Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Chigusa: ちぐさです。(Chigusa desu.)
Peter: Peter here, Sights and Sounds, Lesson 14, Long Queue. Chigusa-San?
Chigusa: はい。(Hai.)
Peter: この写真は、どうでしょうか。(Kono shashin wa, dō deshō ka.)
Chigusa: たくさん人が並んでます。(Takusan hito ga narande masu.)
Peter: Yeah, there’s a lot of people lined up. みんな一体、何待ってますか。(Minna ittai, nani matte masu ka.)
Chigusa: パスタ食べ放題じゃないですか。(Pasuta tabehōdai ja nai desu ka.)
Peter: Ah, they’re waiting for the all-you-can-eat pasta. 気づかなかったです。(Kizukanakatta desu.) I didn’t realize that. 前の話と繋がってるんですね。(Mae no hanashi to tsunagatte ru n desu ne.)
Chigusa: そうですね。ちょっと看板が、右の端っこに少し見えてますね。(Sō desu ne. Chotto kanban ga, migi no hajikko ni sukoshi miete masu ne.)
Peter: 本当ですか。(Hontō desu ka.)
Chigusa: はい。前の写真の右側にあった看板が少し見えてます。(Hai. Mae no shashin no migigawa ni atta kanban ga sukoshi miete masu.)
Peter: すごいです。(Sugoi desu.) That’s pretty good. I didn’t even notice that, Chigusa.
Chigusa: Really?
Peter: Yeah.
Chigusa: It’s so obvious.
Peter: What are you trying to say? All right. Well, Sherlock, why don’t we take a look at the conversation and see what’s going on here. Okay, who’s in the conversation?
Chigusa: マリ (Mari) and マキ (Maki)
Peter: And they are speaking in the informal, so again, casual Japanese. And you know what, looking at the conversation, I am...yeah, you’re right. This is the same person... なんか、恥ずかしいです。(Nanka, hazukashii desu.) Okay, so, Chigusa-San, take us into the lesson.
Chigusa: Okay. So, let’s listen to today’s conversation.
DIALOGUE
A: うん。パスタは大好きだし、食べたーい。 (Un. Pasuta wa daisuki da shi, tabetāi.)
B: うわっ、すごく並んでるよ。 (Uwa, sugoku narande ru yo.)
A: えーっ。どれくらい? (Ē. Dore kurai?)
B: 5組、いや6組くらいは待ってるよ。 (Go-kumi, iya rokkumi kurai wa matte ru yo.)
A: 待つのは嫌ね。やっぱり、やめようか。 (Matsu no wa iya ne. Yappari, yameyō ka.)
B: やめましょう。クレープでも食べに行きましょうよ。 (Yamemashō. Kurēpu demo tabe ni ikimashō yo.)
もう一度、お願いします。今度は、ゆっくりお願いします。(Mō ichi-do, onegai shimasu. Kondo wa, yukkuri onegai shimasu.)
A: うん。パスタは大好きだし、食べたーい。 (Un. Pasuta wa daisuki da shi, tabetāi.)
B: うわっ、すごく並んでるよ。 (Uwa, sugoku narande ru yo.)
A: えーっ。どれくらい? (Ē. Dore kurai?)
B: 5組、いや6組くらいは待ってるよ。 (Go-kumi, iya rokkumi kurai wa matte ru yo.)
A: 待つのは嫌ね。やっぱり、やめようか。 (Matsu no wa iya ne. Yappari, yameyō ka.)
B: やめましょう。クレープでも食べに行きましょうよ。 (Yamemashō. Kurēpu demo tabe ni ikimashō yo.)
今度は、英語が入ります。(Kondo wa, Eigo ga hairimasu.)
A: うん。パスタは大好きだし、食べたーい。 (Un. Pasuta wa daisuki da shi, tabetāi.)
Sure, I love pasta. I wanna have some.
B: うわっ、すごく並んでるよ。 (Uwa, sugoku narande ru yo.)
Wow, there's a long line.
A: えーっ。どれくらい? (Ē. Dore kurai?)
What? How long?
B: 5組、いや6組くらいは待ってるよ。 (Go-kumi, iya rokkumi kurai wa matte ru yo.)
There are about five or six parties already in line.
A: 待つのは嫌ね。やっぱり、やめようか。 (Matsu no wa iya ne. Yappari, yameyō ka.)
I don't wanna wait. Should we give up on this place?
B: やめましょう。クレープでも食べに行きましょうよ。 (Yamemashō. Kurēpu demo tabe ni ikimashō yo.)
Yes, let's...let's go get crêpes.
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Peter: ちぐささん、この会話、どうでしたか。(Chigusa-san, kono kaiwa, dō deshita ka.)
Chigusa: うーん、やっぱり並ぶのは嫌ですよね。(Ūn, yappari narabu no wa iya desu yo ne.)
Peter: Definitely! Nobody likes to wait. But actually, in Japan, I notice a lot of people like to go where there’s a lot of people because they feel like they can trust the quality of the food.
Chigusa: That’s true.
Peter: Right?
Chigusa: Yes.
Peter: So, the longer the line, the more people wanna go there.
Chigusa: Yeah, but I don’t go with that trend.
Peter: Really?
Chigusa: Because I hate lining up.
Peter: Really?
Chigusa: Yes.
Peter: What’s the most you wait?
Chigusa: Mmm, 20 minutes.
Peter: That’s...that’s a pretty short amount of time.
Chigusa: If I really wanna go to the place, but if it’s like I’ve never been to that place and I have to wait for more than 20 minutes, I would never wait. If I already know that that place is good and if I feel that it’s worth the wait, I would wait.
Peter: But otherwise…
Chigusa: But otherwise, never.
Peter: 了解しました。(Ryōkai shimashita.) I got it. Okay, let’s take a look at the vocab.
VOCAB LIST AND PHRASE USAGE
Peter: Now, again, we start off with…
Chigusa: 並ぶ (narabu) [natural native speed]
Peter: to line up
Chigusa: 並ぶ (narabu) [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Chigusa: 並ぶ (narabu) [natural native speed]
Peter: Followed by…
Chigusa: 組 (kumi) [natural native speed]
Peter: group
Chigusa: 組 (kumi) [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Chigusa: 組 (kumi) [natural native speed]
Peter: Now, in Japanese schools, usually, the classes are broken into 組 (kumi), right?
Chigusa: Right.
Peter: So, if it’s one school, the sixth grade will have a certain number of 組 (kumi).
Chigusa: Mmm.
Peter: And usually, how many kids are in a class?
Chigusa: I’m not sure because I’ve never been to a Japanese school, but I imagine like maybe 40.
Peter: Yeah, about 20 to 40, kind of depending on the school.
Chigusa: Yeah.
Peter: And I imagine now in some places in Japan, they even combine two grades, because there’s such a shortage of kids.
Chigusa: Really?
Peter: Yeah.
Chigusa: Wow.
Peter: Chigusa-San, can you give us some other words associated with 組 (kumi)?
Chigusa: There is 二人組 (futarigumi).
Peter: “Two people.” And notice that the 組 (kumi) becomes…
Chigusa: ぐみ (gumi)
Peter: Give it to us one more time.
Chigusa: 二人組 (futarigumi)
Peter: “Two-person group.”
Chigusa: If you wanna make it a group of three, you can say 三人組 (san-ningumi).
Peter: And this goes so on and so on.
Chigusa: Yes.
Peter: Now, there, we’re using numbers plus 組 (kumi). We can also use colors plus 組 (kumi), and we’re gonna go through some of this and we’ll tell you the significance because there’s a few of them. As soon as you hear, something instantly pops into your head. So, can you give us a color plus 組 (kumi)?
Chigusa: 紅組 (akagumi), 白組 (shirogumi)
Peter: Again, notice how 組 (kumi) changes to ぐみ (gumi). And Chigusa-San, if I were to say to you, 紅組 (akagumi) or 白組 (shirogumi), what would you think of?
Chigusa: I would think of 紅白歌合戦 (kōhaku utagassen).
Peter: Which is?
Chigusa: It’s a national TV program that’s broadcasted at the end of the year.
Peter: And they are the two groups, the 紅組 (akagumi) and 白組 (shirogumi) have a singing competition.
Chigusa: Yes. The 紅組 (akagumi) is consisted of women and 白組 (shirogumi) is made up of male singers.
Peter: So, and they battle it out. So, this word 組 (kumi) and also when something precedes it, ぐみ (gumi), you’re gonna come across quite a bit. Then we have...
Chigusa: 嫌 (iya) [natural native speed]
Peter: disagreeable
Chigusa: 嫌 (iya) [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Chigusa: 嫌 (iya) [natural native speed]
Peter: And finally…
Chigusa: 止める (yameru) [natural native speed]
Peter: to stop
Chigusa: 止める (yameru) [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Chigusa: 止める (yameru) [natural native speed]

Lesson focus

Peter: Okay. So, let’s take a quick look at the conversation. First line, we have…
Chigusa: うん。パスタは大好きだし、食べたーい。 (Un. Pasuta wa daisuki da shi, tabetāi.)
Peter: Okay, two points of interest here, the だし (da shi) that follows 大好き (daisuki). Now, this means “in addition to.” So, in addition to the fact that I like it, it’s cheap, it’s all-you-can eat, you know, something like this. There’s another factor that’s driving her to go. Then, 食べたーい (tabetāi) is the intonation here that’s quite interesting. Chigusa-San, give it to us one more time.
Chigusa: 食べたーい (tabetāi)
Peter: Holding it at the end there does show that you really wanna do it, that emotion getting into it. This is followed by, next line.
Chigusa: うわっ、すごく並んでるよ。 (Uwa, sugoku narande ru yo.)
Peter: Okay. The うわっ (uwa), interjection of surprise, “whoa.” Then we have…
Chigusa: すごく並んでるよ (sugoku narande ru yo)
Peter: すごく (sugoku) is the adverbial form of すごい (sugoi), which is “very.” This is modifying 並んでる (narande ru). And 並んでる (narande ru), actually, we don’t pronounce the い (i) in いる (iru), so it’s just 並んでる (narande ru). So, this means “very lined up.” So, literally, we have, “Wow, very lined up.” But Chigusan-San, what’s “very lined up”?
Chigusa: The people.
Peter: Yeah. And we don’t have to say this because it could be inferred because they’re looking at it. うわっ、すごく並んでる。(Uwa, sugoku narande ru.) It’s like they’re really lined up, the people. And again, we have present progressive, the いる (iru), 〜ている (-te iru) but again, this is a state. They’re in a state of being lined up. This is followed by…
Chigusa: えーっ。どれくらい? (Ē. Dore kurai?)
Peter: Huh. About how many? Literally though, this is “which about.” But again, when asked about, “About how much?” you can use どれくらい (dore kurai). This is followed by…
Chigusa: 5組、6組くらいは待ってるよ。 (Go-kumi, rokkumi kurai wa matte ru yo.)
Peter: There are about five or six groups waiting. And again, this is straightforward, “five, six groups about waiting?” So, this is very similar to what we’ve come across in English. Next, we have…
Chigusa: 待つのは嫌ね。やっぱり、やめようか。 (Matsu no wa iya ne. Yappari, yameyō ka.)
Peter: “I don’t like to wait. You wanna forget about this place?” Now, key point here, what we really focus on today is this first sentence, 待つのは嫌 (matsu no wa iya). So, we have a verb in the dictionary form, followed by の (no). Instead of “we’ll wait,” when we add the の (no), this becomes “to wait.” So, “to wait” marked by は (wa), the topic marking particle. “To wait” followed by 嫌 (iya) is disagreeable. “To wait, I don’t like.” So, the way you nominalize a verb, one of the ways to nominalize a verb in Japanese is you attach a の (no) to the end of it. Now, be careful. This is quite different than than the の (no) at the end of a sentence, which adds emphasis to what you’re talking about, very different. Usually, a telltale sign is when the の (no), [verb] の (no) followed by は (wa). Now, we’re talking about a nominalized verb and here, that’s exactly what we’re talking about. Then finally, in the last line, we have…
Chigusa: やめましょう。クレープでも食べに行きましょうよ。 (Yamemashō. Kurēpu demo tabe ni ikimashō yo.)
Peter: “Yeah, let’s forget about this place. Let’s go get a crepe.” 二人は面白いですね。(Futari wa omoshiroi desu ne.) These two are quite interesting. I mean, they went from...what did they eat first?
Chigusa: Chinese.
Peter: Chinese to an all-you-can-eat Italian. And finally to…
Chigusa: Crepes.
Peter: ちぐささん、いかがでしょうか。(Chigusa-san, ikaga deshō ka.) What do you think?
Chigusa: This is totally understandable to girls like me.
Peter: Really?
Chigusa: I think most girls would find this pretty normal.
Peter: That’s remarkable because, I don’t know. Maybe, yeah. Maybe, I’m just… old.
Chigusa: Because, well, at the end, we like to end with a good dessert, you know.
Peter: Interesting. So yeah, we’re gonna need some feedback from everybody out there. Is this considered a normal eating pattern?
Chigusa: It’s pig-out day, probably for Mari and Maki.
Peter: 食べ放題の日ですね。(Tabehōdai no hi desu ne.) Do you have that in Japanese, pig-out day?
Chigusa: I don’t know. I think we do.
Peter: And how would you say it?
Chigusa: We don’t have a word, but やけ食い (yakegui).
Peter: やけ食い?(Yakegui?)
Chigusa: やけ食い (yakegui) is what people do when there’s, like something bad in their lives and they wanna forget about it by eating.
Peter: Really?
Chigusa: Yeah, they go to やけ食い (yakegui).
Peter: やけ食い。(Yakegui.) Now, 食い (gui), it comes from 食う (kū) “to eat,” which is a colloquial way to say “to eat.” What is やけ (yake)?
Chigusa: やけになる。(Yake ni naru.) やけになる (yake ni naru) is like you don’t care what happens.
Peter: Due to some kind of psychological or emotional stress?
Chigusa: Yes.
Peter: あ〜、やけ食い。(Ā, yakegui.) Thank you, Chigusa-San. This is a word I hope I never have to...but I can understand this. But again, hopefully, we never have to use this.
Chigusa: やけ酒 (yakezake) is alcohol that you drink after something bad happens to you and you really don’t care.
Peter: Yeah. I was kind of trying to avoid that one. Thanks, Chigusa-San. Hopefully, someone...hang on to the wagon, guys. Just because you know the term doesn’t mean you have to do it. And before you try it, やけ酒 (yakezake), try the やけ食い (yakegui), please. Oh, Chigusa-San.

Outro

Peter: All right. That’s gonna do it for today.
Chigusa: またね!(Mata ne!)
A: うん。パスタは大好きだし、食べたーい。 (Un. Pasuta wa daisuki da shi, tabetāi.)
B: うわっ、すごく並んでるよ。 (Uwa, sugoku narande ru yo.)
A: えーっ。どれくらい? (Ē. Dore kurai?)
B: 5組、いや6組くらいは待ってるよ。 (Go-kumi, iya rokkumi kurai wa matte ru yo.)
A: 待つのは嫌ね。やっぱり、やめようか。 (Matsu no wa iya ne. Yappari, yameyō ka.)
B: やめましょう。クレープでも食べに行きましょうよ。 (Yamemashō. Kurēpu demo tabe ni ikimashō yo.)

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19 Comments

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😄 😞 😳 😁 😒 😎 😠 😆 😅 😜 😉 😭 😇 😴 😮 😈 ❤️️ 👍

JapanesePod101.com Verified
April 5th, 2008 at 06:30 PM
Pinned Comment
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Mina-san, what's the best line you've ever waited in?

stlsamurai
April 9th, 2008 at 01:58 AM
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I noticed that some restaurants in Japan (Nagoya, from my experience) have chairs along the wall for people to sit in while they wait in line. I haven't seen that in other countries.


Steve from St. Louis

Abrassart
April 8th, 2008 at 04:53 PM
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"I never get the Premium Lessons through iTunes."


Me too. :???:

JapanesePod101.com Verified
April 8th, 2008 at 02:16 AM
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Sasquatchuaさん、Lizさん、Rhysさん、


me too! we've been looking into it. this is very strange... it might be a problem with the site hosting us.... 申し訳ございません!

Sasquatchua
April 8th, 2008 at 02:07 AM
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I normally do get the Premium lessons in iTunes, but this time not a single file from Saturday come through for me on the premium iTunes feed either.

markystar
April 7th, 2008 at 06:58 PM
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AndamanIslanderさん、


sure! my top 3, in no particular order are:


:kokoro: アフリ afuri (恵比寿)

柚子塩


:kokoro: バサノバ bassa nova (新代田) 

タイカレースタイル


:kokoro: なんつッ亭 nantsuttei (品川)  

豚骨


i take my ramen very serious! :mrgreen:

AndamanIslander
April 7th, 2008 at 06:06 PM
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Markysan!


Can you post your top 3 ramen-ya in tokyo?

markystar
April 6th, 2008 at 11:46 PM
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if you want to eat good ramen in tokyo, you have to wait for it.


also, i waited with my girlfriend for 1 hour and 45 minutes for crispy creme donuts in shinjuku when the store was new. that totally sucked, but after i ate a few it was all good! :lol:

Liz21
April 6th, 2008 at 11:04 PM
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For some reason, I never get the Premium Lessons through iTunes.:shock:

A person
April 6th, 2008 at 10:19 PM
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They sure do: https://www.youtube.com/v/5-4CzVVCQMo&hl=en

kitty-chan
April 6th, 2008 at 06:46 PM
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I hate waiting in line, but it seems like people wait in a lot of lines in Japan. :lol: :lol: :lol: