Start Learning Japanese in the next 30 Seconds with
a Free Lifetime Account

Or sign up using Facebook

itadakimasu and gochisosama

Learn Japanese Culture - For anything culture that doesn't fit anywhere else!

Moderators: Admin Team, Moderator Team

oneredice
New in Town
Posts: 7
Joined: February 1st, 2009 7:00 pm

itadakimasu and gochisosama

Postby oneredice » February 3rd, 2009 2:22 am

hi guys,

anyone know what these phrases mean, and why the japanese say them?
i've looked all over, cant seem to find anything about it. even my japanese freinds dont know what they are actually saying.
for ppl unaware of these phrases completely, itadakimasu is ritually said before eating any meal, and gochisosama is said after finishing a meal.

jkid
JapanesePod101.com Team Member
Posts: 403
Joined: July 27th, 2006 9:52 pm
Contact:

Postby jkid » February 3rd, 2009 2:44 am

These phrases are used before and after eating respectively. I personally have never heard these words used.

Get 29% OFF Basic, Premium & Premium PLUS
QuackingShoe
Expert on Something
Posts: 368
Joined: December 2nd, 2007 1:06 pm

Postby QuackingShoe » February 3rd, 2009 3:04 am

'itadakimasu' is the polite form of itadaku, which is the humble form of the verbs morau, taberu, nomu, and some other stuff. So, you're just announcing what you're about to do.

chisou = feast. the method that turns it into gochisousama deshita is the same as what turns tsukareru into otsukaresama deshita.

Neil53
Been Around a Bit
Posts: 44
Joined: May 11th, 2007 3:33 am
Location: Salt Lake City, Utah

Postby Neil53 » February 3rd, 2009 4:14 am

So when you say gochisousama you are thanking them for being the honorable provider of the feast by proclaiming and giving them the title.

Taurus
Expert on Something
Posts: 340
Joined: October 17th, 2007 6:43 am

Postby Taurus » February 3rd, 2009 7:52 am

jkid wrote:I personally have never heard these words used.


Seriously?!! My wife's family and friends *always* use these.

Neil53
Been Around a Bit
Posts: 44
Joined: May 11th, 2007 3:33 am
Location: Salt Lake City, Utah

Postby Neil53 » February 3rd, 2009 8:58 am

Used with most every meal for the older folks. Not so much with younger. Hen ne?

QuackingShoe
Expert on Something
Posts: 368
Joined: December 2nd, 2007 1:06 pm

Postby QuackingShoe » February 3rd, 2009 9:25 am

Danged kids these days, not properly observing their 挨拶.

oneredice
New in Town
Posts: 7
Joined: February 1st, 2009 7:00 pm

Postby oneredice » February 3rd, 2009 10:12 pm

Ahh, well thanks for clarifying that.

And actually, the Japanese people I know are all college students (21+), and I hear them saying it all the time, and this is in America! So don't put us all in the same group as the 'danged kids'

lonna_senpai
Established Presence
Posts: 61
Joined: March 12th, 2007 9:05 am
Location: Florida
Contact:

Too much over use?

Postby lonna_senpai » May 21st, 2009 3:37 am

I am planning on going to Japan in March and am 25. So when do I say these words? At a street vendor ramen shop? Or only at a real nice restaurant? McDonalds? Before I eat a candy bar or onigiri at a convenience store? I want to do it right but I don't want to look like I am trying to hard.
Thanks

Taurus
Expert on Something
Posts: 340
Joined: October 17th, 2007 6:43 am

Postby Taurus » May 21st, 2009 3:41 am

I would say it whenever you like. My wife and I say itadakimasu whenever we eat something together, even if it's just a snack. Gochisosama deshita might sound a little strange at McDonalds, but I'm sure they'll think you're being sweet if you say it, rather than weird.

lonna_senpai
Established Presence
Posts: 61
Joined: March 12th, 2007 9:05 am
Location: Florida
Contact:

Postby lonna_senpai » May 21st, 2009 3:48 am

Thanks for the feedback! Taurus!

Belton
Expert on Something
Posts: 752
Joined: June 16th, 2006 8:39 pm
Location: ロンドン • London
Contact:

Postby Belton » May 21st, 2009 6:03 am

You don't say itadakimasu to waiting staff, but to people eating with you.
It's sort of like grace in the Christian way without religious overtones.
Maybe a bit like Bon Appetite too.
Some people put their hands together in front of them while saying it.
I see it as being grateful for the food and the effort of everyone in getting it to my plate, from the farmer or animal on up. I've gotten into the habit of saying it even when eating a meal alone.
You can also take your lead from the people with you. If they say itadakimasu, you say it too, it's good manners.

Gochisousama deshita, can be said both to the teller, or host, at a restaurant. (Maybe not McD's, or convini etc though) and to anyone treating you to a meal (or snack) either by preparing it or buying it.
"That was a lovely meal, Thanks" to a host, or just another way of saying thanks at a restaurant, saying you enjoyed the experience.

The flip side of this is that English doesn't really have (secular) set phrases before and after meals much to the confusion of my wife.

applezoid
New in Town
Posts: 2
Joined: May 23rd, 2008 10:10 pm

Postby applezoid » May 21st, 2009 12:54 pm

Not only that, but it will impress Japanese people you're with (especially if they're older). I remember a chef at a summer camp I was at always looked extremely pleased when we said gochisosama deshita. And I've heard folks of all ages say it including my girlfriend and her college-aged friends.

I've been told that this practice originally comes from the Shinto tradition, though most people in Japan practice these old traditions secularly.

Jessi
JapanesePod101.com Team Member
Posts: 822
Joined: November 25th, 2007 6:58 pm
Location: Tokyo
Contact:

Postby Jessi » May 21st, 2009 3:09 pm

applezoid wrote:Not only that, but it will impress Japanese people you're with (especially if they're older).


:lol: This is so true! The host family I stayed with for 6 weeks had three generations living together (the grandparents lived together with them) and I remember the grandmother being impressed when I said even simple set phrases. Then she'd tell the grandfather about it. It was cute.
Sorry, kind of off-topic :oops:
♪ JapanesePod101.com ♪ 好評配信中!
Leave us a message in the forum if you have any comments, questions, or feedback!

untmdsprt
Expert on Something
Posts: 775
Joined: May 15th, 2006 7:06 am
Location: Kansas, USA
Contact:

Postby untmdsprt » May 21st, 2009 5:54 pm

Actually my boyfriend and I say it to each other if the other makes the dinner. I also usually say gochisosama deshita at a ramen shop or other restaurants where it has one or two people doing everything. They seem more pleased at me than other foreigners when I do say it.

I wonder if I can get into the habit of saying both when I'm with my boyfriend and other friends. It certainly would be good to start doing more things the Japanese way. ;)


Return to “General Japanese Culture”