful because some people use “gkbr” as an acronym for ごきぶり (gokiburi) meaning “cockroach.” Popular internet slang for cockroach is “G()”, and using “gkbr” is a rare case.

3- ksk (kasoku)

Meaning: Faster!

“ksk” is an acronym for 加速 (kasoku), which means “accelerate.” This frequently used Japanese internet slang word is also spread from 2ch and used at textboards and the video distribution site ニコニコ動画(niconico dōga). It’s usually used when someone wants people to write comments faster.

4- kwsk (kuwashiku)

“kwsk” is an acronym for 詳しく (kuwashiku). The word 詳しく (kuwashiku) means “in detail,” and “kwsk” means “Explain the detail, please.”


6. More Alphabet Slang Terms

We’ve gone through a lot of Japanese slang words already, but our list of Japanese slang words wouldn’t be complete without the following. Hang tight!

1- ktkr (きたこれ) (kita kore)

Meaning: It’s here!; Something exciting happened.

“ktkr” is an abbreviated form of キタコレ (kita kore) which is also an internet slang word. キタ (kita) is 来た in kanji form. It’s the past tense form of 来る (kuru) which means “to come.” The official form of コレ is in 平仮名 (hiragana) form—これ (kore)—and means “this” or “it.” In this popular Japanese slang, これ (kore) means “some event or occurrence you expect” and 来た (kita) means “happened.”

2- mjk (まじか) (majika)

Meaning: Really?

“mjk” is an abbreviated form of マジか (majika). マジ (maji) is a very popular Japanese slang which is especially used among young Japanese people and it means “Really?” or “seriously.” There are several forms of マジ (maji). When you ask a question, you use マジ? or マジで? マジか isn’t usually used as a question, but it’s more likely to be used to express surprise.

3- (ry (略) (ryaku)

Meaning: OK! or roger

“(ry” stands for 略 (ryaku), and 略 is an abbreviation for 省略 (shōryaku). It’s used when you want to shorten a sentence, which others may already know.

4- kaos (カオス) (kaosu)

Meaning: chaos

“kaos” is an abbreviation for カオス (kaosu). The Japanese word カオス (kaosu) is originally from the English word “chaos” and it has the same meaning.

5- おK (オーケー) (ōkē)

Meaning: OK

The alphabet “o” is おー in 平仮名 (hiragana) form. The macron “ー” is omitted.

6- うp (アップ) (appu or upu)

Meaning: to upload

Japanese people often use the English word “up.” “u” is the Roman alphabet form of the 平仮名 (hiragana) letter う, and う is used instead of “u.”


7. Japanese Internet Slang Using 漢字 (kanji)

Some internet text slangs are only used in 漢字 (kanji) or Chinese characters. Some of them are abbreviation forms of words using only kanji. There’s also some kanji slang which uses the same sound of kanji, but with different meanings as a kind of joke. Here, we list popular kanji slang words and their meaning.

1- 誰得 (daretoku)

Meaning: Who benefits from it?

  • Abbreviation of 誰が得するんだよ (dare ga toku suru n da yo)

2- 情弱 (jōjaku)

Meaning: People who are left behind by information on the internet

  • Abbreviation of 情報弱者 (jōhō jakusha)

3- 胸熱 (muneatsu)

Meaning: to become fraught with emotion

  • Abbreviation of 胸が熱くなる (mune ga atsuku naru)

4- 禿同 (hagedō)

Meaning: strong agreement

  • Abbreviation of 激しく同意 (hageshiku dōi)
  • 禿 means “bald” and plays a word game by using the same sound of kanji

5- 今北 (imakita)

Meaning: I’m here, now.

  • 今来た is the correct kanji. 北 (kita) means “north” and shares the same pronunciation as 来た. 今北” looks like someone’s family name.
  • There’s also the slang 今北産業 (imakita sangyō), which sounds like a company’s name. But it means “I’m here, now. So please explain what is happening in three sentences.” 三行 (san-gyō) which means “three sentences” is the same sound as 産業.

6- 鯖 (saba)

Meaning: internet server

  • The kanji of 鯖 means “mackerel.” It’s used because it has a similar sound.


8. Slang Words for Both Conversation and Internet

Person Messaging on Phone

Some common Japanese slang phrases have become very popular so that they’re also used in real-life conversations, especially among young people. The opposite is also true: Sometimes slang terms from real conversations spread to internet text conversations. Here’s a list of some popular Japanese slang terms that are used both on the internet and in real-life conversations.

1- ガチ (gachi)

Meaning: earnestly

  • Abbreviation of ガチンコ (gachinko)

2- クソゲー (kusogē)

Meaning: stupid game

  • ゲー is the abbreviated form of ゲーム

3- メシウマ (meshiuma)

Meaning: to get happy for the misfortune of another

  • メシ is “meal” and ウマ is a shortened form of うまい that means “taste good.”

4- ドヤ顔 (doyagao)

Meaning: smug face

5- 神ってる (kamitteru)

Meaning: heaven-sent; out of this world

6- チキる (chikiru)

Meaning: to chicken out

  • チキ is the abbreviated form of チキン (chikin) or “chicken” in English

7- それな (sorena)

Meaning: express sympathy to others

8- 推しメン (oshimen)

Meaning: favorite member of idol group

  • Abbreviation of イチ推しメンバー (ichioshi menbā)

9- イケメン (ikemen)

Meaning: good-looking; hottie


9. Emoticons: Japanese Text Faces

If you search 顔文字 (kaomoji) or 絵文字 (emoji) on the internet, you’ll find several kinds of them. In Japanese, sometimes expression tends to be unclear, not helped by the fact that there are some words that have the same meanings. Therefore, it’s sometimes difficult to express exact emotion. In those situations, text faces help to express emotions. Text emotions are usually used at the end of a sentence. Many people use them in their emails and when chatting online.

Those text faces are largely used by teenagers, but are also used by a broad age group. However, you can’t use those text faces in business emails.

Here’s a list of Japanese text faces:

  • Smile : (^^), (^_^), (^o^), (^-^),(●^o^●), (*^_^*)
  • V sign: (^_^)V, (^o^)V
  • Crying: (T_T), (;_;),.・゚゚・(/ω\)・゚゚・.
  • Be excited: o(^o^)o
  • Love: (*♡∀♡),╰(*´︶`*)╯♡
  • Bowing or apology: m(_ _)m
  • Goodbye: (^_^)/~~~
  • Embarrassment: (^^;),(^_^;),(*ノωノ)
  • Joy: \( ̄▽ ̄)/, (⌒▽⌒)☆, ヽ(o^ ^o)ノ
  • Troubled: (>__
  • Sleeping: (-_-)zzz
  • Confused: (°_°),
  • Wink: (^_-), (^_-)-☆
  • Deflated: (´・ω・`), (‘A`)
  • Angry: ( ` ω ´ ), (#`Д´)


10. How JapanesePod101 Can Help You Learn More Japanese

In summary, we’ve listed popular Japanese internet slang terms and text faces. We hope you enjoyed it and that it helps you communicate more effectively with your Japanese friends online.

If you liked this article, feel free to get more fun lessons of Japanese expressions and cultures on JapanesePod101. We provide over 2950 audio and video lessons and help you study Japanese with a 360° approach. We make your Japanese learning fun and easy! Study with us!

In the meantime, make good use of your newfound knowledge in common Japanese texting and internet slang. Good luck!

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How to Say “My Name is,” in Japanese and More!

When you’re learning Japanese and starting to make new friends, or visiting Japan for travel, school, or business, there will be many occasions where you need to introduce yourself. Introducing yourself is always important in starting a good relationship with someone: friends, peers, students, co-workers, neighbors, etc.

Hence, it’s important to learn things like how to say “My name is,” in Japanese, as well as other ways of introducing yourself in Japanese phrases.

There are some tips to keep in mind when it comes to introducing yourself in Japan, from a cultural perspective. For example, you should usually use a formal and polite style of Japanese when you introduce yourself, and it’s better not to talk about yourself too much or give too many personal details right away.

Ready to learn how to introduce yourself and learn Japanese with us? Here’s our list of practical phrases and tips for introducing yourself in Japanese words.

P.S., you can find more information on how to introduce yourself in Japanese business on our site!

Table of Contents

  1. Identifying Yourself
  2. Stating Your Name
  3. Stating Your Age
  4. Stating Where You’re From
  5. Placing Yourself in Society
  6. Sharing Personal Details
  7. Conclusion: How JapanesePod101 Can Help You Learn More Japanese

Log


1. Identifying Yourself

1- Greeting

The first thing you do when meeting someone, before introducing yourself, is offer them a greeting. There’s also a greeting word the Japanese use to close an introduction, which we’ll familiarize you with below. These can also be good ways of how to introduce yourself in Japanese interviews.

1. はじめまして。

Romanization: Hajimemashite.
English Translation: Nice to meet you.

When you first meet someone, Hajimemashite, or “Nice to meet you” in Japanese, is the first word of greeting. Hajimemashite means to start knowing someone new or to start a new relationship with someone. Essentially, it’s a good way to introduce yourself in Japanese.

This term is formal and can be used for any occasion. For a very official occasion, there’s another way to say “Nice to meet you,” more politely and with respect: お会いできて光栄です。(O-ai dekite kōei desu.). Keep in mind that this may be a good phrase for how to introduce yourself in Japanese email.

Example:

  • はじめまして。私はマリコです。
    Hajimemashite. Watashi wa Mariko desu.
    Nice to meet you. I am Mariko.

Note: Watashi wa meaning in Japanese is “(as for) me.”

2. よろしくお願いします。

Romanization: Yoroshiku onegai shimasu.
English Translation: Please treat me well.

This is used at the end of an introduction, after you’ve finished introducing yourself. It actually has many meanings, but in this case, it means “Please treat me well,” or “Please be nice/kind to me.” This may sound awkward in English, but it’s an important greeting phrase in Japan to show your gratitude and humbleness, especially in hoping to have a good relationship with that person. In a casual situation, you can just say Yoroshiku as a shortened version.

Example:

  • 今日からここで働きます鈴木です。よろしくお願いします。
    Kyō kara koko de hatarakimasu Suzuki desu. Yoroshiku onegai shimasu.
    I am Suzuki and I start work here today. Please be good to me.

Greeting

When you greet and introduce yourself for the first time, most of the time you should bow and shake hands.


2. Stating Your Name

Learning how to say your name is an essential aspect of Japanese introductions, especially when it comes to how to introduce yourself in Japanese for interview. Following Hajimemashite, it’s very common to state your name to start your introduction in Japanese. There are a few ways to say your name in Japanese.

1- 私はユミです。

Romanization: Watashi wa Yumi desu.
English Translation: I am Yumi.

This is the most common phrase to tell someone your name.

  • Watashi = I
  • wa = am / is / are
  • desu = This is a Japanese 述語 (Jutsugo) or predicate in a polite style, which is added to the end of a sentence.

2- 私はユミと言いいます。

Romanization: Watashi wa Yumi to iimasu.
English Translation: I am called Yumi.

This is another typical way to say your name in Japanese. It literally means “I am said to be Yumi.”

  • iimasu = This is a conjugated form of 言う (iu ) which means “to say.”
  • To = This is a Japanese postpositional particle which means “as” in this case.

This phrase sounds a bit more formal. In order to say it even more politely for an official occasion, you can say mōshimasu instead of iimasu, which is the respectful form (Keigo 敬語 ) of “say” in Japanese.

3- 私の名前はユミです。

Romanization: Watashi no namae wa Yumi desu.
English Translation: My name is Yumi.

When you’re asked “What is your name?”, you can answer with this phrase.

  • no = of
  • namae = name
  • Watashi no namae = my name

4- ユーミンと呼んでください。

Romanization: Yūmin to yonde kudasai.
English Translation: Please call me Yūmin.

If you have a nickname or あだ名 (adana) which is different from your real name, you can use this phrase after introducing your actual name.

  • yonde = This is a conjugation of 呼ぶ (yobu) which means “to call.”
  • kudasai = This is a Japanese Jutsugo (述語) or predicate in a polite style which means “please (call me)” in this case.


3. Stating Your Age

It’s not very common to state your age to a person you meet for the first time, especially if you’re an adult woman. In some situations, however, you’re expected to introduce your age or when you were born. On such occasions, here are some expressions for how to state your age.

1- 私は16歳です。

Romanization: Watashi wa 16-sai desu.
English Translation: I am 16 years old.

  • sai is “year(s) old.”
  • For Japanese numbers, please visit here for more details.
  • You can use any Japanese number to say “XX years old,” except for twenty.
    • “Twenty” is ni-jū as a Japanese number, but it’s read as はたち (hatachi) only when it’s expressed as an age.

2- 私は今年25歳になります。

Romanization: Watashi wa kotoshi 25-sai ni narimasu.
English Translation: I become 25 years old this year.

  • kotoshi is “this year.”
  • ni is a Japanese particle which is usually used to indicate destination or direction. In this case, it indicates the result of change.
  • narimasu is a conjugated form of なる (naru) which means “to become.”

3- 私は1990年生まれです。

Romanization: Watashi wa 1990-nen umare desu.
English Translation: I was born in 1990.

You can also express your age by stating the year of your birth. This phrase is a common answer when you’re asked when you were born, in situations such as confirming your legal age when you buy cigarettes or alcohol (the legal age for these is twenty in Japan).

  • nen is “year.”
  • umare is “was born” in noun form.
  • In order to express a year, unlike in English, the Japanese say the whole number.
    • For example, “1990″ in Japanese numbers is read “one-thousand nine-hundred ninety” in Japanese, which is sen kyū-hyaku kyū-jū.


4. Stating Where You’re From

When thinking about how to introduce yourself in a Japanese job interview, in particular, you should learn how to talk about where you’re from. Different regions have different features. It’s common to state where you’re from in your introduction in Japan. When you find that someone is from the same city or region of your city, it makes it easier to familiarize yourselves with each other.

1- 私は東京出身です。

Romanization: Watashi wa Tōkyō shusshin desu.
English Translation: I am from Tokyo.

  • shusshin is a noun word which means “come from” or “a place of one’s origin.”
  • If you’re a foreign person in Japan, state your country.

2- 私はカナダ人です。

Romanization: Watashi wa Canada-jin desu.
English Translation: I am Canadian.

  • You can also state your nationality or ethnicity instead of the country you’re from.
  • jin denotes nationality when it’s attached to the name of a country.

3- 私は大阪に住んでいます。

Romanization: Watashi wa Ōsaka ni sunde imasu.
English Translation: I live in Osaka.

  • You can also mention where you reside now.
  • Sunde imasu is a conjugated form of 住む (sumu) which means “(I am) living.”


When you’re from another country, it’s nice to introduce which country/region you’re from.


5. Placing Yourself in Society

1- Stating Your School and Major [for Students]

1. 私は東京大学に通っています。

Romanization: Watashi wa Tōkyō Daigaku ni kayotte imasu.
English Translation: I go to Tokyo University.

  • daigaku is “university.”
  • kayotte imasu is a conjugated form of 通う (kayō) which means “(I am) going” when talking about a place where you constantly and repeatedly go.
  • Vocabulary related to school:
    - 大学 (Daigaku) — University
    - 短期大学 (Tanki daigaku) — Junior college
    - 専門学校 (Senmon gakkō) — Vocational school / Technical school
    - 高校 (Kōkō) — High school
    - 中学校 (Chūgakkō) — Middle high school
    - 小学校 (Shōgakkō) — Elementary school

2. 私は経済学を学んでいます。

Romanization: Watashi wa keizaigaku o manande imasu.
English Translation: I study economics.

  • keizai is “economics” and gaku denotes a subject.
  • Vocabulary related to subjects:
    - 経営 (Keiei) — Business management
    - 法律 (Hōritsu) — Law
    - 生物 (Seibutsu) — Biology
    - 国際関係 (Kokusai kankei) — International relations
    - 情報技術 (Jōhō gijutsu) — Information technology
    - 金融 (Kinyū) — Finance
    - 芸術 (Geijutsu) — Art
    - 心理学 (Shinrigaku) — Psychology

2- Stating Your Profession [for Workers]

1. 私は看護師です。

Romanization: Watashi wa kangoshi desu.
English Translation: I am a nurse.

  • Put the word for your occupation where the underlined word is in the example.
  • Vocabulary related to occupation:
    - 看護師 (Kangoshi) — Nurse
    - コンピュータープログラマー (Konpyūtā puroguramā) — Computer programmer
    - 医者 (Isha) — Doctor
    - 先生 (Sensei) — Teacher
    - 販売員 (Hanbaiin) — Shop staff
    - 会計士 (Kaikeishi) — Accountant
    - スポーツインストラクター (Supōtsu insutorakutā) — Sports instructor
    - 美容師 (Biyōshi) — Hairdresser

2. 私は銀行で働いています。

Romanization: Watashi wa ginkō de hataraite imasu.
English Translation: I work at a bank.

This is another phrase used to mention where you work.

  • de means “at.”
  • hataraite imasu is a conjugated form of 働く (hataraku) which means “(I am) working.”
  • Vocabulary related to where you work:
    - 銀行 (Ginkō) — Bank
    - 会社 (Kaisha) — Company [general term]
    - 貿易会社 (Bōekigaisha) — Trading company
    - 広告会社 (Kōkokugaisha) — Advertising company
    - 建築事務所 (Kenchiku jimusho) — Architectural firm
    - アパレル会社 (Aparerugaisha) — Apparel/clothing company
    - 病院 (Byōin) — Hospital
    - レストラン (Resutoran) — Restaurant
    - デパート (Depāto) — Department store

In Japan, people often introduce themselves by saying which company they work for, but it’s also nice to explain what you do for work as a profession.


6. Sharing Personal Details

1- Information About Your Family and Pets

Here’s some information on how to introduce yourself and your family in Japanese! After all, family is a universal topic and one that’s so important.

1. 私は5人家族です。

Romanization: Watashi wa go-nin kazoku desu.
English Translation: I have a family of five members.

It’s common to say how many members are in your family. Put the number of members in your family in place of the underlined go (”five̶ ;) in the example sentence.

  • nin is a counter word used to count people, which means “person,” and it’s attached after a number.
  • kazoku means “family.”

2. 私は姉と弟がいます。

Romanization: Watashi wa ane to otōto ga imasu.
English Translation: I have a big sister and a younger brother.

You can also introduce how many brothers and sisters you have. For more details about family, please visit Family in Japan.

  • ane means “older sister.”
  • otōto means “younger brother.”
  • imasu is a conjugated form of いる (iru) which means “there is/are” in a polite style.

3. 私は犬を飼っています。

Romanization: Watashi wa inu o katte imasu.
English Translation: I have a dog.

  • inu means “dog.”
  • o indicates an object.
  • katte imasu is a conjugated form of 飼う (kau) which means “(I am) keeping and raising (animals).”
  • Vocabulary related to pets:
    - 犬 (Inu) — Dog
    - ハムスター (Hamusutā) — Hamster
    - 小鳥 (Kotori) — Small bird(s)
    - ヘビ (Hebi) — Snake
    - うさぎ (Usagi) — Rabbit
    - ねこ (Neko) — Cat

Pet
Your pet is a part of your family, so please do mention them!

2- Describing Hobbies

1. 私の趣味は登山です。

Romanization: Watashi no shumi wa tozan desu.
English Translation: My hobby is climbing mountains.

It’s always nice to introduce what you like to do in your free time in order to let people know more about you. It’s common to share information about your hobbies in Japan, unless it’s too personal (such as political or religious activities).

  • Watashi no means “my.”
  • shumi means “hobby.”
  • Vocabulary related to hobbies:
    - 登山 (Tozan) — Climbing mountains
    - 映画鑑賞 (Eiga kanshō) — Watching movies
    - 写真 (Shashin) — Photography
    - 旅行 (Ryokō) — Traveling
    - マンガ (Manga) — Comics
    - スキー (Skī) — Ski
    - サーフィン (Sāfin) — Surfing

2. 私はサッカーが得意です。

Romanization: Watashi wa sakkā ga tokui desu.
English Translation: I am good at soccer.

You can also introduce what is you’re good at. Insert a suitable vocabulary word in the underlined part of the example sentence.

  • tokui is a noun that means “being good at.”
  • Vocabulary related to things you’re good at:
    - スポーツ (Supōtsu) — Sports
    - プログラミング (Puroguramingu) — Programming
    - デザイン (Dezain) — Designing
    - 歌うこと (Utau koto) — Singing
    - 料理 (Ryōri) — Cooking
    - 楽器の演奏 (Gakki no ensō) — Playing instruments
    - ゲーム (Gēmu) — Game

3- Describing Your Favorite Foods

1. 私はラーメンが好きです。

Romanization: Watashi wa rāmen ga suki desu.
English Translation: I like ramen.

Food is always an easy topic to talk about and can expand any conversation. Insert a suitable vocabulary word in the underlined part of the example sentence.
 

  • suki means “like.”
  • ga indicates an object.
  • Vocabulary related to food:
    - 日本食 (Nihonshoku) — Japanese cuisine
    - 中華料理 (Chūka ryōri) — Chinese cuisine
    - 韓国料理 (Kankoku ryōri) — Korean cuisine
    - イタリア料理 (Itaria ryōri) — Italian cuisine
    - フランス料理 (Furansu ryōri) — French cuisine
    - メキシコ料理 (Mekishiko ryōri) — Mexican cuisine
    - 焼肉 (Yakiniku) — Japanese BBQ
    - カツ丼 (Katsudon) — Pork cutlet bowl
    - お好み焼き (Okonomiyaki) — Japanese pancake
    - 果物 (Kudamono) — Fruits
    - 甘いもの (Amai mono) — Sweets


Talking about food can expand conversations, and it’s a good and easy topic to talk about.

4- Describing Your SNS (Social Network Service)

1. 私はインスタグラムを使っています。

Romanization: Watashi wa Insutaguramu o tsukatte imasu.
English Translation: I use Instagram.

When introducing yourself during a casual occasion, such as when you’re trying to make new friends, you can make mention of your SNS to connect with them.

  • o indicates an object.
  • tsukatte imasu is a conjugated form of tsukau (使う) which means “(I am) using.”
  • Insert the name of an SNS, such as Facebook, LinkedIn, etc., in the underlined part of the example sentence.

This is a great way of introducing yourself to a Japanese friend!

2. 私のユーザー名はsakura123です。

Romanization: Watashi no yūzāmei wa sakura123 desu.
English Translation: My username is sakura123.

If you’re introducing yourself to a friend in Japanese and want them to search for your SNS account and add you as a friend, this phrase is useful.

  • yūzā is a Japanese version of how to say “user.”
  • mei is “name.”
  • Insert the name of your account in the underlined part of the example sentence.

3. 私はブログを書いています

Romanization: Watashi wa burogu o kaite imasu.
English Translation: I write a blog.

  • o indicates an object.
  • kaite imasu is a conjugated form of 書く (kaku) which means “(I am) writing.”


7. Conclusion: How JapanesePod101 Can Help You Learn More Japanese

I hope this article on introducing yourself in Japanese is helpful and that it makes your communication with Japanese people more enjoyable! Hopefully you can now see that knowing how to introduce yourself in Japanese language learning is essential.

Which of these Japanese greetings did you find most useful? Why not practice introducing yourself in Japanese by writing out a self-introductory paragraph in Japanese in the comments? We’d love to hear from you!

If you’d like to learn more Japanese, you’ll find more useful content on JapanesePod101.com. We provide a variety of free lessons for you to improve your Japanese language skills. For example, 10 Lines You Need for Introducing Yourself is useful for practicing your Japanese introduction with audio.

We also have a YouTube channel: JapanesePod101. It’s always fun to learn Japanese language by watching videos and listening to actual Japanese pronunciation. And don’t forget to check out our free vocabulary lists and more blog posts like this one to help you gain insight into Japanese culture and the language!

Know that your determination will pay off, and we’ll be here for each step of your language-learning journey with support and useful tools!

Log

How to Say I Love You in Japanese - Romantic Word List

Do you often feel lonely and sad? Do you long for romance and are willing to do whatever it takes to meet that special person? Speaking another language could revolutionize your love life! So, why wait? Learning how to say ‘love’ in Japanese could be just what you need to find it.

Or perhaps you were lucky, and have found your Japanese partner already. Fantastic! Yet, a cross-cultural relationship comes with unique challenges. Learning how to speak your lover’s language will greatly improve your communication and enhance the relationship. At JapanesePod101, our team will teach you all the words, quotes and phrases you need to woo your Japanese lover with excellence! Our tutors provide personal assistance, with plenty of extra material available to make Japanese dating easy for you.

Table of Contents

  1. Common Phrases You’ll Need for a Date
  2. The Most Romantic Ideas for a Date
  3. Must-know Valentine’s Day Vocabulary
  4. Japanese Love Phrases for Valentine’s Day
  5. Japanese Quotes about Love
  6. Marriage Proposal Lines
  7. 15 Most Common Break-Up Lines
  8. Will Falling in Love Help You Learn Japanese Faster?

Start with a bonus, and download the ‘How To be a Good Lover Cheat Sheet’ for FREE! (Logged-In Member Only)

Log in to Download Your Free Cheat Sheet - How to be a Good Lover in Japanese

1. Common Phrases You’ll Need for a Date

So, you have met your Japanese love interest. Congratulations! Who knows where this could take you…?! However, the two of you have just met and you’re not ready to say the Japanese word for love just yet. Great, it is better to get to know him/her first. Wow your prospective love by using these Japanese date phrases to set up a spectacular first date.

Japanese Date Phrases

Would you like to go out to dinner with me?

  • あなたは私と一緒に夕食に出かけたいですか?
  • anata wa watashi to issho ni yūshoku ni dekaketai desu ka?

The important question! In most cultures, this phrase indicates: ‘I’m romantically interested in you’. Flirting in Japanese is no different, so don’t take your date to Mcdonald’s!

Are you free this weekend?

  • この週末は暇ですか。
  • kono shūmatsu wa hima desu ka?

This is a preamble to asking your love interest on a date. If you get an immediate ‘Yes’, that’s good news!

Would you like to hang out with me?

  • 私と一緒にブラブラしたいですか?
  • watashi to issho ni burabura shitai desu ka?

You like her/him, but you’re not sure if there’s chemistry. Ask them to hang out first to see if a dinner date is next.

What time shall we meet tomorrow?

  • 明日、何時に会いましょうか?
  • ashita nanji ni aimashō ka?

Set a time, and be sure to arrive early! Nothing spoils a potential relationship more than a tardy date.

Where shall we meet?

  • どこで会いましょうか?
  • doko de aimashō ka?

You can ask this, but also suggest a place.

You look great.

  • 元気そうですね。
  • genki sō desu ne.

A wonderful ice breaker! This phrase will help them relax a bit - they probably took great care to look their best just for you.

You are so cute.

  • あなたはとてもかわいいです。
  • anata wa totemo kawaī desu.

If the two of you are getting on really well, this is a fun, flirtatious phrase to use.

What do you think of this place?

  • この場所をどう思いますか?
  • konobasho o dō omoimasu ka?

This another good conversation starter. Show off your Japanese language skills!

Can I see you again?

  • また会えますか?
  • mata aemasu ka?

So the date went really well - don’t waste time! Make sure you will see each other again.

Shall we go somewhere else?

  • どこか他のところに行きましょうか?
  • doko ka hoka no tokoro ni ikimashō ka?

If the place you meet at is not great, you can suggest going elsewhere. It is also a good question to follow the previous one. Variety is the spice of life!

I know a good place.

  • いい場所を知っています。
  • ī basho o shitte imasu.

Use this with the previous question. However, don’t say if you don’t know a good place!

I will drive you home.

  • あなたを家まで送ります。
  • anata o ie made okurimasu.

If your date doesn’t have transport, this is a polite, considerate offer. However, don’t be offended if she/he turns you down on the first date. Especially a woman might not feel comfortable letting you drive her home when the two of you are still basically strangers.

That was a great evening.

  • 素晴らしい夜でした。
  • subarashī yoru deshita.

This is a good phrase to end the evening with.

When can I see you again?

  • いつまたあなたに会えますか?
  • itsu mata anata ni aemasu ka?

If he/she replied ‘Yes’ to ‘Can I see you again?’, this is the next important question.

I’ll call you.

  • 電話します。
  • denwa shimasu.

Say this only if you really mean to do it. In many cultures, this could imply that you’re keeping the proverbial backdoor open.

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2. The Most Romantic Ideas for a Date

You learned all the Japanese phrases to make a date - congratulations! Now you have to decide where to meet, which can be tricky. Discuss these options with your lover to gauge whether you like the same things. Check out romantic date ideas in Japanese below!

Date Ideas in Japanese

museum

  • 美術館
  • bijutsukan

If you’re looking for unique date ideas that are fun but won’t break the bank, museums are the perfect spot! You won’t be running out of things to say in the conversations.

candlelit dinner

  • キャンドルディナー
  • kyandorudeinā

A candlelit dinner is perhaps best to reserve for when the relationship is getting serious. It’s very intimate, and says: “Romance!” It’s a fantastic choice if you’re sure you and your date are in love with each other!

go to the zoo

  • 動物園に行く
  • dōbutsuen ni iku

This is a good choice for shy lovers who want to get the conversation going. Just make sure your date likes zoos, as some people dislike them. Maybe not for the first date, but this is also a great choice if your lover has children - you’ll win his/her adoration for inviting them along!

go for a long walk

  • 長い散歩に出る
  • nagai sanpo ni deru

Need to talk about serious stuff, or just want to relax with your date? Walking together is soothing, and a habit you can keep up together always! Just make sure it’s a beautiful walk that’s not too strenuous.

go to the opera

  • オペラに行く
  • opera ni iku

This type of date should only be attempted if both of you love the opera. It can be a special treat, followed by a candlelit dinner!

go to the aquarium

  • 水族館に行く
  • suizokukan ni iku

Going to the aquarium is another good idea if you need topics for conversation, or if you need to impress your lover’s kids! Make sure your date doesn’t have a problem with aquariums.

walk on the beach

  • 浜辺を歩く
  • hamabe o aruku

This can be a very romantic stroll, especially at night! The sea is often associated with romance and beauty.

have a picnic

  • ピクニックをする
  • pikunikku o suru

If you and your date need to get more comfortable together, this can be a fantastic date. Spending time in nature is soothing and calms the nerves.

cook a meal together

  • 一緒に食事を作る
  • issho ni shokuji o tsukuru

If you want to get an idea of your date’s true character in one go, this is an excellent date! You will quickly see if the two of you can work together in a confined space. If it works, it will be fantastic for the relationship and create a sense of intimacy. If not, you will probably part ways!

have dinner and see a movie

  • 夕食を食べて映画を見る
  • yūshoku o tabete ēga o miru

This is traditional date choice works perfectly well. Just make sure you and your date like the same kind of movies!

3. Must-know Valentine’s Day Vocabulary

Valentine's Day Words in Japanese

Expressing your feelings honestly is very important in any relationship all year round. Yet, on Valentine’s Day you really want to shine. Impress your lover this Valentine’s with your excellent vocabulary, and make his/her day! We teach you, in fun, effective ways, the meanings of the words and how to pronounce them. You can also copy the characters and learn how to write ‘I love you’ in Japanese - think how impressed your date will be!

4. Japanese Love Phrases for Valentine’s Day

So, you now have the basic Valentine’s Day vocabulary under your belt. Well done! But, do you know how to say ‘I love you’ in Japanese yet? Or perhaps you are still only friends. So, do you know how to say ‘I like you’ or ‘I have a crush on you’ in Japanese? No? Don’t worry, here are all the love phrases you need to bowl over your Japanese love on this special day!

Valentine's Day Words in Japanese

I love you.

  • あなたの事を愛しています。
  • Anata no koto o aishite imasu.

Saying ‘I love you’ in Japanese carries the same weight as in all languages. Use this only if you’re sure and sincere about your feelings for your partner/friend.

You mean so much to me.

  • あなたは私にとって、とても大事な存在です。
  • Anata wa watashi ni totte, totemo daiji na sonzai desu.

This is a beautiful expression of gratitude that will enhance any relationship! It makes the receiver feel appreciated and their efforts recognized.

Will you be my Valentine?

  • バレンタインを一緒に過ごしてくれる?
  • Barentain o issho ni sugoshite kureru?

With these words, you are taking your relationship to the next level! Or, if you have been a couple for a while, it shows that you still feel the romance. So, go for it!

You’re so beautiful.

  • 君はとても美しいよ。
  • Kimi wa totemo utsukushii yo.

If you don’t know how to say ‘You’re pretty’ in Japanese, this is a good substitute, gentlemen!

I think of you as more than a friend.

  • 私は、友達以上としてあなたのことを考えている。
  • Watashi wa, tomodachi ijō to shite anata no koto o kangaete iru.

Say this if you are not yet sure that your romantic feelings are reciprocated. It is also a safe go-to if you’re unsure about the Japanese dating culture.

A hundred hearts would be too few to carry all my love for you.

  • 百個のハートでも、君を愛しているというのは表現しつくせない。
  • Hya-kko no hāto demo, kimi o aishite iru to iu no wa hyōgen shi tsukusenai.

You romantic you…! When your heart overflows with love, this would be the best phrase to use.

Love is just love. It can never be explained.

  • 「愛」はただ単に「愛」である。説明なんてできない。
  • “Ai” wa tada tan ni “ai” de aru. Setsumei nante dekinai.

If you fell in love unexpectedly or inexplicably, this one’s for you.

You’re so handsome.

  • あなた、とてもハンサムですね。
  • Anata, totemo hansamu desu ne.

Ladies, this phrase lets your Japanese love know how much you appreciate his looks! Don’t be shy to use it; men like compliments too.

I’ve got a crush on you.

  • 私はあなたに一目惚れした。
  • Watashi wa anata ni hitomebore shita.

If you like someone, but you’re unsure about starting a relationship, it would be prudent to say this. It simply means that you like someone very, very much and think they’re amazing.

You make me want to be a better man.

  • あなたは私により良い男になろうと思わせてくれた。
  • Anata wa watashi ni yori yoi otoko ni narō to omowasete kureta.

Gentlemen, don’t claim this phrase as your own! It hails from the movie ‘As Good as it Gets’, but it is sure to make your Japanese girlfriend feel very special. Let her know that she inspires you!

Let all that you do be done in love.

  • どんな事も愛情をもってやりなさい。
  • Donna koto mo aijō o motte yarinasai

We hope.

You are my sunshine, my love.

  • あなたは私の太陽、そして愛です。
  • Anata wa watashi no taiyō, soshite ai desu.

A compliment that lets your lover know they bring a special quality to your life. Really nice!

Words can’t describe my love for you.

  • 言葉であなたへの愛情は言い表せられない。
  • Kotoba de anata e no aijō wa iiarawasenai.

Better say this when you’re feeling serious about the relationship! It means that your feelings are very intense.

We were meant to be together.

  • 私たちは一緒になる運命だったんだ。
  • Watashi-tachi wa issho ni naru unmei datta n da.

This is a loving affirmation that shows you see a future together, and that you feel a special bond with your partner.

If you were thinking about someone while reading this, you’re definitely in love.

  • これを読んでいる時に誰かの事を考えているなら、あなたは恋に落ちているに違いない。
  • Kore o yonde iru toki ni dareka no koto o kangaete iru nara, anta wa koi ni ochite iru ni chigainai.

Here’s something fun to tease your lover with. And hope he/she was thinking of you!

5. Japanese Quotes about Love

Japanese Love Quotes

You’re a love champ! You and your Japanese lover are getting along fantastically, your dates are awesome, your Valentine’s Day together was spectacular, and you’re very much in love. Good for you! Here are some beautiful phrases of endearment in Japanese that will remind him/her who is in your thoughts all the time.

6. Marriage Proposal Lines

Japanese Marriage Proposal Lines

Wow. Your Japanese lover is indeed the love of your life - congratulations! And may only happiness follow the two of you! In most traditions, the man asks the woman to marry; this is also the Japanese custom. Here are a few sincere and romantic lines that will help you to ask your lady-love for her hand in marriage.

7. 15 Most Common Break-Up Lines

Japanese Break-Up Lines

Instead of moving towards marriage or a long-term relationship, you find that the spark is not there for you. That is a pity! But even though breaking up is never easy, continuing a bad or unfulfilling relationship would be even harder. Remember to be kind to the person you are going to say goodbye to; respect and sensitivity cost nothing. Here are some phrases to help you break up gently.

  • We need to talk.
    • 私達、話し合った方が良いね。
    • Watashi-tachi, hanashiatta hō ga ii ne.

    This is not really a break-up line, but it is a good conversation opener with a serious tone.

    It’s not you. It’s me.

    • あなたのせいじゃない。私のせい。
    • Anata no sei ja nai. Watashi no sei.

    As long as you mean it, this can be a kind thing to say. It means that there’s nothing wrong with your Japanese lover as a person, but that you need something different from a relationship.

    I’m just not ready for this kind of relationship.

    • まだ付き合うとか考えられないんだ。
    • Mada tsukiau toka kangaerarenai n da.

    Things moved a bit fast and got too intense, too soon? Painful as it is, honesty is often the best way to break up with somebody.

    Let’s just be friends.

    • 友達のままでいましょう。
    • Tomodachi no mama de imashō.

    If the relationship was very intense, and you have sent many ‘i love u’ texts in Japanese, this would not be a good breakup line. Feelings need to calm down before you can be friends, if ever. If the relationship has not really developed yet, a friendship would be possible.

    I think we need a break.

    • 距離を置いたほうがいいと思う。
    • Kyori o oita hō ga ii to omou.

    This is again honest, and to the point. No need to play with someone’s emotions by not letting them know how you feel. However, this could imply that you may fall in love with him/her again after a period of time, so use with discretion.

    You deserve better.

    • 君にはもっといい人がいるよ。
    • Kimi ni wa motto ii hito ga iru yo.

    Yes, he/she probably deserves a better relationship if your own feelings have cooled down.

    We should start seeing other people.

    • お互い、他の人を探すべきだよ。
    • O-tagai, hoka no hito o sagasu beki da yo.

    This is probably the least gentle break-up phrase, so reserve it for a lover that doesn’t get the message!

    I need my space.

    • 一人になりたいんだ。
    • Hitori ni naritai n da.

    When a person is too clingy or demanding, this would be an suitable break-up phrase. It is another good go-to for that lover who doesn’t get the message!

    I think we’re moving too fast.

    • 急ぎすぎたんだと思う。
    • Isogisugita n da to omou.

    Say this if you want to keep the relationship, but need to slow down its progress a bit. It is also good if you feel things are getting too intense for your liking. However, it is not really a break-up line, so be careful not to mislead.

    I need to focus on my career.

    • 仕事に集中したいんだ。
    • Shigoto ni shūchū shitai n da.

    If you feel that you will not be able to give 100% in a relationship due to career demands, this is the phrase to use. It’s also good if you are unwilling to give up your career for a relationship.

    I’m not good enough for you.

    • 自分はあなたにはふさわしくないと思う。
    • Jibun wa anata ni wa fusawashikunai to omou.

    Say this only if you really believe it, or you’ll end up sounding false. Break-ups are usually hard for the receiving party, so don’t insult him/her with an insincere comment.

    I just don’t love you anymore.

    • もう気持ちが冷めてしまったんだ。
    • Mō kimochi ga samete shimatta n da.

    This harsh line is sometimes the best one to use if you are struggling to get through to a stubborn, clingy lover who won’t accept your break up. Use it as a last resort. Then switch your phone off and block their emails!

    We’re just not right for each other.

    • 相性が良くなかったんだよ。
    • Aishō ga yokunakatta n da yo.

    If this is how you truly feel, you need to say it. Be kind, gentle and polite.

    It’s for the best.

    • これでよかったんだよ。
    • Kore de yokatta n da yo.

    This phrase is called for if circumstances are difficult and the relationship is not progressing well. Love should enhance one’s life, not burden it!

    We’ve grown apart.

    • こんなに離れてしまっていたんだ。
    • Kon’na ni hanarete shimatte ita n da.

    Cross-cultural relationships are often long-distance ones, and it is easy to grow apart over time.

  • 8. Will Falling in Love help you Learn Japanese faster?

    Most people will agree that the above statement is a no-brainer - of course it will! Your body will be flooded with feel-good hormones, which are superb motivators for anything. JapanesePod101 is one of the best portals to help help make this a reality, so don’t hesitate to enroll now! Let’s quickly look at the reasons why falling in love will speed up your learning of the Japanese language.

    Three Reasons Why Having a Lover will Help you Learn Japanese Faster!

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    1- Being in a love relationship with your Japanese speaking partner will immerse you in the culture
    JapanesePod101 uses immersive methods and tools to teach you Japanese, but having a relationship with a native speaker will be a very valuable addition to your learning experience! You will gain exposure to their world, realtime and vividly, which will make the language come alive even more for you. The experience is likely to expand your world-view, which should motivate you to learn Japanese even faster.

    2- Having your Japanese romantic partner will mean more opportunity to practice speaking
    Nothing beats continuous practice when learning a new language. Your partner will probably be very willing to assist you in this, as your enhanced Japanese language skills will enhance the relationship. Communication is, after all, one of the most important pillars of a good partnership. Also, you will get to impress your lover with the knowledge gained through your studies - a win/win situation!

    3- A supportive Japanese lover is likely to make a gentle, patient teacher and study aid!
    With his/her heart filled with love and goodwill for you, your Japanese partner is likely to patiently and gently correct your mistakes when you speak. This goes not only for grammar, but also for accent and meaning. With his/her help, you could sound like a native in no time!

    Three Reasons Why JapanesePod101 helps you learn Japanese Even Faster when you’re In Love

    Start with a bonus, and download the ‘How To be a Good Lover Cheat Sheet’ for FREE! (Logged-In Member Only)

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    1- All the Resources and Materials Will Help Both of You
    Falling in love with a man or woman speaking Japanese is an opportunity for both of you to learn a new language! For this reason, every lesson, transcript, vocabulary list, and resource at JapanesePod101 is translated into both English and Japanese. So, while your partner can help you learn Japanese faster, you can potentially also help him/her learn and master English!

    2- Lessons Are Designed to Help You Understand and Engage with Japanese Culture
    At JapanesePod101, our focus is to help our students learn practical vocabulary and phrases used by everyday people in Japan. This means that, from your very first lesson, you can apply what you learn immediately! So, when your Japanese partner wants to go out to a restaurant, play Pokemon Go, or attend just about any social function, you have the vocabulary and phrases necessary to have a great time!

    3- Access to Special Resources Dedicated to Romantic Japanese Phrases
    You now have access to JapanesePod101’s specially-developed sections and tools to teach you love words, phrases, and cultural insights to help you find and attract your Japanese soul mate. A personal tutor will assist you to master these brilliantly - remember to invite him/her to your wedding!

    Setsubun: Celebrate the Japanese Bean-throwing Festival!

    Japan is a country with quite a rich culture and history, and the Setsubun Festival reflects this. Find out why the Japanese hold the Bean-throwing Ceremony each year and much more about this holiday’s events with JapanesePod101.com!

    After you’ve learned about this holiday, you’ll have gained much insight into Japan as a whole. So let’s get started by finding out what exactly the Setsubun Festival is.

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    1. What is Setsubun Day?

    Setsubun Day, also known as the Japanese Bean-throwing Festival, is a unique Japanese holiday. Essentially, the Bean-throwing Festival is celebrated as a way of chasing demons away and summoning good fortune.

    In ancient times, many believed that evil spirits were born during the changing of the seasons, and these spirits would make people ill or destroy their crops. To protect themselves, they created a special event to exorcise a symbolic evil spirit, or demon.

    This special event is still performed each year, through throwing beans and reciting chants to keep demons away. Read on for more information about these celebrations.

    2. When is it?

    Season

    節分 (Setsubun) literally means “the day that marks the change from one season to the next.” In the spring, this day is called 立春 (risshun); in the summer, it’s 立夏 (rikka); in the fall, it’s 立秋 (risshū); and in the winter, it’s 立冬 (rittō). Since the Edo period in the 16th and 17th century, the day before 立春 (risshun), meaning “spring,” has been the only one with the name 節分(Setsubun). It’s held each year around February 4.

    3. How is it Celebrated?

    Throw Roasted Soybeans

    There are some fascinating Setsubun traditions that take place on this day. Take, for example, the following.

    At places such as homes and temples, people say, “鬼は外、福は内! (Oni wa soto, fuku wa uchi!)” meaning “Demons outside, fortune inside!” Then, they throw roasted soybeans, known as 福豆 (fukumame) or “fortune beans.” Each family member sows beans at home, though in recent years they have become available at stores like supermarkets.

    At temples, men and women known as 年男 (toshi otoko) and 年女 (toshi onna), meaning they were born in the same Chinese zodiac sign as the current year, throw the beans. These people are said to be vulnerable to disaster that year. After throwing the beans, one bean is eaten for each year of age, and prayers are made for good health over the course of the year.

    Demons are a big part of throwing the beans. However, since demons are fictional and don’t actually exist, fathers will often wear a demon Setsubun mask (or Setsubun oni) and dress as a demon. At kindergartens and nurseries, teachers will play the role of the demon. While children are a little scared, they cheerfully throw beans while chanting “demons outside, fortune inside.” The demon then rushes away and escapes through a door.

    At 節分 (Setsubun), 恵方巻 (ehōmaki) is eaten for good luck. This is a large sushi roll stuffed with Japanese omelette (also known as Tamagoyaki), cucumber, and gourd. Sushi rolls are usually cut into bite-size pieces, but ehōmaki is eaten just as it is, approximately twenty centimeters (almost eight inches) in length.

    There’s also an interesting custom of eating this meal while facing the “lucky direction” for that given year. Further, it’s considered good luck to finish eating the roll in total silence, and many people choose to think about their wishes for the new year as they eat it. One possible wish could be for 無病息災 (Mubyō sokusai) or a “state of perfect health.”

    4. Additional Information

    Did you know that while in most regions people chant “demons outside, fortune inside,” in some places people chant “fortune inside, demons inside?” At temples dedicated to demons, it’s thought that demons are for the use of a god, and so chanting “demons outside” is taboo. This offers a glimpse into an interesting facet of the Japanese culture and how thinking differs on this topic.

    Another interesting fact about this holiday is that sardines are attached to a holly branch, which is then hung on the door. Thorns also grow on holly trees, and it is believed that they too have the power of a talisman to ward away demons.

    5. Must-know Vocab

    Here’s some helpful vocabulary for you to study so you can celebrate Bean-throwing Day to its fullest!

    • 豆 (まめ) — green bean
    • 節分 (せつぶん) — Bean-throwing Ceremony
    • 神社 (じんじゃ) — shrine
    • 鬼 (おに) — devil
    • 立春 (りっしゅん) — the first day of spring
    • 無病息災 (むびょうそくさい) — state of perfect health
    • 恵方巻き(えほうまき) — fortune sushi roll
    • 福は内、鬼は外 (ふくはうち、おにはそと。) — Devils out! Good luck in!
    • 鬼の面 (おにのめん) — devil’s mask
    • 豆まき(まめまき) — bean-throwing
    • 節分祭 (せつぶんさい) — bean-throwing festival

    To hear the pronunciation of each vocab word, check out our Japanese Bean-throwing Day vocabulary list. Here you’ll find each vocab word with an audio file for you to listen to.

    Conclusion

    As you can see, the Setsubun Festival is rooted deeply in Japan’s history, especially in terms of early religion and spiritual beliefs. While some of these beliefs have dwindled over time, this is still a widely celebrated holiday and is enjoyed by many Japanese people each year.

    What do you think about the Setsubun Bean-throwing Ceremony in Japan? Is there a similar holiday in your home country? Let us know in the comments!

    Interested in learning more about Japanese culture? Visit us at JapanesePod101.com, and take advantage of our free vocabulary lists as well as our informational blog posts. You can even utilize our online community to discuss lessons with fellow students, and download our MyTeacher app for a one-on-one Japanese learning experience.

    We hope you enjoyed learning about this Japanese holiday and that you’ll continue delving into Japan’s fascinating culture as you learn the language. JapanesePod101.com will be here for you every step of the way!

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    Supplement Your Japanese with LiveFluent

    LiveFleunt.com

    Are you ready to take the vocabulary, cultural knowledge, and the confidence you’ve gained through JapanesePod101.com and deepen it? Our trusted partner LiveFluent seeks to shed light on the lesser talked-about aspects of learning—and grasping in its full essence—a new language.

    Live Chat

    1. Immersion

    LiveFluent holds the view that a vocab list and good memory are not enough to become fluent in a language. You need to live that language and that culture; you need to actively apply the language you’re learning to the real world and not look back.

    The necessity of immersion in mastering a language is quite interesting. This tactic implies that you go and live in the country of the language you’re studying if possible. As LiveFluent points out, this does, in fact, make full command of the language a necessity.

    From reading street signs to making purchases to being capable of forming relationships with people in this country, you’ll find that getting the hang of Japanese becomes a little more appealing when actually in Japan.

    But once you’re “immersed,” how do you make sure you’re actually able to grasp the language when you need it?

    Dictionary

    2. Context Clues

    LiveFluent suggests that you use context clues to begin understanding the language when it’s in use. What are the street signs shaped like, and where are they placed? What’s written on the shopkeeper’s face, and what tone are they using? Can you make out any single words that the friendly face across from you is saying, and read their body language?

    As a child, your parents or teacher may have urged you to do this for words you didn’t know while reading in lieu of using a dictionary. LiveFluent suggests that you do the same when immersing yourself in a new language. Because it really works!

    3. Conclusion

    By the compass of its wise language-learning ideas, LiveFluent also points to some of the best tools for learning Japanese. Being so empowered with knowledge and equipped with the right tools should make you feel good about taking the next steps in your journey.

    Learning Japanese comes with its hurdles; but it should also come with its fun. If you’re looking to build upon your current knowledge and language skillset, be sure to check out LiveFluent and continue your studies with us here at JapanesePod101!

    We wish you the best of luck and great success in your language-learning endeavors!

    Blood Type Personality in Japan: What It Says about You

    If you have ever visited Japan or stayed in Japan for quite some time, you have probably noticed that a lot of Japanese people ask “what is your blood type?”. This question is one of the most common questions that Japanese people ask. In Japan, it is perfectly fine to ask about a person’s blood type, especially if you want to get to know someone very well instantly, in particular, on a blind date. The reason is that Japanese people believe that each blood type has its own distinct personality and it is the quickest way to determine a person’s temperament and even compatibility with others. You may feel confused as to why people ask about blood types in Japan, but don’t worry. If you are asked this by a Japanese, that means that the person wants to get to know you better.

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    So who developed this concept? The blood type personality theory was developed by a Japanese person named Masahiko Nomi who graduated from the University of Tokyo. He began his first career as a journalist and his first book “Understanding Affinity by Blood Type” became a bestseller in the 1970s. The idea then spread outward and it is popular in some Asian countries, such as South Korea and Taiwan. You are probably wondering, ‘so what’s this all about?’, so let’s have a look at the description of each blood type to see if it matches with your personality. Then let’s look at the compatibility of blood types.

    Blood Type A

    1. Blood Type A

    According to the Japanese blood type personality chart, it is said that people with blood type A are known to be diplomatic and friendly, however due to their sensitive natures, they prefer staying alone to being in a group; therefore they may feel uncomfortable in crowded areas or parties. Also, they are fragile-hearted and easily get hurt, therefore it takes time for them to open up to people. Others may take this negatively and view them as snobs, since people with blood type A are good at hiding their feelings and do not express themselves a lot compared to other blood types such as blood type B or O. If you want to be friends with a person with Blood Type A, the best way is to be patient and get to know them slowly. Once you get to know them you will find that they are very friendly and down to earth! Also, they are punctual and always expect the best results in everything they do, therefore others seem them as perfectionists. When people describe blood type A, you will often hear:

    A型は、几帳面で細かいそうです。
    Aがたは、きちょうめんでこまかいそうです。
    A-gata wa, kichōmen de komakai sō desu.
    “People with type A blood are earnest and sensitive.”

    Blood Type A Personality in Japanese

    • 几帳面 (きちょうめん, kichōmen) = “methodical”
    • 慎重 (しんちょう, shinchō) = “cautious”
    • こだわりが強い (こだわりがつよい, kodawari ga tsuyoi) = “stubborn”
    • 細かい (こまかい, komakai) = “detailed”

    Blood Type Compatibility for A

    • The best blood type compatibility is O, followed by A.
    • The worst blood type compatibility is B.

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    Blood Type B

    2. Blood Type B

    According to the Japanese blood type personality chart, it is said that B types are the most outgoing compared to other blood types. Also they are independent and are passionate about the things that they are interested in. Type Bs always seek stimulation and they are not afraid of speaking their minds. Therefore, they can be seen as self-centered because they express their opinion, regardless of what the other person might feel.

    In Japan, men with blood type B have a negative reputation for being playboys and for not suitable for a stable relationship. But don’t worry, although blood type B has a negative reputation for being the blood type of playboys, there are many positive traits too. They are curious, honest and enjoy attention, therefore people with blood type B can make friends easily, like a social butterfly! When people describe blood type B, you will often hear:

    B型は、創造的で楽観的なようです。
    Bがたは、そうぞうてきでらっかんてきなようです。
    B-gata wa, sōzōteki de rakkanteki na yō desu.
    “People with blood type B are creative and optimistic.”

    Blood Type B Personality in Japanese

    • 創造的 (そうぞうてき, sōzōteki) “creative”
    • 楽観的 (らっかんてき, rakkanteki) “optimistic”
    • 利己的 (りこてき, rikoteki) “selfish”
    • 無責任 (むせきにん, musekinin) “irresponsible”

    Blood Type Compatibility for B

    • The best blood type compatibility is AB, followed by O.
    • The worst blood type compatibility is A.

    Blood Type O

    3. Blood Type O

    They are known to be energetic, practical and friendly. Also blood type O is labeled as a natural leader. They are experts at expressing their opinions in a constructive way, making sure that everyone listens to them, while still being friendly to everyone. They know how to control their emotions very well, giving others a great impression of being stable and under control. Research indicates that blood type O is the most prefered blood type by CEOs and coworkers because of the traits mentioned above. However, although they might have a reputation of being strong outside, they are very sensitive inside. People with blood type O have some difficulties expressing their feelings due to a fear of rejection and also they tend to burn themselves out trying to get things done perfectly. The best way to describe type Os in Japanese is:

    O型の人は情熱的だと言われています。
    Oがたのひとはじょうねつてきだといわれています。
    Ō-gata no hito wa jōnetsuteki da to iwarete imasu.
    “It’s said that people with type O blood are passionate.”

    Blood Type O Personality in Japanese

    • おおらか(おおらか, ōraka) = “easygoing”
    • 社交的 (しゃこうてき, shakōteki) = “outgoing”
    • 高慢 (こうまん, kōman) = “arrogant”
    • 嫉妬深い (しっとぶかい, shittobukai) = “jealous”

    Blood Type Compatibility for O

    • The best blood type compatibility is A, followed by B.
    • The worst blood type compatibility is AB.

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    Blood Type AB

    4. Blood Type AB

    They are the most interesting type compared to the others because this blood type is labeled as either genius or psycho. They are unpredictable because they often jump around from one activity to the next and their temperament is mixture of blood type A and B, therefore their personalities change quickly depending on their mood and the situation, and sometimes they don’t have control over it. Also type ABs are rational thinkers, therefore they cannot stand it when they find some situations to be irrational. As a result, they may have some difficulties interacting with people, giving others the wrong impression of being moody or two-faced. One of the ways to describe blood type ABs is:

    日本でAB型の人は少ないです。
    にほんでABがたのひとはすくないです。
    Nihon de ĒBī-gata no hito wa sukunai desu.
    “We don’t have many people with the AB blood type in Japan.”

    Blood Type AB Personality in Japanese

    • 合理的 (ごうりてき, gōriteki) = “rational”
    • 才能がある (さいのうがある, sainō ga aru) = “to be talented”
    • 批判的 (ひはんてき, hihanteki) = “critical”
    • 風変わり (ふうがわり, fūgawari) = “eccentric”

    Blood Type Compatibility for AB

    • The best blood type compatibility is AB, followed by B.
    • The worst blood type compatibility is O.

    Now, let’s have a look at few useful Japanese sentences which you can use right away.

    Talking about Blood Type

    5. Talking about Your Blood Type in Japanese

    “What’s your blood type?”

    • Informal: (あなたの)血液型は何型? ((あなたの)けつえきがたはなにがた? Anata no ketsueki-gata wa nani-gata?)
    • Formal: (あなたの)血液型は何型ですか。 ((あなたの)けつえきがたはなにがたですか。 Anata no ketsueki-gata wa nani-gata desu ka.)

    “My blood type is…”:

    • Informal: 私の血液型は、…。 (わたしのけつえきがたは、…。 Watashi no ketsueki-gata wa, … )
    • Formal: 私の血液型は、…です。 (わたしのけつえきがたは、…です。 Watashi no ketsueki-gata wa, … desu.)

    Example:

    A: なおこの血液型は何型?
    A: (なおこのけつえきがたはなにがた? Naoko no ketsueki-gata wa nani-gata?)
    A: “What’s Naoko’s blood type?”

    B: なおこの血液型は、O型。
    B: (なおこのけつえきがたは、Oがた。, Naoko no ketsueki-gata wa, O-gata.)
    B: “Naoko’s blood type is O.”

    Tokyo

    6. How JapanesePod101 Can Help You Learn more Japanese

    You’ve learned some secret Japanese blood type personalities with useful Japanese phrases to describe your blood type personality.

    To sum up, we had a look at each blood type and its personality and temperament, and blood type compatibility for each type. Do you think that they are true? Also, do you know how to describe your personality in Japanese? JapanesePod101 has prepared a list of useful Japanese adjectives to describe your personality for you to study. It is available online, so feel free to download it for free.

    Log in to Download Your Free Cheat Sheet - How to Master A Language!

    So next time you run into a Japanese person and want to understand their personality quickly, why not ask a simple question, like:

    血液型は何型ですか。
    ketsueki-gata wa nani-gata desu ka.
    “What is your blood type?”

    JapanesePod101 has many vocabulary lists available on our website for you to download for free. Why don’t you prepare a self-introduction, including your blood type and your personality in Japanese? Click “10 Lines You Need for Introducing Yourself” to learn practical phrases in Japanese.

    Thank you and we hope that you enjoy learning Japanese!

    Teru Teru Bozu: How to Stop the Rain in Japan

    If you have a plan to travel, or go on a date, you don’t want it to be rainy. But what if the weather forecast said that it will rain? You will be very disappointed. But you still have hope!

    The Japanese sunshine lucky charm, Teru Teru Bozu(てるてる坊主; Teruterubōzu), will help you to pray for nice weather. It’s a cute doll made out of white tissue paper, which looks like a Halloween ghost. In Japan, people believe that if they hang Teru Teru Bozu(てるてる坊主; Teruterubōzu), it will be sunny the next day. Japanese children make them for their special school events like field trips to have good weather.

    Here you can discover Teru Teru Bozu(てるてる坊主; Teruterubōzu), how to make the doll, and the right way to pray to get sunshine. I will also explain the meaning of the word and its history.

    Rainy Day

    1.What is Teru Teru Bozu?

    If you translate Teru Teru Bozu(てるてる坊主; Teruterubōzu) literally, teru(てる or 照る) means “shine” or “to be sunny” and bozu (坊主) means “Buddhist monk.” So it means “shine shine monk.” It’s a funny name, isn’t it?

    Why is Teru Teru Bozu(てるてる坊主; Teruterubōzu) called a Buddhist monk? Since Teru Teru Bozu(てるてる坊主; Teruterubōzu) doesn’t have hair on his head it looks like a monk’s shaved head. But there’s more important reason.

    Japanese Buddhist monks played roles as rainmakers in olden times. When people suffered from want of rain, emperors(天皇; Ten’nō) or shogun(将軍; Shōgun) ordered Buddhist monks to pray for rain. Buddhist monks also prayed to stop floods. Actually, there are many legends in which high Buddhist priests succeed in controlling rain.

    The Origin

    2. The Origin

    The origin of Teru Teru Bozu(てるてる坊主; Teruterubōzu) isn’t clear. But it’s said that the custom might have come from China. In China, there was a custom to pray for good weather by using a cut paper (切り紙; kirigami) doll. The doll is a girl who has a broom called So-Chin-Nyan (掃晴娘) in Chinese. If you wish for good weather, she will sweep the clouds out. This is considered the origin of Teru Teru Bozu(てるてる坊主; Teruterubōzu). In the Edo(江戸; Edo) period of Japan, people made Teru Teru Bozu(てるてる坊主; Teruterubōzu) from origami(折り紙i) paper. The shape was more like a human. So it was more like So-Chin-Nyan in China. You can’t find the custom in modern China, but Japanese people still use it in their daily lives.

    How to Make Teru Teru Bozu

    3. How to Make Teru Teru Bozu

    To make Teru Teru Bozu(てるてる坊主; Teruterubōzu), you need tissue paper and a rubber band. You can also use white cloth or a paper towel instead of tissue paper.

    Here is a very simple way to make Teru Teru Bozu(てるてる坊主; Teruterubōzu)

    1. Crumple some pieces of tissue paper and make a small ball. The size of the ball should be bigger than a ping-pong ball.
    2. Put the ball on the center of another piece of tissue paper and wrap it.
    3. Tie it with a rubber band just under the ball. If you want to make cute Teru Teru Bozu(てるてる坊主; Teruterubōzu), you can use ribbon or wool to tie it instead of arubber band.

    That is it! Isn’t it so easy?

    Today, most people draw a smiley face before they hang it. But if you want to do it the right way, don’t draw his face. Draw the face after you get a good result. It’s because if the ink runs, the face would look sad and that causes rain.

    Pray for Good Weather

    4. How to Pray for Good Weather in Japan

    To get a good result, it’s important to know the traditional right way. Hang Teru Teru Bozu (てるてる坊主; Teruterubōzu) in front of the window. It should be outside. The best timing to hang one is a day before the day you don’t want rain. Be careful not hang it upside down because it means you want it to rain. After you hang it, you can sing the Teru Teru Bozu(てるてる坊主; Teruterubōzu) song to pray for good weather. The song is very popular among Japanese children.

    The song of Teru Teru Bozu(てるてる坊主; Teruterubōzu)

    Japanese:
    てるてるぼうず、てるぼうず(Teru-teru-bōzu, teru bozu)
    明日天気にしておくれ (Ashita tenki ni shite o-kure)
    いつかの夢の空のように(tsuka no yume no sora no yō ni)
    晴れたら金の鈴あげよ (Haretara kin no suzu ageyo)

    Translation:
    Teru teru bozu, teru bozu
    Tomorrow, make a sunny day
    Like the sky in a dream sometime
    If it’s sunny I’ll give you a golden bell

    If Teru Teru Bozu(てるてる坊主; Teruterubōzu) make your wish come true, draw a smiley face and give him sake(酒; sake) or another type of alcohol. It’s the traditional way to say “thank you” to him. In olden times, people used to float Teru Teru Bozu(てるてる坊主; Teruterubōzu) down a river. They thought that he had a soul. But now we can’t do it because of environmental reasons. So you can just throw it in the garbage.

    Of course, it sometimes works but sometime doesn’t. However, Teru Teru Bozu(てるてる坊主; Teruterubōzu) is cute and it’s fun to make with friends. Why don’t you make one for your special events?

    10 Famous Japanese Movie Quotes

    Watching Japanese movies with English subtitles can be one of the best ways to improve and keep your Japanese listening and speaking skills tip-top.

    Here are some of the best Japanese movies and TV series, dating mostly from the previous century, to keep you on the edge of your seat. We also give you some of their quotes to memorize, if you choose. If you can’t catch it yourself, why not ask your JapanesePod101 facilitator to translate the quote for you in Japanese! Imagine how impressed your friends will be when you speak like a Japanese native! Here are some tips to improve your pronunciation while watching movies in Japanese.

    Table of Contents

    1. Battle Royale
    2. Merry Christmas, Mr. Lawrence
    3. Sailor Suit and Machine Gun
    4. It’s Tough Being a Man
    5. Lupin the Third, Mystery of Mamo
    6. Trick
    7. Violent Cop
    8. Onimasa
    9. Porco Rosso
    10. Ringu
    11. Bonus! Bayside Shakedown 2
    12. How Can Watching Japanese Movies Help you Improve your Japanese?

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    1. Battle Royale

    • Japanese Title: バトル・ロワイアル
    • Romanization: Batoru rowaiaru
    • English Title: Battle Royale

    This futuristic, dystopian Japanese movie was shot in 2000 and was based on an adaptation of a novel with the same name. The book was written by Koushun Takami. The movie’s dense plot revolves around a group of ninth-grade Japanese students who are forced, by government legislation, to kill one another on a deserted island in what is referred to as the ‘Battle Royale’. They are to fight to death, leaving only one victor, or commit suicide. The drama and themes such as betrayal, lost love and friendship keep the movie relatable, but it was still released with a rarely-used R-15 rating in Japan.

    • Japanese Quote: そこで今日は皆さんに、ちょっと殺し合いをしてもらいます。
    • Romanization: Sokode kyō wa mina-san ni, chotto koroshiai o shite moraimasu.
    • Meaning: So, I would like everyone to kill each other today.

    The teenagers’ grueling battle is launched with the class teacher’s chilling words.


    2. Merry Christmas, Mr. Lawrence

    • Japanese Title: 戦場のメリークリスマス
    • Romanization: Senjō no merīkurisumasu
    • English Title: Merry Christmas, Mr. Lawrence

    Released in 1983, this famous human drama, directed by Nagisa Ôshima, is set in a Japanese prison camp during World War II. It centers on the battle of wills between the Japanese camp commander, and the captured British soldiers. One of the captives, John Lawrence, acts as interpreter and attempts to mend the cultural divide between the British and the Japanese. The movie is based on a book by Laurence van der Post, called The Seed and the Sower.

    • Japanese Quote: メリークリスマス Mr.ローレンス。
    • Romanization: Merīkurisumasu misutā Rōrensu.
    • Meaning: Merry Christmas, Mr. Lawrence.

    Its title is also its most famous quote, uttered in the bittersweet end by Japanese prisoner Gengo Hara, played by Kitano Takeshi.


    3. Sailor Suit and Machine Gun

    • Japanese Title: セーラー服と機関銃
    • Romanization: Sērā-fuku to kikan jū
    • English Title: Sailor Suit and Machine Gun

    Called one of the defining satirical or comedy-action films of Japanese cinema in the early 80s, Sailor Suit and Machine Gun tells the story of an average school girl who gets charged to take over her uncle’s yakuza clan. The yakuza are the Japanese equivalent of the mafia. The script was based on a novel by Jiro Akagawa, called Sêrâ-fuku to kikanjû, which was also the film’s original title.

    • Japanese Quote: 快感。
    • Romanization: Kaikan.
    • Meaning: Feels so good.

    The character is a strong girl called Izumi Hoshi, and she was played by Japanese idol Hiroko Yakushimaru. It is a satirical take on the usually testosterone-fuelled yakuza movies, and its femme fatale wears the traditional Japanese sailor-style school uniform. One of the film’s famous, rather bleak quotes was uttered by Izumi as she shoots her machine gun in front of a crowd: “Feels so good.”


    4. It’s Tough Being a Man

    • Japanese Title: 男はつらいよ
    • Romanization: Otoko wa tsurai yo
    • English Title: It’s Tough Being a Man

    The first of a series, Otoko wa Tsurai yo centres around the antics of the relatable, endearingly-imperfect main character Tora-san, masterfully depicted by actor Kiyoshi Atsumi. It was released in 1969, and directed by Yoji Yamada. The film’s plot is simple enough - Tora-san is a traveling salesman estranged from his family. He returns to the lives of his aunt, uncle and sister after 20 years, and effortlessly wreaks havoc for them. The movie was so popular that a 48-episode movie series and 26-episode TV series were conceived with the same characters.

    Some critics say that this film and the subsequent series will inform any viewer of the unique underpinnings of Japanese culture better than any sociology class could.

    • Japanese Quote: それを言っちゃ、おしまいよ。
    • Romanization: Sore o itcha, oshimai yo.
    • Meaning: You shouldn’t say that.

    It’s most famous quote is peppered throughout the series, and roughly translates as: “You shouldn’t say that!” The phrase means, in essence, that ‘if you say that, it’s the end of everything!’ Pure over-the-top comedy.


    5. Lupin the Third, The Mystery of Mamo

    • Japanese Title: ルパン三世 ルパンVS複製人間
    • Romanization: Rupan sansei rupan VS fukusei ningen
    • English Title: Lupin the Third, The Mystery of Mamo

    Lupin the Third was a manga series that became popular in the late ‘60s, written and illustrated by Monkey Punch. The series relates the adventures of an agile thief, Arséne Lupin, who is the grandson of the well-known French gentleman thief with the same name, from the popular Maurice Leblanc novels. Lupin III comics first appeared in the Weekly Manga Action magazine, and The Mystery of Mamo is the first film in a series of Japanese anime, science fiction, adventure-comedies based on the Lupin III franchise. It remains one of the most popular Japanese anime series worldwide.

    • Japanese Quote: やつはとんでもないものを盗んでいきました。あなたの心です。
    • Romanization: Yatsu wa tondemo nai mono o nusunde ikimashita. Anata no kokoro desu.
    • Meaning: That guy stole an irreplaceable thing. Your heart.

    The Mystery of Mamo follows the young thief’s antics as he tries to foil Mamo, who is a powerful, rich hermit seeking eternal life. Of course, Lupin also tries throughout the movie to win the heart of his rival and objet d’amour, Fujiko Mine.


    6. Trick

    • Japanese Title: トリック
    • Romanization: Torikku
    • English Title: Trick

    Trick started as a single TV-series in 2000, the brainchild of director Yukihiko Tsutsumi, and later segued into two more seasons on TV, four movies and three feature-length specials. The plotlines centres on the main character of Naoko Yamada, a young woman who got fired from one job after the other. In her own mind, she’s a talented magician though, so eventually she lands with Professor Ueda, and together the two debunk tales of supernatural phenomena, expose fake spiritualists, and solve mysterious murders and other crimes.

    • Japanese Quote: お前らのやった事は全部お見通しだ!
    • Romanization: Omae-ra no yatta koto wa zenbu o-mitōshi da!
    • Meaning: I know what you’ve done!

    The quote most used in the series and the movies is: “I know what you’ve done!” This is uttered by the triumphant protagonists upon solving a mystery.


    7. Violent Cop

    • Japanese Title: その男、凶暴につき
    • Romanization: Sono otoko, kyōbō ni tsuki
    • English Title: Violent Cop

    A 1989 film, Violent Cop follows the blood-spattered story of detective Azuma, a Japanese police officer who follows his own head and rules to get results. This loose cannon gets entangled in a drama involving gang-violence, drugs, his close friend and police partner, Iwaki, and his feeble-minded sister, who gets kidnapped.

    • Japanese Quote: どいつもこいつもキチガイだ。
    • Romanization: Doitsu mo koitsu mo kichigai da.
    • Meaning: Everybody is crazy.

    The film was originally written to be a comedy, but no trace of funny is left in the final product of this very dark, nihilistic crime thriller. One cryptic quote from drug-dealing character, Shinkai about sums up the feeling: “Everybody is crazy”.


    8. Onimasa

    • Japanese Title: 鬼龍院花子の生涯
    • Romanization: Kiryūin hanako no shōgai
    • English Title: Onimasa

    Another brutal movie, Onimasa is an epic gangster family melodrama released in 1982, and is sometimes referred to as Onimasa: A Japanese Godfather. The story deals with the life and drama of a crime syndicate boss and his family on Shikoku Island - patriarch Masagaro (aka Onimasa), his wife and their two daughters; one is adopted and called Matsue, and the other daughter is blood related. The film was directed by Hideo Gosha, and won a number of awards, but critics slated it for drawing heavily on the mega-successful The Godfather.

    • Japanese Quote: なめたらあかんぜよ!
    • Romanization: Nametara akan ze yo!
    • Meaning: Don’t make a fool of me!

    The quote is from Matsue, who exclaims: “Don’t make a fool of me!” She is a striking female lead in the film, whose headstrong, unconventional character somewhat redeems this lengthy movie with its overladen plot. Portrayed as strong-willed and liberal, Matsue stands out in a chauvinistic, male-dominated society.


    9. Porco Rosso

    • Japanese Title: 紅の豚
    • Romanization: Kurenai no buta
    • English Title: Porco Rosso

    The title, Porco Rosso, literally means “crimson pig”, and this is another hugely popular Japanese animated comedy-adventure film, written and directed by Hayao Miyazaki. It was released in 1992, and relates the tale of a World War II ex-Ace pilot who gets cursed and turned into an anthropomorphic pig. He rescues distressed damsels and other victims of kidnapping pirates. The movie was based on Miyazaki’s Hikōtei Jidai or The Age of the Flying Boat.

    • Japanese Quote: 飛ばねぇ豚はただの豚だ。
    • Romanization: Tobanee buta wa tada no buta da.
    • Meaning: A pig that doesn’t fly is just an ordinary pig.

    Porco Rosso stoically and famously says: “A pig who doesn’t fly is just an ordinary pig.”


    10. Ringu

    • Japanese Title: リング
    • Romanization: Ringu
    • English Title: Ring

    In 1998, a horror movie was quietly released in Japan, and forever changed the face of this genre. Ringu, directed by Hideo Nakata, was soon remade for the English-speaking market as The Ring, and scared the wits out of movie viewers across the globe with its masterful depiction of menacing death approaching slowly. The film follows a female reporter, Reiko Asakawa, and her ex-husband as they chase a story about a killer video - everyone who watches it dies within a week.

    • Japanese Quote: 智ちゃん、呪いのビデオ見たんだよ。
    • Romanization: Tomo-chan, noroi no bideo mita n da yo.
    • Meaning: Tomo watched the cursed video.

    “This kind of thing… it doesn’t start by one person telling a story. It’s more like everyone’s fear just takes on a life of its own,” is how one of the characters explains the video’s horrific effect to Reiko. Don’t watch it alone.


    Bonus! Bayside Shakedown 2

    • Japanese Title: 踊る大捜査線 THE MOVIE 2 レインボーブリッジを封鎖せよ!
    • Romanization: Odoru daisōsasen za mūbī tsū reinbō burijji o fūsa seyo!
    • English Title: Bayside Shakedown 2

    踊る大捜査線 THE MOVIE 2 レインボーブリッジを封鎖せよ! (Bayside Shakedown 2) is a movie that was released in 2003. Originally this film came from a Japanese drama series broadcasted since 1997. Six movies were made in total. The story is about Japanese police in Odaiba, Tokyo. The main character is Shunsaku Aoshima, whom Yuji Oda plays. In the famous scene, he was trying to blockade the Rainbow Bridge, which is located between the isle of Odaiba and Tokyo’s mainland, in order to trap the suspect on Odaiba island. Then, Aoshima figures out that it’s impossible to close the Rainbow Bridge and reports this to the incident room.

    • Japanese Quote: レインボーブリッジ封鎖出来ません。
    • Romanization: Reinbō burijji fūsa dekimasen.
    • Meaning: I cannot blockade the Rainbow Bridge!

    One of the most famous quotes is レインボーブリッジ封鎖出来ません, which means “I cannot blockade the Rainbow Bridge!”


    How Can Watching Japanese Movies Help you Improve your Japanese?

    Watching TV

    As mentioned in the beginning, watching movies can increase your exposure to native Japanese, and train your ear to the language’s finer nuances. You will be surprised just how much you will learn by watching movies!To practice your speaking, why not memorize the quotes from these famous Japanese films and TV series. Remember - the more you practice, the closer you’ll come to perfect! At JapanesePod101, we help you reach this goal in fun, effective and easy ways. Practice core vocabulary with learn-on-the-go apps and tools; download thousands of detailed PDF lesson notes, and engage in a lively community of other Japanese language learners and knowledgeable and energetic hosts. Get access to a nearly inexhaustible Lesson Library that allows you to learn the language at the pace that suits you best. Soon you’ll be ready to make your own famous Japanese movie! Start with a bonus, and download the Must-Know Beginner Vocabulary PDF for FREE! (Logged-In Member Only)

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    How to Celebrate April Fools’ Day in Japanese

    How to Celebrate April Fools' Day in Japanese!

    Most everyone is familiar with this day, as it is celebrated nearly everywhere the world. Yet, when exactly is April Fools’ Day? And where did April Fools come from? April Fools’ Day is observed on April 1st every year. This day of jokes and pranks is believed to have stemmed from the 16th-century calendar change in France, when New Year’s Day was moved from April 1 to January 1. This action was taken due to the adoption of the Gregorian calendar.

    However, a few people were resistant to the calendar change, so they continued to observe New Year’s Day on April 1st, rather than the new date. They were referred to as the “April Fools”, and others started playing mocking tricks on them. This custom endured, and is practiced to this day around the world!

    Table of Contents

    1. Top One Million Words You Need to Know for April Fools’ Day
    2. Japanese Phrases You Can Use on April Fools’ Day
    3. Some of the Coolest April Fools’ Pranks To Play on Anybody
    4. How Can JapanesePod101 Make Your April Fools’ Day Special?
    5. Top 1000 Most Useful Phrases in Japanese - Testing New Technology

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    1. Top One Million Words You Need to Know for April Fools’ Day

    Do you want to know how to say April Fools’ Day in Japanese? Well, there are millions of ways and words, but here are the top one million Japanese words you really need to know! Simply click this link. Here are some of them you will find useful:

    1. joke - 冗談を言う - jōdan o iu
    2. funny - 面白い - omoshiroi
    3. sneaky - こそこそ - kosokoso
    4. humor - ユーモア - yūmoa
    5. fool - ばか - baka
    6. surprise - 驚かす - odorokasu
    7. prankster - いたずら者 - itazuramono
    8. prank - いたずら - itazura
    9. play a joke - からかう - karakau
    10. lie - うそをつく - uso o tsuku
    11. deceptive - だます - damasu
    12. April 1st - 4月1日 - shi-gatsu tsuitachi

    2. Japanese Phrases You Can Use on April Fools’ Day

    Japanese Phrases for April Fools' Day

    Don’t limit yourself to practical jokes - use these April Fools’ phrases in Japanese to prank your favorite Japanese friend or colleague!

    1. I learned Japanese in 1 month.
      • 1ヶ月で、日本語を習得しました。
      • I-kkagetu de, Nihongo o shūtoku shimashita.
    2. All classes for today got canceled.
      • 今日のクラスはすべてキャンセルになりました。
      • Kyō no kurasu wa subete kyanseru ni narimashita.
    3. I’m sorry, but I’ve just broken your favorite pair of glasses.
      • 申し訳ありません。あなたのお気に入りのメガネを壊してしまいました。
      • Mōshiwake arimasen. Anata no o-ki ni iri no megane o kowashite shimaimashita.
    4. Someone has just hit your car.
      • 今さっき、あなたの車にぶつかっていった人がいました。
      • Ima sakki, anata no kuruma ni butsukatte itta hito ga imashita.
    5. I’m getting married.
      • 結婚します。
      • Kekkon shimasu.
    6. You won a free ticket.
      • 無料チケットが当たりましたよ。
      • Muryō chiketto ga atarimashita yo.
    7. I saw your car being towed.
      • あなたの車がレッカーで移動されていくのを見ました。
      • Anata no kuruma ga rekkā de idō sarete iku no o mimashita.
    8. They’re giving away free gift cards in front of the building.
      • 建物の前で無料のギフトカードを配っています。
      • Tatemono no mae de muryō no gifuto kādo o kubatte imasu.
    9. A handsome guy is waiting for you outside.
      • かっこいい男性が外であなたを待っています。
      • Kakkoī dansei ga soto de anata o matte imasu.
    10. A beautiful lady asked me to give this phone number to you.
      • きれいな女性にこの電話番号を渡してほしいって言われました。
      • Kirei na josei ni kono denwa bangō o watashite hoshī tte iwaremashita.
    11. Can you come downstairs? I have something special for you.
      • ちょっと下の階に来てくれますか。渡したい物があるんです。
      • Chotto shita no kai ni kite kuremasu ka. Watashitai mono ga arundesu.
    12. Thank you for your love letter this morning. I never could have guessed your feelings.
      • 今朝のラブレター、ありがとう。私のことを想ってくれていたなんて思いもしませんでした。
      • Kesa no rabu retā, arigatō. Watashi no koto o omotte kurete ita nante omoi mo shimasen deshita.

    Choose your victims carefully, though; the idea is to get them to laugh with you, not to hurt their feelings or humiliate them in front of others. Be extra careful if you choose to play a prank on your boss - you don’t want to antagonize them with an inappropriate joke.

    3. Some of the Coolest April Fools’ Pranks To Play on Anybody

    Choose Bad or Good

    Right, now that you know the top million April Fools’ words in Japanese, let’s look at some super pranks and tricks to play on friends, colleagues and family. Some April Fools ideas never grow old, while new ones are born every year.

    Never joke in such a way that it hurts anyone, or humiliates them badly in front of others - the idea is for everybody to laugh and enjoy the fun! Respect is still key, no matter what day of the year it is.

    Cockroach prank

    1- Infestation

    This trick is so simple, yet so creepy, it’s almost unbelievable. Take black paper, cut out the silhouette of a giant cockroach, a spider or another insect, and stick it inside the lampshade of a table lamp. When the lamp is switched on, it will look like a monstrous insect is sitting inside the lampshade. Or, get a whole lot of realistic-looking plastic insects, and spread them over a colleague’s desk and chair, or, at home, over the kids’ beds etc. Creep-factor: stellar.

    2- Which One Doesn’t Fit?

    Put the photo of a celebrity or a notorious politician in a frame, and take it to work on April Fools’ Day. Hang the photo on the staff picture wall, and wait. You’ll be surprised how long it can take for people to notice that one picture doesn’t fit.

    3- Something Weird in the Restroom

    At work, replace the air freshener in the restroom with something noxious like insect killer, oven cleaner or your own odious mixture in a spray bottle. Be sure to cover the bottle’s body so no one suspects a swap.

    Or paint a bar of soap with clear nail polish, and leave it at the hand wash basin. It will not lather.

    Or, if your workplace’s restroom has partitioned toilets with short doors, arrange jeans or trousers and shoes on all but one of the toilet covers, so it looks like every stall is occupied. Now wait for complaints, and see how long it takes for someone to figure out the April Fools’ Day prank. You’ll probably wish you had a camera inside the restroom. But, unless you don’t mind getting fired, don’t put your own recording device in there!

    Funny Face

    4- Call Me Funny

    Prepare and print out a few posters with the following instructions: Lion Roar Challenge! Call this number - 123-456-7890 - and leave your best lion’s roar as voicemail! Best roarer will be announced April 10 in the cafeteria. Prize: $100. (Lion’s roar is just an example; you can use any animal call, or even a movie character’s unique sound, such as Chewbacca from Star Wars. The weirder, the funnier. Obviously!) Put the posters up in the office where most of the staff is likely to see them. Now wait for the owner of the number to visit you with murderous intent. Have a conciliatory gift ready that’s not a prank.

    5- Minty Cookies

    This is another simple but hugely effective prank - simply separate iced cookies, scrape off the icing, and replace it with toothpaste. Serve during lunch or tea break at work, or put in your family’s lunch boxes. Be sure to take photos of your victim’s faces when they first bite into your April Fools’ cookies.

    6- Wild Shopping

    At your local grocer, place a realistic-looking plastic snake or spider among the fresh vegetables. Now wait around the corner for the first yell.

    7- The Oldest Trick in the Book

    Don’t forget probably the oldest, yet very effective April Fools’ joke in the book - smearing hand cream or Vaseline on a door handle that most staff, family or friends are likely to use. Yuck to the max!

    8- Sneeze On Me

    Another golden oldie is also gross, yet harmless and utterly satisfying as a prank. Fill a small spray bottle that you can easily conceal with water. Walk past a friend, colleague or one of your kids, and fake a sneeze while simultaneously spraying them with a bit of water. Expect to be called a totally disgusting person. Add a drop of lovely smelling essential oil to the water for extra confusion.

    9- Word Play Repairs

    Put a fresh leek in the hand wash basin at home or work, and then tell your housemates or colleagues this: “There’s a huge leak in the restroom/bathroom basin, it’s really serious. Please can someone go have a look?!” Expect exasperation and smiles all around. Note that this prank is only likely to work where people understand English well.

    10- Scary Face

    Print out a very scary face on an A4 sheet of paper, and place it in a colleague’s, or one of your kid’s drawers, so it’s the first thing they see when they open the drawer. You may not be very popular for a while.

    11- Wake Up To Madness

    Put foamy shaving cream, or real whipped cream on your hand, and wake your kid up by tickling their nose with it. As long as they get the joke, this could be a wonderful and fun way to start April Fools’ Day.

    Computer Prank

    12- Computer Prank

    This one’s fabulous, if you have a bit of time to fiddle with a colleague, friend or your kid’s computer. It is most effective on a computer where most of the icons they use are on the desktop background itself (as opposed to on the bottom task bar).

    Take and save a screenshot of their desktop with the icons. Set this screenshot as their background image. Now delete all the working icons. When they return to their computer, wait for the curses when no amount of clicking on the icons works.

    13- Monster Under the Cup

    This one will also work well anywhere people meet. Take a paper cup, and write the following on it in black pen: “Danger! Don’t lift, big spider underneath.” Place it upside-down on prominent flat surface, such as a kitchen counter, a colleague’s desk or a restaurant table. Expect some truly interesting responses.

    Door Prank

    14- Prank Door

    Write in large letters on a large and noticeable piece of paper: PUSH. Tape this notice on a door that should be pulled to open, and watch the hilarious struggle of those clever souls who actually read signs.

    4. How Can JapanesePod101 Make Your April Fools’ Day Special?

    If you happen to visit Japan, or if you work for any Japanese company, knowing the above Japanese prankster phrases can really lighten up your day. Showing you have a sense of humor can go a long way to cement good relationships in any situation. These phrases are at your disposal for free, as well as are these 100 core Japanese words, which you will learn how to pronounce perfectly.

    Log in to Download Your Free Cheat Sheet - How to Master A Language!

    Also, don’t stop at learning April Fools’ phrases in Japanese - bone up your Japanese language skills with these FREE key phrases. Yes, JapanesePod101 doesn’t joke when it comes to effective, fun and easy learning.

    Now, as a bonus, test our super-learning technology, and learn the Top 1000 most useful phrases in Japanese below! But that’s not all. Read on to learn how you can be eligible for large enrollment discounts at JapanesePod101.

    5. Top 1000 Most Useful Phrases in Japanese - testing new technology

    Help us by being a language guinea pig! Listen to this video above with embedded cutting-edge, frequency-based learning technology that enables you to learn large amounts of data in record time.

    • Note: This technology is in beta-phase of development, and we invite your input for fine-tuning.
    • To participate: Watch the video for instructions, and leave a comment to rate it. Your comment will make you eligible for large enrollment-fee discounts. To watch the video, please click the play button.

    Thank you for helping JapanesePod101! We’re serious about making learning Japanese fun.

    The 5 Aspects of a Great Japanese Course

    I started searching for a Japanese course a little over 6 months ago, when I really started to get interested in language learning. I quickly discovered that there weren’t a lot of options out there for students of the language. The lion’s share of materials were aimed at people learning languages like Spanish or French.

    A few of the most notable courses left me disappointed. They simply didn’t do a good job of teaching the Japanese language. Some of the most popular options didn’t really have that much to offer. In this article we’ll look at 5 aspects of a good Japanese course. We’ll also look at how JapanesePod101, is a rare exception among most courses, as it thoroughly fulfills all 5 aspects.

    Afraid of Japanese Grammar

    1) It isn’t afraid of Japanese grammar

    In the language learning world Japanese grammar is a beast all its own. With attributes such as honorific language, a flexible word order, particles, and clause-modifiers of nouns all work together to make the Japanese grammar system incredibly fascinating, but undeniably difficult for native English speakers. A quick search on Reddit or Quora will reveal a host of puzzled Japanese learners who are doing their best trying to grapple with the language. Linguistically speaking, you can’t get much further from English than Japanese. It’s consistently ranked as one of the hardest languages for native English speakers to learn.

    More often than not a language learning company will slap a Japanese sticker on what’s essentially a Spanish or French course. They make little to no accommodation for the mechanics of the Japanese language. Some language courses even ignore the grammatical difference entirely!

    The way you learn a romance language like Spanish will not be the same way you should approach an asian language like Japanese. One thing I love about JapanesePod101 is that it dives straight into Japanese grammar from the get go. Every lesson highlights a very specific aspect of grammar as it’s used in the audio portion of the podcast, and you are given a list of explanations and example sentences to go along with it.

    It’s essentially as if JapanesePod101 took the best parts of a Japanese language class and put it right at your fingertips.

    Kanji

    2) It doesn’t ignore Kanji or Hiragana

    Just as Japanese grammar is notoriously unique, so is its writing system. In fact it’s writing system is cited as one of the most difficult in the world. This is mainly because it combines 3 different writing systems into one. Hiragana and katakana aren’t usually too hard for native English speakers to pick up, but it’s the logographic Kanji that pose the real challenge.

    9 times out of 10 a Japanese course only includes romaji (Japanese written in latin script) in their learning materials. Users aren’t exposed much, if at all, to the writing system actually used in Japan. Romaji isn’t always bad, and it certainly has its uses, but it’s definitely not a substitute for actual Japanese writing.

    JapanesePod101’s lesson transcripts (available in English, romaji, kanji, and hiragana) are just about the perfect tools for familiarizing yourself with the Japanese writing system while learning grammar and vocabulary. The site’s built in spaced repetition flashcard system is also ideal for committing kanji to memory.

    Listening

    3) Helps you listen in Japanese

    Listening comprehension is an often overlooked skill when learning any foreign language, not just Japanese. It’s one thing to know words when you see them in a textbook or when you speak them. But it’s a whole different ballgame when you try to understand native speakers talking at normal speed. Syllables and sounds gets reduced or dropped and whole phrases are spoken in rapid succession. If you haven’t practiced listening to native speakers then your first Japanese conversation could be a rude awakening.

    This is why good audio courses can be so powerful. If they’re worth their salt they acclimate your ear to the language gradually over time. At first the speakers talk slow and space out their words, but as the course progresses the dialogue becomes more difficult. JapanesePod101 has a great slow playback feature that allows you to listen to individual words at a regular or reduced speed. This is a superb option for easing yourself into the Japanese sound system.

    Vocabulary

    4) Gives you practical vocabulary

    There are a lot of language courses out there that simply fail to provide you with relevant vocabulary that you can actually use in a conversation. This is one of my biggest pet peeves in the language learning world, and I’ve written extensively about language learning programs that do this. You don’t want to spend valuable time and energy learning vocabulary that you’re not likely to use, especially if you’re a beginner.

    Sentences like “the cat drinks milk”, or “the man runs”, just aren’t all that useful in the real world. While there is an aspect of vocabulary that is inevitably personal (your job, personal interests, etc), there are still words, phrases, and grammatical constructions that carry over to a variety of uses. Part of the genius of JapanesePod101 is that each lesson is built around a dialogue between native speakers.

    This is great because you see grammar and vocabulary in action. It’s a lot easier to remember how to make a certain sentence construction when you first heard it in a conversation. The contexts of the podcast are also highly practical. You’re talking to someone on the street, to friends in a restaurant, or maybe speaking with a loved one over the phone. Throughout the podcast series there’s a real push to learn grammar and vocabulary in a practical setting. This is a feature sorely lacking from far too many Japanese courses.

    Listening

    5) It should be interesting, even fun!

    A dull language course is the worst. Language learning isn’t always easy, but that doesn’t mean that it has to be boring. At its heart the language learning process is one of continual discovery, and a good Japanese course should reflect that. Thus I appreciate the hosts in JapanesePod101, because they do a good job of engaging the listener. Even though you are learning a great deal of grammar, vocabulary, and cultural insights; their playful tone and banter help keep things lively and interesting. It’s a far cry from some older more traditional audio courses.

    Final thoughts

    So there you have it, 5 things to look for in a good Japanese course. Remember when learning a foreign language, using a good course or method is important; but even the best course isn’t a substitute for hard work and consistent practice. If you stay focused and put in the effort you will see your language skills improve!