Dialogue

Vocabulary

Learn New Words FAST with this Lesson’s Vocab Review List

Get this lesson’s key vocab, their translations and pronunciations. Sign up for your Free Lifetime Account Now and get 7 Days of Premium Access including this feature.

Or sign up using Facebook
Already a Member?

Lesson Notes

Unlock In-Depth Explanations & Exclusive Takeaways with Printable Lesson Notes

Unlock Lesson Notes and Transcripts for every single lesson. Sign Up for a Free Lifetime Account and Get 7 Days of Premium Access.

Or sign up using Facebook
Already a Member?

Lesson Transcript

Talking Japanese Culture, Season 1, Lesson 19 –
Top 5 Things You Need to Know About Credit Cards in Japan
[INTRO]
Hello, and welcome to JapanesePod101.com.
I’m Eric.
In this lesson we will talk about the “Top 5 Things You Need to Know About Credit Cards in Japan”.
===
The first topic (on the list) is about credit card (J: kurejitto kādo) usage in Japan.
As of March 2014, there were some 300 million
credit cards in circulation in Japan.
But the reality is that cash still plays a dominant role
for many transactions, and there are far fewer
people using credit cards in Japan than in other
countries.
In fact, data for 2014 shows that people used
credit cards for only 18 percent of their total
spending in Japan, compared to the United
States where credit card and debit card
shopping accounted for more than half of
total spending.
===
The next topic (on the list) is about reward points (J: pointo), a popular incentive program where a
percentage of the amount spent is paid back to
the card holder.
Given that the return average of Japanese credit
cards is 0.5 percent, we can say that any cards
offering 1 percent or more rewards should be
seen as attractive.
Some of the major credit cards known for offering
higher reward rates are “Recruit card Plus” (J: Rikurūto Kādo Purasu) and “Life Card” (J: Raifu Kādo).
===
The next topic (on the list) is about airline credit
cards and frequent flyer miles.
If you fly often with ANA, then an “ANA American
Express Card” (J: ANA Amerikan Ekisupuresu Kādo) would be the best choice,
because with this card, you can get an extra 10
percent of the miles you earn every time you fly with them.
This card also lets you earn ANA Frequent Flyer
Miles as you top up your “Suica” e-money card.
Meanwhile, the “JAL Card” (J: Jaru Kādo) is a must-have if you are a frequent flyer on JAL, because this card lets you
earn miles for every 100 yen spent at partner
stores.
===
The next topic (on the list) is about credit cards with special shopping deals. 
Before signing up for a credit card, try checking out if the shops you go to often have their own credit cards.
For instance, if you often shop at Aeon shopping malls, then the “Aeon Card” (J: Ion Kādo) is the best choice, because the card offers you shopping insurance as well as special discounts when you shop at Aeon and its affiliated stores.
If you like online shopping, take a look at the “Rakuten Card” (J: Rakuten Kādo). With zero annual membership fee, you can get double reward points whenever you purchase things at the Rakuten online shopping mall.
===
The last topic is about credit cards with the Pasmo or Suica e-money function.
If you often use e-money such as PASMO or SUICA, then you might want to consider combining those functions with a credit card to help you earn more reward points.
For example, if you travel often with ANA airlines, then you might want to have an “ANA VISA SUICA Card” because it lets you earn more ANA miles as you use Suica e-money.
===
That’s all we have for this lesson.
Getting a yen-based credit card will surely make your life easier in Japan, but you should do a little bit of research before choosing one, because there are pros and cons for each.
Do you have any experience getting a Japanese credit card?
Leave us a comment and let us know!
Thanks for listening and we’ll see you next time. Bye!

Kanji

Review & Remember All Kanji from this Lesson

Get complete breakdowns, review with quizzes and download printable practice sheets! Sign up for your Free Lifetime Account Now and get 7 Days of Premium Access including this feature.

Or sign up using Facebook
Already a Member?

5 Comments

Hide
Please to leave a comment.
😄 😞 😳 😁 😒 😎 😠 😆 😅 😜 😉 😭 😇 😴 😮 😈 ❤️️ 👍

JapanesePod101.com Verified
November 14th, 2015 at 06:30 PM
Pinned Comment
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Do you have any experience getting a Japanese credit card?

JapanesePod101.com Verified
December 19th, 2018 at 11:00 AM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Hi Jeff,


Thank you for posting!

I'm really sorry for the late reply...


Yes, actually Amex card is now easily accepted in Japan after affiliating with JCB.

In Japan, credit cards are overwhelming popular than debit cards.

And now there's a lot of types of credit cards and the number of users are getting increasing.

In fact, however, there are also many people that have trust in cash.


Hope you will visit Japan again!


Sincerely,

Miho

Team JapanesePod101.com

JapanesePod101.com Verified
July 27th, 2018 at 09:44 PM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Hi Sean,


Thank you very much for the comment! Glad to hear the info was useful to you.


Thank you for studying with JapanesePod101.com!


Sincerely,

Miki H

Team JapanesePod101.com

Jeff
July 27th, 2018 at 08:14 AM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

It was a little surprising for me to hear about the ANA Amex card; after all it's hard to find stores in the US that accept Amex. Is it really easier in Japan? I never bothered to check that aspect when I visited last year.


Have Japanese begun to embrace the bank debit card as a safe, efficient replacement for cash and coins?

Sean
July 27th, 2018 at 06:38 AM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Very interesting, thank you! I always thought it's difficult to get a credit card in Japan if you aren't a Japanese national but very cool info!