Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Naomi: なおみです。
Peter: Peter here. Now, hear this in Japanese. In this lesson, you will learn how to give commands and say "do this" and "don't do this" in Japanese.
Naomi: Right. Such as しろ "do it" or するな "don't do it"
Peter: This conversation takes place at?
Naomi: ツインズというカフェです I
Peter: A cafe called Twins.
Naomi: 彼氏と彼女と、あと小さい女の子が話しています。
Peter: This is a conversation between a couple and a child, so, they will be speaking?
Naomi: カジュアルな日本語
Peter: Informal Japanese.
Naomi: では、聞きましょう。
Peter: Let’s listen to the conversation.
DIALOGUE
下山 新: ふざけるなよー。
: 君、誰?
大空 風歌: ・・・怖いよー。
下山 新: 泣くなよー。
遠井 歩: ね、お嬢ちゃん、お名前は?
大空 風歌: 大空 風歌。・・・3才です。
遠井 歩: ・・・風歌ちゃんのお母さんのお名前は何ですか?
大空 風歌: 大空 美雨です。
遠井 歩: ・・・風歌ちゃんの お父さんは この、おじさんですか?
下山 新: おい!まだ信じていないのか。
: いいかげんにしろ。俺を 信じろよ。
大空 風歌: ・・・ちがいます。
: 風歌の パパは、大空晴夜です。
天道 きり: あら・・・風歌ちゃん、ここに いたの?
: あら?晴夜さん?
: ・・・あら?違う。嫌だ。そっくり!
Naomi: もう一度、お願いします。今度は、ゆっくり、お願いします。
下山 新: ふざけるなよー。
: 君、誰?
大空 風歌: ・・・怖いよー。
下山 新: 泣くなよー。
遠井 歩: ね、お嬢ちゃん、お名前は?
大空 風歌: 大空 風歌。・・・3才です。
遠井 歩: ・・・風歌ちゃんのお母さんのお名前は何ですか?
大空 風歌: 大空 美雨です。
遠井 歩: ・・・風歌ちゃんの お父さんは この、おじさんですか?
下山 新: おい!まだ信じていないのか。
: いいかげんにしろ。俺を 信じろよ。
大空 風歌: ・・・ちがいます。
: 風歌の パパは、大空晴夜です。
天道 きり: あら・・・風歌ちゃん、ここに いたの?
: あら?晴夜さん?
: ・・・あら?違う。嫌だ。そっくり!
Naomi: 今度は、英語が入ります。
下山 新: ふざけるなよー。
Lady: Enough messing around!
: 君、誰?
Lady: Who are you?
大空 風歌: ・・・怖いよー。
Lady: ...I'm scared~
下山 新: 泣くなよー。
Lady: C'mon, don't cry~
遠井 歩: ね、お嬢ちゃん、お名前は?
Lady: Hey, little girl, what's your name?
大空 風歌: 大空 風歌。・・・3才です。
Lady: I'm Fuka Ozora...I'm three years old.
遠井 歩: ・・・風歌ちゃんのお母さんのお名前は何ですか?
Lady: ...And what's your mother's name, Fuka?
大空 風歌: 大空 美雨です。
Lady: Miu Ozora.
遠井 歩: ・・・風歌ちゃんの お父さんは この、おじさんですか?
Lady: ...And is this man your father?
下山 新: おい!まだ信じていないのか。
Lady: Hey! You still don't believe me?!
: いいかげんにしろ。俺を 信じろよ。
Lady: That's enough! Believe me already!
大空 風歌: ・・・ちがいます。
Lady: No, he's not.
: 風歌の パパは、大空晴夜です。
Lady: My daddy is Haruya Ozora.
天道 きり: あら・・・風歌ちゃん、ここに いたの?
Lady: Oh, Fuka...you were over here?
: あら?晴夜さん?
Lady: Oh? Haruya?
: ・・・あら?違う。
Lady: ...Oh, you're not him.
: 嫌だ。そっくり!
Lady: Oops. You look just alike!
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Naomi: ピーターさん。英語の質問いいですか?
Peter: So you have an English question?
Naomi: はい。Yes.
Peter: Ok.
Naomi: Ok? So, do you say おい!in English too? I mean, in Japanese, おい! is mainly used by men and sounds really rough. How about English? Would you say the usage or nuance is the same??
Peter: Hmm... Actually, it sounds kind of a… I hope british listeners don’t get angry but sounds like a bit British English.
Naomi: Hmm.
Peter: おい。I think I have seen it in a movie or a TV program where somebody want to get another person’s attention. So there we said おい。But in American English, we say Hey.
Naomi: Ok.
Peter: But I think nuance is a kind of same. It’s… yeah, not a very friendly greeting. It’s not something like you see at a five star hotel you walked in. おい。 You forgot your bag.
Naomi: Hahah, I see.
Peter: So I think the nuance is kind of similar when you want to get someone’s attention. And it’s kind of used in a very informal situation. Thing going at night or something like that. So I think if you look at the British English, and I suppose I’m right. I think it’s very similar usage here.
Naomi: Hmm.
Peter: Now, Japanese, I often hear this phrase doubled up like おいおい。
Naomi: Ah. The translation varies depending on how it's said and the context but おいおい is like "hey" or "Come on"or "Give me a break". I sometimes use it as a joke though.
Peter: So you are saying you speak pretty rough Japanese?
Naomi: Oh no no no no.... Ah, saying おいおい is Ok for both genders.
Peter: Ok. I have kind of noticed that. (笑) And when it's said twice it's OK for both genders to use right?
Naomi: はい、そうです。But Just saying おいis exclusively used by men.
Peter: So… if you at a station on a train platform, and on the other side, you saw your friend. You would have been like おい!
Naomi: Me? No. (笑) No.
VOCAB LIST
Peter: Let's take a look at the vocabulary for this lesson.
First word:
Naomi: ふざける [natural native speed]
fool around
Naomi: ふざける [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Naomi: ふざける [natural native speed]
Next:
Naomi: お嬢ちゃん [natural native speed]
Peter: young lady
Naomi: お嬢ちゃん [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Naomi: お嬢ちゃん [natural native speed]
Next:
Naomi: おじさん [natural native speed]
Peter: uncle, old man, middle-aged man
Naomi: おじさん [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Naomi: おじさん [natural native speed]
Next:
Naomi: 信じる [natural native speed]
Peter: to believe, to trust
Naomi: 信じる [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Naomi: 信じる [natural native speed]
Next:
Naomi: いいかげんにしろ。 [natural native speed]
Peter: Cut it out! That's enough! Get a life!
Naomi: いいかげんにしろ。 [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Naomi: いいかげんにしろ。 [natural native speed]
:
VOCAB AND PHRASE USAGE
Peter: Let's have a closer look at the usage for some of the words and phrases from this lesson. The first word is?
Naomi: お譲ちゃん
Peter: Now, ojō-san also means "Miss" or "young lady". But here, お嬢ちゃん the affectionate suffix -chan is used, ojō-chan has a friendlier and much younger connotation than ojō-san.
Naomi: そうね。
Peter: These words are used to get the attention of a lady or a girl whose name you don't know. Guess many uses for this. Sample sentence please.
Naomi: お譲ちゃん、何歳ですか?
Peter: How old are you, young lady? In the translation, it becomes "little girl" because Fuka is so young.
Naomi: I'd say お譲ちゃん is used for really young girls. Maybe up to elementary school? On the other hand, you can use お嬢さん as long as that person is a young lady.
Peter: Now, Naomi-sensei?
Naomi: はい。
Peter: Let’s take a look some Japanese cautions. Isn’t it a famous TV personality who is known for calling women in their 50s and 60s お嬢さん.
Naomi: あああ、みのもんたさんね。Yeah. His name is Monta Mino. He's quite famous. And the ladies love to be called お嬢さん. So, as long as you think the person is young, you can use it.
Peter: Or maybe in this way he used it to flatter them.
Naomi: Ah, そうね。
Peter: So suggestion is there much younger than your age by using this word.
Naomi: はい。
Peter: OK. What's the next phrase?
Naomi: いいかげんにしろ!
Peter: Ouch.
Naomi: (笑)
Peter: Again, the context determines the strength of the phrase, but what it would be careful this one. It can be used as quite a strong phrase. It’s among friends can be a funny joking phrase, but in lessons, it’s a very strong phrase. Kind of break it down to the parts. So the first part?
Naomi: いい
Peter: is "good"
Naomi: かげん
Peter this means "degree"
Naomi: and しろ
Peter: ...is the imperative form of the verb suru to do. Now, we'll cover this imperative form in the grammar section in a minute. So,
Naomi: いい加減
Peter: can be translated in many ways depending on the context but it carries the meaning of "moderation", or "not overdo". So,
Naomi: いい加減にする
Peter: literally means "to do something in moderation", "to not go overboard" or "to not overdo".
Naomi: Usually いいかげんにしろ! is translated as "Cut it out!", or "That's enough already!"
Peter: Right.This phrase basically expresses the speaker's irritation toward the situation or the listener.
Naomi: If you want to soften the phrase a little bit, use して or してください instead of しろ
いいかげんにしてください!
Peter: That's enough already!
Naomi: But even if you say it nicely, the message is still the same. So be careful when using it.
Peter: Yeah, I don’t really think we can convey it how strong phrase this convey, and try to think a really good knowledge and kind of concern of mine is if you picture a family of four, a father driving, a mother in the front seat, and two kids in a back. Let’s speak them boys. And you can picture they start a fight back and for a thing, negative warning from their parents, you know. Guys, not get off, then keeps going and also there fulbourn like a fight and a dad turns around and says
Naomi: いいかげんにしろ
Peter: So it’s kind of like better to stop right now! Like not going to get off right now! Again, in part of Japanese are quite strong, so phrases is quite strong. So we just want to convey that to you.

Lesson focus

Peter: In this lesson, you'll learn how to tell someone not to do something in a strong manner.
Naomi: We often see signs saying 「はいるな!」 "Do not enter" or 「さわるな」 "Do not touch", don't we?
Peter: Right. You'll learn how to say these phrases.
Naomi-sensei, how do you say "Do not enter" again?
Naomi: 入るな
Peter: はいる is the dictionary form of the verb "to enter", and な here makes it a negative command, kind of like "don't" in English.
Naomi: うん、そうね。So, はいるな means "Do not enter."
Peter: Listen and repeat. "to enter".
Naomi: はいる
Peter: [pause]"Do not enter."
Naomi: はいるな
Peter: [pause]
OK. Let's do more practice. Naomi-sensei,"to touch" is?
Naomi: さわる
Peter: To that attach?
Naomi: な。さわるな
Peter: Do not touch. OK listeners, listen and repeat."To touch"
Naomi: さわる
Peter: [pause] "Don't touch"
Naomi: さわるな
Peter: [pause] OK.
Naomi: At factories, you'll often see signs that say さわるな、きけん!
Peter: Don't touch. Danger.
Naomi: Oh, I recently saw a similar label on a bottle of 洗剤 - detergent.
Peter: What did it say?
Naomi: Can you guess? Here's a hint. You're not suppose to mix different detergents right?
Peter: Ahhh, I see. Got it. まぜる is "to mix" right?
Naomi: Right.
Peter: So, “Don’t mix” is...まぜるな?
Naomi: Exactly. It says まぜるな、危険。
Peter: Don't mix. Danger. Interesting! And better also says 飲むな。
Naomi: Detergent? Ah yeah, of course not.
Peter: In this case, the Japanese translation would be don’t drink. Or 食べるな Don’t eat. Now, in this audio portion of the lesson we covered only the negative imperative - telling someone NOT to do something. In the lesson notes, you'll find a detailed write up on the imperative form used for telling someone to do something, so make sure to read them.
Naomi: はい。あと、Peterさん、I'd like to point out one thing. Basically, the imperative is a very strong command, so the situations where you can use it are quite limited, aren't they?
Peter: Good point. There are often used in emergency situations, signs from authorities, discipline at home, in the military, cheering at sports events... or situations on the train right before a fight.
Naomi: With the exception of cheering at sports events, the imperative has a nuance of "If you don't obey the instructions, something serious could happen."
Peter: And I'd say it tends to be used more by men than women. So just be careful when using it.
Naomi: はい。
Peter: Alright. That's all for this lesson.
Naomi: じゃ、また。

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