Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Becky: Hi everyone, and welcome back to JapanesePod101.com. This is Lower Beginner, Season 2, Lesson 14 - Visiting the Japanese Doctor. I’m Becky.
Natsuko: こんにちは。 なつこです。
Becky: In this lesson, you’ll learn learn how to describe your symptoms to a doctor in Japanese. The conversation takes place at a hospital.
Natsuko: It's between David and a doctor.
Becky: The speakers are a doctor and a patient, so they’ll be using formal Japanese. Okay, let's listen to the conversation.
DIALOGUE
いしゃ: どうしましたか。
デービッド: けさから、あたまがとてもいたいんです。のどもいたいです。
いしゃ: ねつが、ありますか。
デービッド: はい、37ど5ぶです。
いしゃ: のどをみます。口をあけてください。
(間)
いしゃ: のどがあかいですね。せきがでますか。
デービッド: いえ、でません。はなみずとくしゃみが、すこしでます。
いしゃ: しょくよくは?
デービッド: ありません。
Becky: Listen to the conversation one time slowly.
いしゃ: どうしましたか。
デービッド: けさから、あたまがとてもいたいんです。のどもいたいです。
いしゃ: ねつが、ありますか。
デービッド: はい、37ど5ぶです。
いしゃ: のどをみます。口をあけてください。
(間)
いしゃ: のどがあかいですね。せきがでますか。
デービッド: いえ、でません。はなみずとくしゃみが、すこしでます。
いしゃ: しょくよくは?
デービッド: ありません。
Becky: Listen to the conversation with the English translation
Doctor: What’s the matter?
David: I’ve had a bad headache since this morning. I’ve got a sore throat too.
Doctor: Do you have a fever?
David: Yes, it’s 37.5 Degrees.
Doctor: Let me see your throat. Can you please open your mouth?
(interval)
Doctor: Your throat looks red. Do you have a cough?
David: No, I don’t have a cough. I have a runny nose and am sneezing a little bit.
Doctor: Do you have an appetite?
David: No, I don’t have an appetite.
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Natsuko: Becky, have you ever gone to see a doctor in Japan?
Becky: Sure, several times. I still remember the first time I saw a doctor. I was so nervous because all the medical terms were new to me.
Natsuko: That’s true. But it’s commonplace to go see a doctor, especially when you have a cold. Do you have any tips for people who are new to a Japanese hospital, Becky?
Becky: Me? I thought you were giving the tips! Well... I think the common mistake most people make is visiting a big hospital first. My advice is don’t go to a big hospital without a letter of reference from a local doctor. You’ll have to pay extra if you do.
Natsuko: That’s right. If you feel sick, it’s best to visit a clinic first, then get a letter of reference from the doctor there if you do need to go to a big hospital.
Becky: I think the system is designed to allow big hospitals to focus on patients with more serious conditions.
Natsuko: That’s right.
Becky: In a Japanese town, you’ll often have several clinics near your home, so make sure to visit the right one. My tip for that is, just type “internal medicine” in English on Google maps, or look for the Kanji for internal medicine.
Natsuko: In Japanese, internal medicine is 内科. The first Kanji 内, can also be read “uchi,” and means “inside.”
Becky: Okay, now onto the vocab.
VOCAB LIST
Becky: Let’s take a look at the vocabulary from this lesson. The first word is..
Natsuko: けさ [natural native speed]
Becky: this morning
Natsuko: けさ[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Natsuko: けさ [natural native speed]
Becky: Next we have..
Natsuko: のど [natural native speed]
Becky: throat
Natsuko: のど[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Natsuko: のど [natural native speed]
Becky: Next we have..
Natsuko: あける [natural native speed]
Becky: to open
Natsuko: あける[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Natsuko: あける [natural native speed]
Becky: Next we have..
Natsuko: せき [natural native speed]
Becky: cough
Natsuko: せき[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Natsuko: せき [natural native speed]
Becky: Next we have..
Natsuko: でる [natural native speed]
Becky: to come out
Natsuko: でる[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Natsuko: でる [natural native speed]
Becky: Next we have..
Natsuko: はなみず [natural native speed]
Becky: mucus / snot / runny nose
Natsuko: はなみず[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Natsuko: はなみず [natural native speed]
Becky: Next we have..
Natsuko: くしゃみ [natural native speed]
Becky: sneeze
Natsuko: くしゃみ[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Natsuko: くしゃみ [natural native speed]
Becky: And Last..
Natsuko: しょくよく [natural native speed]
Becky: appetite
Natsuko: しょくよく[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Natsuko: しょくよく [natural native speed]
KEY VOCAB AND PHRASES
Becky: Let's take a closer look at the usage of some of the words and phrases from this lesson. What do we have for this lesson?
Natsuko: どうしましたか
Becky: This means "What's the matter?” or “What's wrong?" It’s a common expression that you’ll hear from a Japanese doctor at the beginning of a medical appointment.
Natsuko: That’s right. どう means “how”, しました is the past-tense of the verb します, meaning “to do.” and it ends with か the question marking particle. So どうしましたか literally means “how did it?” You can just remember this as a set phrase meaning “What’s the matter?”
Becky: It’s not just for use with doctors. You can also use this when you see someone in trouble and want to ask them what's wrong or what happened, like “What’s wrong” in English. Natsuko, can you give us an example using this word?
Natsuko: Sure. When a doctor asks you どうしましたか。
Becky: “What’s wrong?”
Natsuko: if you have a fever, you can say.. ねつがあります。
Becky: “I have a fever." Or you can also use other expressions that we’re going to learn in the grammar to describe your symptoms. Speaking of which, let’s move on to the grammar!

Lesson focus

Becky: In this lesson, you’ll learn how to describe your symptoms to a doctor.
Natsuko: Some of the words might be new and difficult, so make sure to check the words and phrases in the lesson notes after you listen to this lesson.
Becky: There are some patterns you can use for describing your symptoms. What’s the first one?
Natsuko: The first pattern we’ll learn is “がいたいです.” We learned this pattern in a previous lesson, so for a review, が is a subject-marking particle, and いたいです means “to hurt.” You can say a part of your body at the beginning to describe something that hurts.
Becky: For example, how can we say “I have a headache.”
Natsuko: In Japanese, you would literally say “My head hurts.” “Head” is あたま so you can say あたまがいたいです。
Becky: “I have a headache” or literally “My head hurts.” What about “throat”?
Natsuko: When you get a cold, or かぜ in Japanese, you’ll often have a sore throat. ”Throat" in Japanese is のど. In this case you can say, のどがいたいです。
Becky: What if my leg hurts because I have muscle pain?
Natsuko: あし is the word meaning “leg”, or “foot” so you can say.. あしがいたいです。
Becky: Note that in Japanese, there aren’t two separate words for "foot" and "leg". They're both the same word, which is..
Natsuko: あし (ashi).
Becky: So, you have to figure out the meaning from the context when someone uses the word.
Natsuko: Alright, let’s jump to the next pattern. When you have せき
Becky: “a cough”
Natsuko: or, はなみず
Becky: “mucus, snot or a runny nose.”
Natsuko: You need to use the phrase が でます。 
Becky: For example, how can you say “I have a cough.”?
Natsuko: You can say.. せきがでます。でます means “to come out” so it literally means “cough is coming out.” せきがでます。
Becky: Let’s go on to the next pattern. When you have a fever...
Natsuko:...You need to use the phrase が あります, and say, ねつがあります。
Becky: What about if you have a high fever?
Natsuko: That’s 高いねつがあります。
Becky: Okay. Now, we have the last pattern, which is..
Natsuko: んです。We have a good example in the dialogue, so let’s use it. あたまがとてもいたいんです。
Becky: “I have a headache.”
Natsuko: いたいんです。has an extra ん sound between いたい meaning “to hurt” and です. Though they’re technically different, the meaning of both いたいんです and いたいです is actually largely the same.
Becky: So what’s the difference?
Natsuko: Well.. If you simply say いたいです, it sounds like you’re just stating a fact. But by adding んです, you can make it sound like you are explaining the symptom, and aren’t just giving the fact.
Becky: So with a doctor, it might be better to add the extra ん sound, right?
Natsuko: If you want to make it sounds like you’re explaining something about yourself, not just stating a fact, yes. But don’t worry about it too much if you’re not familiar with the phrases yet.

Outro

Becky: Okay, that’s all for this lesson. Thank you for listening, everyone, and we’ll see you next time! Bye!
Natsuko: またねー

17 Comments

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😄 😞 😳 😁 😒 😎 😠 😆 😅 😜 😉 😭 😇 😴 😮 😈 ❤️️ 👍

JapanesePod101.com Verified
April 6th, 2015 at 06:30 PM
Pinned Comment
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In your country, what do you do when you get a cold?

JapanesePod101.com Verified
August 14th, 2020 at 02:06 AM
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Rachel さん

コメントありがとうございます👍

Your sentence is correct!

Please let us know if you have any questions!


Sincerely,

Erica

Team JapanesePod101.com

Rachel
July 27th, 2020 at 12:27 AM
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私は仕事へ行きません。

JapanesePod101.com Verified
June 22nd, 2020 at 06:45 AM
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デービッドさん


and this lesson too😄

https://www.japanesepod101.com/lesson/beginner-lesson-s5-3-new-lesson/?lp=442


Sincerely,

Erica

Team JapanesePod101.com

JapanesePod101.com Verified
June 22nd, 2020 at 06:41 AM
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K さん

はい😄

これからも、べんきょうがんばってください👍


デービッドさん

Maybe it's a bit hard to understand since both are translated as "I have a bad headache.".

but as it's explained in the lesson, んです makes it clearer that the speaker is "trying to explain something"

I think this lesson will help you understand it.

https://www.japanesepod101.com/lesson/beginner-lesson-s5-4-new-lesson/


Thank you for studying with us!


Sincerely,

Erica

Team JapanesePod101.com

デービッド
June 14th, 2020 at 10:37 PM
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Hello,


Great lesson as usual but I don't get the difference you make between "trying to make a point" and "stating a fact" and therefore I don't get the difference between "いたいです" and "いたいんです". You explain that "いたいです" would make it sound as if he was stating a fact...which, to me, is what he does actually... he is stating the fact that his head hurts. He is not expressing an opinion nor telling a fictional story. Can you clarify this point?


Thanks a lot !

K
May 16th, 2020 at 04:31 PM
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Erica さん、

わかりました!

JapanesePod101.com Verified
March 14th, 2020 at 10:53 AM
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K さん

Thank you for your comment!


くすりをのみます。

(When we talk about くすり (liquid/tablet/capsules), we say のむ instead of たべる)


Thank you for studying with us!


Sincerely,

Erica

Team JapanesePod101.com

K
February 15th, 2020 at 07:56 PM
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くすりを たべます。

JapanesePod101.com Verified
October 13th, 2018 at 02:27 AM
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Hi Brian,


Thank you for the comment! I do the same thing! I take Emergen-C when I travel, just in case.


Thank you very much for studying with us!


Sincerely,

Miki H

Team JapanesePod101.com

Brian
August 25th, 2018 at 01:04 PM
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When I have a cold, I usually double-up on Vitamin-C or take some Emergen-C. Otherwise, I usually ride it out, maybe drink some tea with lemon and carry a few cough-drops if it's not a severe cold. I find usually a flu shot helps avoid the big ones and getting rest, exercise and taking vitamins and eating more healthier helps you avoid cold (keep hands clean).