Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Jessi: The Hardest Way to Break the Ice in Japan!
Naomi: ナオミです。(Naomi desu.)
Peter: Peter here.
Peter: Naomi-sensei,
Naomi: はい。(Hai.)
Peter: 今日は、元気ですか。(Kyō wa, genki desu ka.)
Naomi: 元気です。ピーターさんは、元気ですか。(Genki desu. Pītā-san wa, genki desu ka.)
Peter: 風邪です。(Kaze desu.)
Naomi: Ah..
Peter: I have a cold, still.
Naomi: That’s too bad.
Peter: You don’t seem too overly concerned. 夏風邪 (natsukaze), summer cold and in Japan, it’s said that summer colds are…
Naomi: Only for ばか (baka).
Peter: Ah.. what?
Naomi: Sorry for the bad language but we say 夏風邪をひくのはばか (natsukaze o hiku no wa baka).
Peter: I thought it was said that it takes a while to get over them.
Naomi: Ah…
Peter: Yeah.
Naomi: Yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah. They also said that that but umm…we also say 夏風邪をひくのはばか (natsukaze o hiku no wa baka), which means only the stupid catch cold in summer.
Peter: Didn’t you just get over cold?
Naomi: I don’t know what you are talking about.
Peter: Oh, Naomi-sensei!
Naomi: わかりません。(Wakarimasen.)
Peter: 教えてあげましょうか。(Oshiete agemashō ka.) Shall I teach you?
Naomi: Anyway. レッスンをしましょう。(Ressun o shimashō.)
Peter: Anyway, yes. Umm, well now that you introduced such a high class word, maybe we should explain it to everybody what does ばか (baka) mean?
Naomi: Ah 馬鹿 (baka) the kanji of 馬 (ba) means horse. The kanji of 鹿 (ka) means deer. Can you guess the meaning?
Peter: Well it’s not fair because I have been studying for a while and I think I have a theory. So I think only a fool can’t tell the difference between a horse and a deer.
Naomi: ああ、すごい。さすが。(Ā, sugoi. Sasuga.)
Peter: ありがとうございます。(Arigatō gozaimasu.) So that’s where some people believe this word comes from. You have the kanji for the horse and the deer and only the fools can’t tell the difference but it is quite a strong word.
Naomi: そうですね。(Sō desu ne.)
Peter: Depending on the context of course.
Naomi: Peter and I are good friends I guess. So I think it’s – I thought it’s okay to use the word ばか (baka), but I didn’t really mean to, you know.
Peter: It is okay Naomi-sensei, but we want to warn you don’t use this in the classroom.
Naomi: No.
Peter: Don’t use this with people, who you are not very familiar with, don’t use this in business situations or any other. It’s kind of only with like really good friends and make sure you really understand the situation but at the same time, you shouldn’t even be using it. You should just understand it so you can passively absorb it and not miss out on what’s being said. Ah so that’s why you taught it, Naomi-sensei. すばらしい (subarashii) which means excellent, amazing. Great teacher, すばらしい先生ですね (subarashii sensei desu ne) and not because you wanted to personally insult me.
Naomi: I didn’t insult you.
Peter: Ah who has the cold?
Naomi: Nobody.
Peter: Okay, little carried away with the opening but too much fun.
Naomi: はい。(Hai.)
Peter: So Naomi-sensei, what are we talking about today?
Naomi: 今日は (kyō wa) temperature, 暑い (atsui) and 寒い (samui), 涼しい (suzushii), 暖かい (atatakai).
Peter: So talking about the temperature.
Naomi: はい。(Hai.)
Peter: And talking about the temperature with adjectives.
Naomi: Yes. い (i) ending adjectives.
Peter: Now in Japanese, adjectives are usually broken into two categories. i-adjectives, adjectives that end in い (i) and na-adjectives, adjectives which when they are placed in front of a noun need a な (na) which require a な (na) to be placed in between the adjective and the noun. So we will get into more discussion about this later but for now, we are going to look at i-adjectives. With that said, let’s take a look at today’s conversation. Here we go.
DIALOGUE
北川 冬果 (Kitagawa Fuyuka) : おはようございます。(Ohayō gozaimasu.)
西本 秋 (Nishimoto Shū) : おはようございます。冬果さん。今日は暑いですね。(Ohayō gozaimasu. Fuyuka-san. Kyō wa atsui desu ne.)
北川 冬果 (Kitagawa Fuyuka) : そうですね。でも、ここはとても涼しいですね。(ハクション!)(Sō desu ne. Demo, koko wa totemo suzushii desu ne. (Hakushon!))
西本 秋 (Nishimoto Shū) : 寒いですか。(Samui desu ka.)
北川 冬果 (Kitagawa Fuyuka) : 寒くないです。ちょうどいいです。(ハクション!ハクション!)(Samukunai desu. Chōdo ii desu. (Hakushon! Hakushon!))
もう一度お願いします。今度はゆっくりお願いします。(Mō ichi-do onegai shimasu. Kondo wa yukkuri onegai shimasu.)
北川 冬果 (Kitagawa Fuyuka) : おはようございます。(Ohayō gozaimasu.)
西本 秋 (Nishimoto Shū) : おはようございます。冬果さん。今日は暑いですね。(Ohayō gozaimasu. Fuyuka-san. Kyō wa atsui desu ne.)
北川 冬果 (Kitagawa Fuyuka) : そうですね。でも、ここはとても涼しいですね。(Sō desu ne. Demo, koko wa totemo suzushii desu ne.)
西本 秋 (Nishimoto Shū) : 寒いですか。(Samui desu ka.)
北川 冬果 (Kitagawa Fuyuka) : 寒くないです。ちょうどいいです。(Samukunai desu. Chōdo ii desu.)
次は、英語が入ります。(Tsugi wa, Eigo ga hairimasu.)
北川 冬果 (Kitagawa Fuyuka) : おはようございます。(Ohayō gozaimasu.)
FUYUKA KITAGAWA: Good morning.
西本 秋 (Nishimoto Shū) : おはようございます。冬果さん。今日は暑いですね。(Ohayō gozaimasu. Fuyuka-san. Kyō wa atsui desu ne.)
SHŪ NISHIMOTO: Good morning, Fuyuka. It's hot today, isn't it?
北川 冬果 (Kitagawa Fuyuka) : そうですね。でも、ここはとても涼しいですね。(ハクション!)(Sō desu ne. Demo, koko wa totemo suzushii desu ne. (Hakushon!))
FUYUKA KITAGAWA: Yes, it is. But it's very cool in here, isn't it? (Achoo!-sneezing sound)
西本 秋 (Nishimoto Shū) : 寒いですか。(Samui desu ka.)
SHŪ NISHIMOTO: Is it cold?
北川 冬果 (Kitagawa Fuyuka) : 寒くないです。ちょうどいいです。(ハクション!ハクション!)(Samukunai desu. Chōdo ii desu. (Hakushon! Hakushon!))
FUYUKA KITAGAWA: It's not cold. It's just right. (Achoo! Achoo! -sneezing sound)
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Peter: Naomi-sensei, what did you think of today’s conversation?
Naomi: I think the adjectives that we introduced in the dialogues are so useful.
Peter: My first Japanese teacher told me, the Japanese are always talking about the weather.
Naomi: Because it’s the safest topic.
Peter: Yes. I find like this is the most common topic in elevators.
Naomi: Oh yeah. そうですね。(Sō desu ne.)
Peter: Because it’s the elevator talk. You only have 30 seconds or so to talk about nothing and it’s kind of better than silence. So now that it’s summer here, if I am in an elevator and a Japanese person comes in or if I am coming in and the person coming in is usually the one required to speak and 暑いですね (atsui desu ne).
Naomi: Kind of like how are you in English. We can say 元気ですか (genki desu ka).
Peter: How are you?
Naomi: But we tend to talk about the weather a lot.
Peter: Yeah, so today’s topics will help you out. So next time, you are on the elevator with a Japanese person, this should come in handy. Okay, so let’s first take a look at the vocab.
VOCAB LIST
Peter: Naomi-sensei, what do we have first?
Naomi: 今日 (kyō)
Peter: Today.
Naomi: (slow) きょう (kyō) (natural speed) 今日 (kyō)
Peter: Now we will stress this over and over. Now is the perfect time to get into kanji. Kanji is so fascinating and there is so much logic behind it. Now let’s take the word for today, which is one more time?
Naomi: 今日 (kyō)
Peter: Long vowel, 今日 (kyō). You want to hold it. Now this is made up of two characters. The first character is
Naomi: Now.
Peter: The second character is
Naomi: Day.
Peter: Now day, today.
Naomi: はい。(Hai.) And I think that it has the irregular reading.
Peter: Correct. So while the meaning is logical sometimes it’s the reading that will throw you off but that’s what we are here for to get you through this, but so logical.
Naomi: そうですね。(Sō desu ne.)
Peter: Next we have
Naomi: 暑い (atsui)
Peter: Hot.
Naomi: (slow) あつい (atsui) (natural speed) 暑い (atsui)
Peter: Next.
Naomi: でも (demo)
Peter: But, however
Naomi: (slow) でも (demo) (natural speed) でも (demo)
Peter: This is but and however but this is primarily used at the beginning of sentences. Now the particle が (ga) can also be used as but and that’s a conjunctive particle. So here we have でも (demo) but this comes at the beginning of a sentence. Next we have
Naomi: とても (totemo)
Peter: Very, extremely.
Naomi: (slow) とても (totemo) (natural speed) とても (totemo)
Peter: Followed by
Naomi: 涼しい (suzushii)
Peter: Cool.
Naomi: (slow) すずしい (suzushii) (natural speed) すずしい (suzushii)
Peter: And this is cool not in the English sense that it’s cool but in the weather sense…
Naomi: そうですね。(Sō desu ne.)
Peter: That it’s…
Naomi: Only the temperature.
Peter: Yes. How could we say cool?
Naomi: It depends on who you are talking to but かっこいい (kakkoii).
Peter: There is the word we are looking for.
Naomi: はい。(Hai.) Or just いい (ii).
Peter: Give us かっこいい (kakkoii), one more time.
Naomi: かっこいい (kakkoii)
Peter: And just break it down.
Naomi: (slow) かっこいい (kakkoii) (natural speed) かっこいい (kakkoii)
Peter: And pitch accent here, we are going
Naomi: かっこいい (kakkoii)
Peter: So low
Naomi: High
Peter: High.
Naomi: And low at the いい (ii).
Peter: So one more time.
Naomi: かっこいい (kakkoii)
Peter: かっこいい (kakkoii)
Naomi: Perfect.
Peter: And let’s just go with the pitch accent of the words we didn’t cover up to this point. What do we have? We will start out with today.
Naomi: (slow) きょう (kyō) (natural speed) 今日 (kyō)
Peter: Going down.
Naomi: はい、そうです。(Hai, sō desu.)
Peter: 今日 (kyō)
Naomi: はい。(Hai.)
Peter: Followed by
Naomi: 暑い (atsui)
Peter: Going up.
Naomi: And down.
Peter: 暑い (atsui)
Naomi: そうです。(Sō desu.) Low at い (i).
Peter: Followed by
Naomi: でも (demo)
Peter: Going down.
Naomi: はい。(Hai.)
Peter: でも (demo), followed by
Naomi: とても (totemo)
Peter: Going up.
Naomi: And stays
Peter: とても (totemo)
Naomi: そうです。(Sō desu.)
Peter: Followed by
Naomi: 涼しい (suzushii)
Peter: Going up and coming down.
Naomi: はい (hai), at い (i).
Peter: So すずしい (suzushii).
Naomi: はい、そうです。(Hai, sō desu.)
Peter: Back down.
Naomi: はい。(Hai.)
Peter: Uhh this is getting to be really fun. Next we have.
Naomi: 寒い (samui)
Peter: Cold.
Naomi: (slow) さむい (samui) (natural speed) 寒い (samui)
Peter: And this one again is going up and coming back down. Most of the i-adjectives come back down. Don’t they?
Naomi: Uhoo, right.
Peter: So 寒い (samui).
Naomi: そうです。(Sō desu.)
Peter: Now again I said this in a previous one but in case you are joining us now and you didn’t get the old lessons, this can also be used. Well actually a derivative of this can also be used to mean not funny.
Naomi: Hah!
Peter: Naomi-sensei, as you are in such a generous mood to teach people slang today, why don’t you take this away?
Naomi: 例えば (tatoeba) Peter, your joke is so 寒い (samui).
Peter: Not funny.
Naomi: えっと多分、ピーターさんのジョークは寒いです。(Etto tabun, Pītā-san no jōku wa samui desu.)
Peter: Peter’s jokes are not funny.
Naomi: It’s just a sample sentence. Don’t take it personal.
Peter: Oh Naomi-sensei. It is so much fun to work with you. So if someone says a joke and it’s not funny, you can say to them,
Naomi: 寒い (samui)
Peter: And I think they will be a little shocked.
Naomi: そうですね。(Sō desu ne.)
Peter: I was back in New York and I had been in Japan for a few years and we met these Japanese people on train and we started talking and somebody said something that wasn’t funny and I said, 寒い (samui) and they are like, ん?今日は暑いですよ (N? Kyō wa atsui desu yo), like today is hot. Like didn’t understand that I was trying to make a joke. They didn’t think that I had that much knowledge and he is like wow! But actually maybe to be more understood, you should probably just say さむっ (samu).
Naomi: そうですね。さむっ。(Sō desu ne. Samu.)
Peter: And because of the way I said it, it kind of seemed like I was talking about the temperature and not you know, making a joke. So maybe さむっ (samu) is what you want to do and what’s that pitch accent there?
Naomi: さむ、上がりますね。(Samu, agarimasu ne.)
Peter: さむっ。(Samu.)
Naomi: そうです。(Sō desu.) でも (demo), please be careful.
Peter: But yeah. Notice how Naomi-sensei used but here.
Naomi: 何?(Nani?)
Peter: でも (demo), you said it without even noticing it which she wanted to change and give you a little piece of warning or advice.
Naomi: そうですね。(Sō desu ne.)
Peter: She started with but. One more time.
Naomi: でも (demo). でも、寒い (demo, samui) is slang. So be careful.
Peter: Yeah. You don’t want to tell your boss unless you are out drinking.
Naomi: Or if you already gave up your career, go ahead and use it.
Peter: If it’s your last day.
Naomi: はい。(Hai.)
Peter: Much like you are doing today.
Naomi: そうそう、そんなことないです。(Sō sō, sonna koto nai desu.)
Peter: Okay. Next we have.
Naomi: ちょうど (chōdo)
Peter: Just right.
Naomi: (slow) ちょうど (chōdo) (natural speed) ちょうど (chōdo)
Peter: Going up.
Naomi: そうです。(Sō desu.)
Peter: ちょうど (chōdo)
Naomi: ううん。(Ūn.) (slow) ちょうど (chōdo) (natural speed) ちょうど (chōdo)
Peter: ちょうど (chōdo)
Naomi: Very good.
Peter: Ah you go up on the う (u) in there.
Naomi: そうです。(Sō desu.)
Peter: ちょうど (chōdo). Next we have
Naomi: いい (ii)
Peter: Good, nice, pleasant.
Naomi: (slow) いい (ii) (natural speed) いい (ii)
Peter: Going down.
Naomi: そうですね。また、(Sō desu ne. Mata,)
Peter: いい (ii)
Naomi: Low at い (i) part.
Peter: Now Naomi-sensei, I always get confused with this – this いいです (ii desu). It can be used to accept something and also turn something down. Is it the pitch accent that is the difference or is it the context?
Naomi: Context.
Peter: So the pitch accent stays the same. It’s the same, いいです (ii desu).
Naomi: いいです。(Ii desu.)
Peter: Going down, いいです (ii desu).
Naomi: はい。(Hai.) No thank you. いいです。(Ii desu.)
Peter: Yeah. いいです。(Ii desu.)
Naomi: You can say that いいです (ii desu). Yeah, そうですね (sō desu ne), same intonation.
Peter: Same intonation.
Naomi: はい。暖かい (Hai. atatakai)
Peter: Warm.
Naomi: (slow) あたたかい (atatakai) (natural speed) 暖かい (atatakai)
Peter: And it starts out low, goes high and comes back down.
Naomi: Again い (i) is low.
Peter: Yeah. あたたかい (atatakai), ah this is – it’s really, really fascinating pitch accent. All right, now again for everyone who wants to practice this, pick up the bonus track. That’s where you can actually practice this and practice that pitch accent.

Lesson focus

Peter: Let’s take a look at the conversation.
Naomi: はい。(Hai.)
Peter: We start off with
Naomi: おはようございます。(Ohayō gozaimasu.)
Peter: Good morning. Next line.
Naomi: おはようございます、冬果さん。(Ohayō gozaimasu, Fuyuka-san.)
Peter: Good morning, Fuyuka.
Naomi: 今日は暑いですね。(Kyō wa atsui desu ne.)
Peter: It’s hot today, isn’t it? Let’s take a look at the components in this sentence. Previously we just had set phrase for good morning. Now we are going to take a look at the sentence structure and the sentence ending particle because this is a particle you are going to hear a lot and we want to get you very familiar with. So this sentence starts out with
Naomi: 今日 (kyō)
Peter: Today.
Naomi: は (wa)
Peter: Marked by the topic marking particle. This is what we are talking about. As the two people came in and the conversation could go any which way, we are going to introduce the topic. So recently I have been telling some people to kind of think of the topic marking particle as a pause. So in English, you walk into the hair salon, morning, morning. So now we are talking about today. Okay, what’s going to happen today? That’s what this does. It establishes what’s going to be talked about. This is followed by
Naomi: 暑い (atsui)
Peter: Hot.
Naomi: です (desu)
Peter: Is.
Naomi: ね (ne)
Peter: Right. So literally today hot is, right? Okay, let’s leave the ね (ne) out for now. We are going to take a look at that sentence ending particle in a minute. Let’s just take a look at the structure. We have a noun followed by we have today 今日 (kyō), followed by
Naomi: は (wa)
Peter: Topic marking particle followed by an adjective. Then followed by
Naomi: です (desu)
Peter: です (desu)
Naomi: Noun は (wa) adjective です (desu).
Peter: And this pattern carries across. This is going to be a basic tool in your Japanese toolbox.
Naomi: はい。(Hai.)
Peter: This something は (wa) adjective です (desu). Okay, now let’s go through some examples here. We went over cool. So if it’s fall and it’s a cool day, we would say
Naomi: 今日は涼しいです。(Kyō wa suzushii desu.)
Peter: Today it’s cool as in the weather. Today it’s cool. How about in the winter time when it’s really cold.
Naomi: 今日は寒いです。(Kyō wa samui desu.)
Peter: Today it’s cold. Now the best thing about this is we said noun. So Peter is a noun and what was that word for cool, かっこいい (kakkoii)?
Naomi: はい、かっこいい。(Hai, kakkoii.) So ピーターさんはかっこいいです (Pītā-san wa kakkoii desu).
Peter: Peter is cool. Now I noticed you had a lot of trouble saying that.
Naomi: popularizing じゃないですよ (ja nai desu yo).
Peter: I actually want to say ナオミ先生はかっこいいです。(Naomi-sensei wa kakkoii desu.)
Naomi: ああ、ありがとうございます。(Ā, arigatō gozaimasu.)
Peter: So again we have the same pattern here, noun followed by は (wa) adjective です (desu).
Naomi: そうですね。(Sō desu ne.)
Peter: So now that you have this は (wa)... です (desu), you can take nouns and adjectives and make lots of different sentences. Okay, we are going to look at a few more in a bit. Now on to this sentence ending particle ね (ne).
Naomi: はい。(Hai.)
Peter: There are a few ways to use this ね (ne). Rather than giving them all to you now, we are just going to go over how it’s used today and what ね (ne) essentially does is add emphasis. It’s an emphasizer. So it’s adding emphasis to the statement and the fact that you are adding emphasis to this statement means that you would like a reaction or response out of the listener. So in that sense, it almost acts like an English tag question. Now the best part about Japanese is this ね (ne) doesn’t change. It’s always ね (ne), but in English the tag question changes depending on the verb. It’s hot, isn’t it? You like pizza, don’t you? So it changes like that. ね (ne) doesn’t change here and that’s one of the great things about Japanese. You get these tag questions that can be formed just by using ね (ne).
Naomi: ね (ne)
Peter: So here it’s hot. Isn’t it? Warranting that response from the listener and the listener responds?
Naomi: そうですね。 (Sō desu ne.)
Peter: Yes that’s right, followed by
Naomi: でも (demo)
Peter: But. That’s what we went over today and Naomi-sensei used it multiple times and she uses it over and over in her explanations when she starts out in Japanese and switches to English. So pay attention to that.
Naomi: ここはとても涼しいですね。 (Koko wa totemo suzushii desu ne.)
Peter: But here it’s very cold, isn’t it right? First we have
Naomi: ここ (koko)
Peter: Here, followed by
Naomi: は (wa)
Peter: Topic marking particle. Now the topics which they were talking about today and when the person responded, now the current speaker yeah it’s hot. Today is hot but. Here now the topic is here. Here
Naomi: ここは (koko wa)
Peter: Very.
Naomi: 涼しい (suzushii)
Peter: Cool.
Naomi: です (desu)
Peter: Is.
Naomi: ね (ne)
Peter: Right. Now we have an adverb and that adverb is とても (totemo).
Naomi: はい。(Hai.)
Peter: So this is modifying adjectives.
Naomi: そうです。とても暑い (Sō desu. totemo atsui)
Peter: Very hot.
Naomi: とても暖かい (totemo atatakai)
Peter: Very warm.
Naomi: とても寒い (totemo samui)
Peter: Very cold.
Naomi: とても涼しい (totemo suzushii)
Peter: Very cool. とてもかっこいいです。(Totemo kakkoii desu.)
Naomi: そうですね。(Sō desu ne.)
Peter: Very cool.
Naomi: はい。(Hai.)
Peter: So this can be used with any adjective and it just gives you another tool to make your Japanese that much more complex. So we can go from just hot to very hot. Gives you a way to modify the adjectives.
Naomi: はい。(Hai.)
Peter: And again we have here ね (ne) but again warranting that response from the listener. So the listener responds with
Naomi: 寒いですか。(Samui desu ka.)
Peter: Is it cold? So literally cold is question cold is. Again the it is inferred.
Naomi: そうですね (sō desu ne) or ここは寒いですか (koko wa samui desu ka).
Peter: Is it cold here?
Naomi: はい。(Hai.)
Peter: Is what is really being conveyed between the speakers but what’s being expressed with words is just this small part because the rest can be inferred that we are still in the same topic. Now is it cold here and this is followed by
Naomi: 寒くないです。(Samukunai desu.)
Peter: It’s not cold. Your first true test as a newbie. Now in Japanese, adjectives are conjugated.
Naomi: そうです。(Sō desu.)
Peter: And it seems intimidating but it’s really not and we are going to get you through this step by step. Again stop by and check out the PDF. Inside the PDF, there is a nice detailed write up but the simplest way to remember this is for i-adjectives, the way to get the negative. Now in English, adjectives aren’t conjugated. It’s the verb that is conjugated. It’s hot or it’s not hot. In Japanese, the adjective is actually conjugated. So let’s take this word. In the previous sentence, we had the adjective cold which is
Naomi: 寒い (samui)
Peter: Now a little disclaimer here. There are a few exceptions to this rule but most adjectives that end in い (i) are i-adjectives. Now the way we conjugate i-adjectives into the negative is we drop the final い (i) and we replace it with
Naomi: くない (kunai)
Peter: It’s that easy. So let’s try it with cold. Cold is
Naomi: 寒い (samui)
Peter: Not cold is
Naomi: 寒くない (samukunai)
Peter: That い (i) becomes
Naomi: くない (kunai)
Peter: That’s it. It’s cold. So let’s try, today it’s cold.
Naomi: 今日は寒いです。(Kyō wa samui desu.)
Peter: Today it’s not cold.
Naomi: 今日は寒くないです。(Kyō wa samukunai desu.)
Peter: The sentence is the same except the い (i) becomes くない (kunai) and that’s how we form the negative. That simple.
Naomi: はい。(Hai.)
Peter: Okay, this is followed by
Naomi: ちょうどいいです。(Chōdo ii desu.)

Outro

Peter: Just right. Okay, so we covered a lot in there today and I think today’s lesson and the PDF is kind of indispensable. So stop by japanesepod101.com and pick up the PDF because you don’t want to – you really want to focus and really want to master the conjugation of adjectives because with these adjectives, you could really do so much. Every adjective you learn, now you could do the negative. So it’s almost like doing the opposite. So stop by, get that PDF. Also in the learning center so much to bring it altogether and finally the bonus. Practice what you heard today, speak it out loud and really help reinforce it. All right, I think that is going to do it for today.
Naomi: さよなら。(Sayonara.)
DIALOGUE
北川 冬果 (Kitagawa Fuyuka) : おはようございます。(Ohayō gozaimasu.)
西本 秋 (Nishimoto Shū) : おはようございます。冬果さん。今日は暑いですね。(Ohayō gozaimasu. Fuyuka-san. Kyō wa atsui desu ne.)
北川 冬果 (Kitagawa Fuyuka) : そうですね。でも、ここはとても涼しいですね。(ハクション!)(Sō desu ne. Demo, koko wa totemo suzushii desu ne. (Hakushon!))
西本 秋 (Nishimoto Shū) : 寒いですか。(Samui desu ka.)
北川 冬果 (Kitagawa Fuyuka) : 寒くないです。ちょうどいいです。(ハクション!ハクション!)(Samukunai desu. Chōdo ii desu. (Hakushon! Hakushon!))

Kanji

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202 Comments

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JapanesePod101.com Verified
September 10th, 2007 at 06:30 PM
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Mina-san, Now you've got some powerful stuff in your Japanese arsenal. You can make positive and negative -i adjectives, establish topics, ask questions, and respond to questions. And now we've interested so weather words. If you check out the audio and PDF in Weather Watch (Lower Intermediate 26), we wrote out a massive list of weather words! https://www.japanesepod101.com/2007/05/31/lower-intermediate-26-weather-watch/ Anyone care to talk about the weather in their hometown? 今日、東京は暑くないです。でも、涼しくないです。雨ではないです。皆さんの町では、どうですか? きょう、とうきょうは あつくないです。 でも、すずしくないです。 あめではないです。みなさんの まちは、どうですか? Kyō, Tōkyō wa atsukunai desu. Demo, suzukunai desu. Ame de wa nai desu.  Mina-san no machi wa, do desu ka?

JapanesePod101.com Verified
November 12th, 2021 at 01:29 PM
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JENUDI WICKRAMASINGHEさん


Thank you so much for your comment😄

Kanji is definitely not easy, but it's fun to learn it at the same time😇

If you're interested in starting, please go to this Introduction to Kanji series👍

https://www.japanesepod101.com/lesson-library/introduction-to-japanese-kanji/


Please let us know if you have any questions :)


Sincerely

りょうま(Ryoma)

Team JapanesePod101.com

JENUDI WICKRAMASINGHE
November 8th, 2021 at 02:49 PM
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Is kanji hard?😅

JapanesePod101.com Verified
September 15th, 2021 at 04:42 PM
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Hi Nuno,


Thank you for your question😊

Yes, we usually refer to someone by his/her occupation, position and so on,

instead of saying "anata," when we don't know his/her name.

If you go to a restaurant and want to talk to the manager, you would call him "tenchō-san" (polite way of saying "manager")

and he would call you "o-kyaku-san" or "o-kyaku-sama" (polite way of saying "customer.")


Please let us know if you have any further question:)


Sincerely,

Miho

Team JapanesePod101.com

Nuno
September 14th, 2021 at 01:55 PM
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One question.


Most of the time we don't know the other person's name.


We shouldn't use "anata wa" or "anata no" because it sounds rude and we don't know their names, then, which option do we have?

JapanesePod101.com Verified
September 4th, 2021 at 05:20 PM
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Hi Gell,


Thank you for your comment!

The adjective "kakkoii" is actually a compound word, with "kakko(u)" (appearance) and "ii" (good).

So it conjugate just like "ii", and its negative form is "kakkoyokunai", not "kakkoikunai."

The negative form "-de wa arimasen" is used just for na-adjective or noun.

For i-adjective, the negative form is "kakkoyokunai desu" or "kakkoyoku arimasen."


Please let us know if you have any further question😊


Sincerely,

Miho

Team JapanesePod101.com

JapanesePod101.com Verified
September 3rd, 2021 at 03:34 PM
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Lamiaさん


Thank you so much for your kind comment😄

Yes, you're correct😉


Please let us know if you have any questions :)


Sincerely

Ryoma

Team JapanesePod101.com

Lamia
August 26th, 2021 at 12:06 AM
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For the pitch accents of i adjectives, i think it starts goes high at the middle and ends low at the い right? Correct me if I am wrong. What a nice lesson and simplification!

Gell
August 16th, 2021 at 01:50 AM
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Hello👋

It is said in this lesson that the negative form of adjective that ends with "-i" is just to change the -i with "kunai", so if I'm going to change 'kakkoii' in negative form is it, "kakkoikunai"? and is the phrase "kakkoi de wa arimasen" also valid as saying 'It's not cool' or not?


Please correct me if I'm wrong😅

ありがとうございます😊😁

JapanesePod101.com Verified
July 6th, 2021 at 03:08 PM
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Mahdiさん

Thank you so much for your comment😄

Other than the use of agreement or confirmation, we also use ね to soften a sentence.

You can study about it here😉

https://www.japanesepod101.com/lesson/particles-13-we-agreewe-have-strong-feelings-about-japanese-particles-ne-yo-wa-ze-and-zo/?lp=128


An1meさん

コメントありがとうございます😄


Please let us know if you have any questions :)


Sincerely

Ryoma

Team JapanesePod101.com

An1me
July 6th, 2021 at 01:31 AM
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Everyone in my class knows the word baka so we say it a lot of some reason and our teacher is always confused on what it means and we just say it means beautiful i don't know why 😅😆