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To the native Japanese speakers of JapanesePod101

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misaiah113085
New in Town
Posts: 14
Joined: February 25th, 2010 5:25 am

To the native Japanese speakers of JapanesePod101

Postby misaiah113085 » April 6th, 2010 2:05 am

く vs くて

違いは何ですか

例文:

買わなく  vs  買わなくて

( I ) don't buy and ~ / ( I ) don't buy and ~

習いたく  vs  習いたくて

( I ) want to learn and ~ / ( I ) want to learn and ~

見てほしく vs 見てほしくて

( I ) want (him) to see and ~ / ( I ) want (him) to see and ~

帰ったらしく  vs  帰ったらしくて

it seems (he) has returned and ~ / it seems (he) has returned and ~


?  ?  ?


Please if you have the chance, reply as soon as possible お願いたします!!!

amost
Been Around a Bit
Posts: 46
Joined: April 19th, 2009 10:41 pm

Postby amost » April 7th, 2010 2:29 pm

I am definitely not a native speaker, but hopefully what I say will make sense and actually be somewhat correct.

When the form ends with a 'ku', it kinda turns whatever it is attached to into an adverb. It's better to not think of "and" coming after that, in my opinion. The 'kute' lets you say whatever you want after you did something.

Where the confusion comes in, I think is that there is some overlap. I believe if you end something with 'ku', then next thing you say has to relate. For example, "not A, but B". If you end somethin with 'kute', it MAY do that, or it MAY explain the next thing that happened.

Let me try to give an example using your first line there...

買わなく借りました (I didn't buy it, I rented it) (literally: I not-buyingly rented it) Do you see what I mean by 'turns into adverb?
買わなくて家に帰りました (I didn't buy it, and I went home) I could have said here... "I didn't buy it, and then I went to go walk my dog". The 2 things CAN be related, but they don't HAVE to be.

That's why I think it's weird to use "and" in the definition of the first line, when it seems to me that it belongs only in the second line definition. Anyways, this is what I've interpereted. I could be totally wrong haha...

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misaiah113085
New in Town
Posts: 14
Joined: February 25th, 2010 5:25 am

Postby misaiah113085 » April 8th, 2010 6:23 pm

haha ahhhh this is confusing.

I asked a native speaker about it and this is exactly what she said:

"If you add the word "not", it is not correct to write without て.
So among these sentences only 買わなくis not correct grammatically, in this case 買わずis the correct form."

and then another native speaker said this in Japanese ( but I couldn't exactly understand what he was trying to say):

" 同じ意味のものと 後ろに続く言葉が違うものとがあると思います。 "

Where's Natsuko san when you need her!!!! xP
Last edited by misaiah113085 on April 8th, 2010 11:17 pm, edited 1 time in total.

Javizy
Expert on Something
Posts: 1165
Joined: February 10th, 2007 2:41 pm

Postby Javizy » April 8th, 2010 7:04 pm

Native Japanese speakers know as much about Japanese grammar as the average English speaker does about English grammar. I believe ~く is called an inflectional form. I remember reading an explanation about it in one of the A Dictionary of X Japanese Grammar volumes, which I would recommend to answer all of your grammar questions over a native speaker who isn't a teacher. I should probably look it up again myself.

misaiah113085
New in Town
Posts: 14
Joined: February 25th, 2010 5:25 am

Postby misaiah113085 » April 8th, 2010 11:44 pm

Can you give me a link to this "A Dictionary of X Japanese Grammar" please.
I googled it and got nothing :P


I found these 3 books but nothing with "X" in it. haha at first I thought you wrote "A Dictionary of X Japan Grammar" I was a little curios at first thinking "X Japan teaches Japanese, woah!" haha but anyways are these the books your talking about?
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Javizy
Expert on Something
Posts: 1165
Joined: February 10th, 2007 2:41 pm

Postby Javizy » April 8th, 2010 11:51 pm

Ya. X was to save me typing Beginner/Intermediate/Advanced :D

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