Get up to 35% Off With The Summer Sale. Hurry! Ends Soon!
Get up to 35% Off With The Summer Sale. Hurry! Ends Soon!
JapanesePod101.com Blog
Learn Japanese with Free Daily
Audio and Video Lessons!
Start Your Free Trial 6 FREE Features

Advanced Japanese Lesson:賀正(gashō)

皆さん、明けましておめでとうございます。

これは、新年の一般的な挨拶です。そして、日本では新年のお祝いを葉書きに記して送り合います。これを「年賀状」と呼ぶことは、皆さん、ご存知ですね。

さて、今日はこの年賀状に書かれる決まり文句を紹介しましょう。

冒頭の「明けましておめでとうございます」は最もよく使われる文章です。この他にも「賀正」や「謹賀新年」ということばもしばしば年賀状に書かれます。この二語に共通している漢字は「賀」。この文字を分解すると、上には「加」が下には「貝」が見つかります。

「加」はさらに分解すると「力+口」ですね。これは「口に手を添えて勢いをつける」という状態を記号化した文字です。ここから、「上に何かを乗せる」という意味に変化しました。下に見られる「貝」ですが、これは古代、美しい貝がらを拾ってきては装飾や賞品、貨幣の代わりに使っていたことを表わしています。

これらの意味を組み合わせて、「賀」という文字には「贈り物をうず高く積み上げる」という意味が生まれました。さらに、「物を贈ってお祝いすること」という意味に発展したのです。

「賀正」の「正」は「正月」を意味するため、「正月をお祝いします」という意味。
「謹賀新年」は「失礼のないよう丁寧に新年のお祝いを申し上げます」という意味になります。
「年賀状」にも「賀」が含まれていますね。「新しい年をお祝いする書面」という意味です。

====

Everyone,  Happy New Year!

This is the standard New Year greeting in Japan. We also send and receive postcards with New Year greetings written on them. Did you all know that these are called 年賀状 (ねんがじょう, New Year cards)?

And so today, I’m going to introduce the set phrases which are written on these New Year cards.
The 明けましておめでとうございます (Happy New Year!)  which I mentioned at the outset is the most commonly used phrase.  Aside from this, you’ll also frequently see 賀正(がしょう, gashō) or 謹賀新年 (きんがしんねん),  both of which mean “Happy New Year!” written on New Year cards.

The kanji which is common to both of these phrases is 賀 (が, ‘congratulation’).  If we break down this character into its separate components, we find that above we have 加  (か, ‘addition, increase’) and below we have 貝 (かい, ‘shellfish’).

If we then in turn break down 加, you’ll see that it’s 力(ちから, power)+口 (くち, mouth). This character evolved to symbolize ‘putting the hand along the mouth to encourage someone or oneself’. From this the meaning changed to ‘putting something on top of something else’.

The 貝 which you can see in the lower half of the character expresses the fact that in ancient times beautiful shells were gathered and used for ornaments, prizes or trophies, and were even used instead of money.

If you join these meanings together, you see how the character 賀 came to mean ‘to pile up gifts high in a heap’.  It then developed into the meaning ‘sending gifts and celebrating’.
Because the 正 (しょう、せい, ‘regular, true’) in 賀正 (がしょう, ‘Happy New Year!’) comes from 正月 (しょうがつ, ‘New Year’),  賀正 means ‘to celebrate New Year’.
謹賀新年 (きんがしんねん, Happy New Year!) means ‘in order not to make a slip in etiquette, I offer you courteous congratulations on the New Year’.
In 年賀状 there’s also the character 賀, isn’t there? It means ‘a letter celebrating the New Year’.