Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Becky: Hi everyone, and welcome back to JapanesePod101.com. This is Lower Beginner, Season 2, Lesson 13 - How Do You Write this Japanese Name? I’m Becky.
Natsuko: こんにちは。 なつこです。
Becky: In this lesson, you’ll learn about how to ask someone to do something politely. The conversation takes place at a school.
Natsuko: It's between David and his teacher.
Becky: The speakers are a student and his teacher. The student will be using formal Japanese and his teacher will be using informal Japanese. Okay, let's listen to the conversation.
DIALOGUE
デービッド: 先生のお名前のかんじをおしえてもらえますか。
先生: いいわよ。でも、なんで?
デービッド: 先生にねんがじょうをだします。
先生: え、ありがとう。「いしい」の「いし」は、stoneよ。
デービッド: あ、すみません、そのかんじがわかりません。ここに書いてもらえますか。
(間)
先生: はい。これで、いしいあずさよ。
デービッド: ありがとうございます。それから、じゅうしょも書いてもらえますか。
Becky: Listen to the conversation one time slowly.
デービッド: 先生のお名前のかんじをおしえてもらえますか。
先生: いいわよ。でも、なんで?
デービッド: 先生にねんがじょうをだします。
先生: え、ありがとう。「いしい」の「いし」は、stoneよ。
デービッド: あ、すみません、そのかんじがわかりません。ここに書いてもらえますか。
(間)
先生: はい。これで、いしいあずさよ。
デービッド: ありがとうございます。それから、じゅうしょも書いてもらえますか。
Becky: Listen to the conversation with the English translation
デービッド: 先生のお名前のかんじをおしえてもらえますか。
David: Can you please tell me your name in kanji?
先生: いいわよ。でも、なんで?
Teacher: Yes, of course. But can I ask you why?
デービッド: 先生にねんがじょうをだします。
David: I’m going to send you a new year’s greeting card.
先生: え、ありがとう。「いしい」の「いし」は、stoneよ。
Teacher: Oh, thank you. The “ishi” of “Ishii” is “stone.”
デービッド: あ、すみません、そのかんじがわかりません。ここに書いてもらえますか。
David: I’m sorry, I don’t know that kanji. Can you please write it down here?
(few seconds later...)
先生: はい。これで、いしいあずさよ。
Teacher: Yes, here you are. This means “Ishii Azusa.”
デービッド: ありがとうございます。それから、じゅうしょも書いてもらえますか。
David: Thank you very much. Can you please write your mailing address too?
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Natsuko: Becky, have you ever received a new year’s greeting cards or ねんがじょう in Japanese?
Becky: Do you mean in Japan? Yes, when I get back from a trip to the U.S. after taking a year-end vacation, I often find my mailbox filled with New year’s greeting cards from my Japanese friends. It seems like it’s a big custom for the New year, right?
Natsuko: Right. There is a strong tradition in Japan of sending new year's postcards to friends or business partners.
Becky: So how can I send New Year’s greeting cards? Can I just go to a post office and buy any card I like?
Natsuko: No, there are actually special cards specifically for new year’s greetings. You can find these in post offices or convenience stores. Of course, there are some people who make their own original cards by printing photos or making designs based on the Chinese zodiac sign for the new year.
Becky: Thats really interesting. I think I’d make my own special card for my friends as well. How do you make your cards, Natsuko?
Natsuko: Well.. I usually make new year’s cards with my family's photo on them. But it seems like I’m getting fewer and fewer cards each year, as younger generations aren’t following this tradition as much as their parents. Instead, they usually send new year's emails.
Becky: I see. Okay, now to the vocab.
VOCAB LIST
Becky: Let’s take a look at the vocabulary from this lesson. The first word is..
Natsuko: おしえる [natural native speed]
Becky: to tell, to teach
Natsuko: おしえる[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Natsuko: おしえる [natural native speed]
Becky: Next we have..
Natsuko: ねんがじょう [natural native speed]
Becky: New Year's greeting postcard
Natsuko: ねんがじょう[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Natsuko: ねんがじょう [natural native speed]
Becky: Next we have..
Natsuko: だす [natural native speed]
Becky: to send
Natsuko: だす[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Natsuko: だす [natural native speed]
Becky: Next we have..
Natsuko: じゅうしょ [natural native speed]
Becky: address, residence
Natsuko: じゅうしょ[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Natsuko: じゅうしょ [natural native speed]
Becky: Next we have..
Natsuko: それから [natural native speed]
Becky: and, and then
Natsuko: それから[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Natsuko: それから [natural native speed]
Becky: Next we have..
Natsuko: わかりません [natural native speed]
Becky: don't understand
Natsuko: わかりません[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Natsuko: わかりません [natural native speed]
Becky: And last..
Natsuko: でも [natural native speed]
Becky: but, however
Natsuko: でも[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Natsuko: でも [natural native speed]
KEY VOCAB AND PHRASES
Becky: Let's take a closer look at the usage of some of the words and phrases from this lesson. The first word is..
Natsuko: なんで?
Becky: This means "Why?” or “What for?" It’s a very casual expression.
Natsuko: That’s right. You can use this in a casual conversation only. You can use it to say "why?” to your friend, but not to your boss.
Becky: In what kind of situation could you use it?
Natsuko: Well, when you hear something unusual, you can say なんで? to ask for the reason behind it. For example, if I ask you out to lunch but you say おひるごはん、いらない。
Becky: (depressed tone) “I don't need lunch.”
Natsuko: I’d ask なんで? to ask you why.
Becky: Okay, what's the next word?
Natsuko: いいわよ
Becky: This is a common, casual way of saying "sure" or "OK"
Natsuko: いいよ (ii yo) has the adjective いい(ii) which means "good" or "fine". It's followed by the sentence ending particle よ (yo). いいよ.
Becky: Female speakers sometimes add an extra particle, right?
Natsuko: Yes. わ(wa) as in いいわよ (ii wa yo). わ(wa) is a particle to soften your statement and used mainly by women.
Becky: Can you give us an example using this word?
Natsuko: Sure. For example, if someone asks you, この本、かしてください。
Becky: “Please lend me this book.”
Natsuko: You could say いいよ。 or いいわよ。
Becky: Meaning “okay” or ”Sure." Okay, now onto the grammar.

Lesson focus

Becky: In this lesson, you will learn useful expressions to ask someone to do something politely.
Natsuko: In the dialogue, we heard the student say - 先生のお名前のかんじをおしえてもらえますか。
Becky: "Can you please tell me your name in kanji?"
Natsuko: It’s a long sentence, but it also contains the key point for this lesson - もらえますか。
Becky: This phrase means something like “could you do something for me” and it makes your requests very polite.
Natsuko: So in this lesson, let’s learn some useful phrases to ask something politely using this keyword - もらえますか。
Becky: Okay. First, Natsuko, could you tell us how to say “Could you write something for me?”
Natsuko: かいてもらえますか。To connect a verb with もらえますか, you need to make the -te form first. かきます is the verb meaning “to write” and its te-form is かいて。
Becky: So if you want to politely ask someone to write something for you, you can say...
Natsuko: かいてもらえますか。
Becky: What about “could you say something for me?”
Natsuko: いいます is the verb meaning “to say.” and the te-form is いって. So you just need to replace かいて meaning “to write” with いって meaning “to say” and add もらえますか。いってもらえますか。
Becky: How would I say “Could you say something for me, once again”? in Japanese?
Natsuko: もういちど is the phrase meaning “once again” so you can say.. もういちど、言ってもらえますか。
Becky: Okay, what about “Could you read something for me?”
Natsuko: よみます is the verb meaning “to read” and its te-form is よんで. All together it becomes, よんでもらえますか。
Becky: “Could you read something for me?” When you’re not sure how to read a Japanese word, you can simply use this phrase. We have one more expression, but actually it’s for all our listeners. How would you say “Could you teach [something] to me?” in Japanese?
Natsuko: Here’s a hint. おしえます。is the verb meaning “to teach”. You have three seconds to give the answer.
(Pause)
Becky: Did you get it? What’s the answer Natsuko?
Natsuko: おしえてもらえますか。おしえて is the te-form of the verb 教えます meaning “to teach” and you can add もらえますか。to make it polite.
Becky: Then how can you say.. “Could you teach me Japanese?”
Natsuko: You can simply add にほんご “Japanese” with the object marking particle を。So 日本語をおしえてもらえますか。
Becky: Listeners, don’t forget to check lesson notes for more useful phrases.

Outro

Becky: Okay, that’s all for this lesson. Thank you for listening, everyone, and we’ll see you next time! Bye!
Natsuko: またねー

11 Comments

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JapanesePod101.com
Monday at 6:30 pm
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Have you ever gotten a card in Japanese?

Katie Pastrick
February 25th, 2017 at 10:32 am
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Hello!


Is "moraemas" a more polite way to say "kudasai," or are they used slightly differently? It sounds like they are both used to make a polite request, so I just want to know if there's a difference or if they are interchangeable. (sorry, I don't know how to do hiragana on my keyboard :'( ).


Thank you!

JapanesePod101.com
March 16th, 2016 at 7:35 am
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Andy san,

こんにちは。

「はい、いつも電気のガスの水道の請求書を貰います」ですね。

:smile:

Yuki  由紀

Team JapanesePod101.com

Andy
March 10th, 2016 at 10:53 pm
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はい、いつも電気のガスの水のビルを貰えます!

Yes, I always get electricity, gas, and water bills!

JapanesePod101.com
April 13th, 2015 at 11:09 am
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デシェヌさん、

こんにちは。

On behalf of 奈津子先生、どういたしまして。

Regarding the question, yes, you are right.

:smile:

Yuki 由紀

Team JapanesePod101.com

デシェヌ
April 9th, 2015 at 10:36 pm
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こんにちは。

奈津子さんの答えはとても役に立ちました。ー Your answer was very helpful.

The verb 書かれた, is it the past form of the passive 書かれる ?

いつもありがとうございます、

デシェヌ

JapanesePod101.com
April 9th, 2015 at 3:27 pm
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デシェヌさん、

こんにちは。

Thank you very much for the clarification!


Actually, in Japanese, 'written in (language)' is very easy. If it's 'letter written in English',

the literal translation would be 英語で書かれた手紙, but you can also say simply 英語の手紙:grin::thumbsup:

東京にすんでいる友達から英語で書かれた手紙をもらいました。

東京にすんでいる友達から英語の手紙をもらいました。


Hope this helps!


Natsuko (奈津子),

Team JapanesePod101.com

デシェヌ
April 7th, 2015 at 10:44 pm
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由紀さん、

こんにちは。

I was trying to answer the question "Have you ever gotten a card in Japanese?" - I understood "in Japanese" as in "written in Japanese". So, what I was trying to say is that "I haven't received a (New Year's) card written in Japanese". I didn't know if the "written in Japanese" is 日本語の- or 日本語で- or something else.

Let's say that I want to say : I have received a letter written in English from a friend living in Tokyo.

I would say : 東京にすんでいる友達から英語…手紙をもらいました。

How to say "written in Japanese"?

よろしくお願いします、

デシェヌ

JapanesePod101.com
April 7th, 2015 at 2:39 pm
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デシェヌさん、

こんにちは。

Do you mean “you haven’t receive Japanese nengajou.”?

出す and 送る have the same meaning, ‘send or mail.’

Therefore, you can use then interchangeably in this case.

Chris san,

Konnichiwa.

Thank you for the kind comment.

If you have any questions, please feel free to ask us.


Yuki 由紀

Team JapanesePod101.com

Chris
April 2nd, 2015 at 5:10 am
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That was incredible! :D

デシェヌ
April 1st, 2015 at 4:21 am
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こんにちは、先生。

日本語の(or で ?) 年賀状をいつももらいませんでした。

Also, in the Expansion of the Vocabulary, there are two verbs meaning "to send", 出す(だす)and 送る(おくる). What is the nuance between these verbs?

年賀状を出す - Would it be ok, I think, but what about 紙を送る ?

いつもありがとうございます、

デシェヌ