Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Peter: Okay, without further adieu, let’s get in today's lesson, here we go.
Natsuko: おはようローマ。ナツコです。(Ohayō Rōma. Natsuko desu.)
Peter: Peter here and we are back with another episode. Yes. Again today we have a very interesting conversation for you.
Natsuko: Yes.
Peter: Okay, so without further adieu, let’s get into today’s conversation. Here we go.
DIALOGUE
夏子 (Natsuko) : ピーターは英語が得意ですね。明日英語の試験があります。とても心配です!今夜一緒に英語を勉強しませんか。(Pītā wa Eigo ga tokui desu ne. Ashita, Eigo no shiken ga arimasu. Totemo shinpai desu! Kon’ya issho ni Eigo o benkyō shimasen ka.)
ピーター (Pītā) : そうですね。明後日、日本語の試験があります。私もとても心配です。今夜と明日はちょっと忙しいです。(Sō desu ne. Asatte, Nihon-go no shiken ga arimasu.
Watashi mo totemo shinpai desu. Kon’ya to ashita wa chotto isogashii desu.)
夏子 (Natsuko) : じゃ、今夜一緒に英語を勉強します。明日は一緒に日本語を勉強します。どうですか。(Ja, kon’ya issho ni Eigo o benkyō shimasu. Ashita wa issho ni Nihon-go o benkyō shimasu. Dō desu ka.)
ピーター (Pītā) : いいですね。そうします!今夜何時がいいですか。(Ii desu ne. Sō shimasu! Kon’ya nan-ji ga ii desu ka.)
夏子 (Natsuko) : そうですねぇ、今夜七時はどうですか。(Sō desu nee, kon’ya shichi-ji wa dō desu ka.)
ピーター (Pītā) : いいです。(Ii desu.)
Peter: もう一度お願いします。ゆっくりお願いします。(Mō ichi-do onegai shimasu. Yukkuri onegai shimasu.)
夏子 (Natsuko) : ピーターは英語が得意ですね。明日英語の試験があります。とても心配です!今夜一緒に英語を勉強しませんか。(Pītā wa Eigo ga tokui desu ne. Ashita, Eigo no shiken ga arimasu. Totemo shinpai desu! Kon’ya issho ni Eigo o benkyō shimasen ka.)
ピーター (Pītā) : そうですね。明後日、日本語の試験があります。私もとても心配です。今夜と明日はちょっと忙しいです。(Sō desu ne. Asatte, Nihon-go no shiken ga arimasu.
Watashi mo totemo shinpai desu. Kon’ya to ashita wa chotto isogashii desu.)
夏子 (Natsuko) : じゃ、今夜一緒に英語を勉強します。明日は一緒に日本語を勉強します。どうですか。(Ja, kon’ya issho ni Eigo o benkyō shimasu. Ashita wa issho ni Nihon-go o benkyō shimasu. Dō desu ka.)
ピーター (Pītā) : いいですね。そうします!今夜何時がいいですか。(Ii desu ne. Sō shimasu! Kon’ya nan-ji ga ii desu ka.)
夏子 (Natsuko) : そうですねぇ、今夜七時はどうですか。(Sō desu nee, kon’ya shichi-ji wa dō desu ka.)
ピーター (Pītā) : いいです。(Ii desu.)
Peter: Okay, you know the drill. This time Natsuko will give you the Japanese and I will give you the English translation, okay? Here we go.
夏子 (Natsuko) : ピーターは英語が得意ですね。(Pītā wa Eigo ga tokui desu ne.)
NATSUKO: Peter, you are very good at English.
夏子 (Natsuko) : 明日英語の試験があります。(Ashita, Eigo no shiken ga arimasu.)
NATSUKO: Tomorrow, I have an English test.
夏子 (Natsuko) : とても心配です!(Totemo shinpai desu!)
NATSUKO: I’m very worried.
夏子 (Natsuko) : 今夜一緒に英語を勉強しませんか。(Kon’ya issho ni Eigo o benkyō shimasen ka.)
NATSUKO: Tonight, shall we study English together?
ピーター (Pītā) : そうですね。(Sō desu ne.)
PETER: Umm...
ピーター (Pītā) : 明後日、日本語の試験があります。(Asatte, Nihon-go no shiken ga arimasu.)
PETER: I have a Japanese language exam the day after tomorrow.
ピーター (Pītā) : 私もとても心配です。(Watashi mo totemo shinpai desu.)
PETER: I’m also very worried.
ピーター (Pītā) : 今夜と明日はちょっと忙しいです。(Kon’ya to ashita wa chotto isogashii desu.)
PETER: Tonight and tomorrow, I’m a little busy.
夏子 (Natsuko) : じゃ、今夜一緒に英語を勉強します。(Ja, kon’ya issho ni Eigo o benkyō shimasu.)
NATSUKO: Umm, tonight, we’ll study English together.
夏子 (Natsuko) : 明日は一緒に日本語を勉強します。(Ashita wa issho ni Nihon-go o benkyō shimasu.)
NATSUKO: Tomorrow, we’ll study Japanese together.
夏子 (Natsuko) : どうですか。(Dō desu ka.)
NATSUKO: How about that?
ピーター (Pītā) : いいですね。(Ii desu ne.)
PETER: That’s good.
ピーター (Pītā) : そうします!(Sō shimasu!)
PETER: We’ll do that!
ピーター (Pītā) : 今夜何時がいいですか。(Kon’ya nan-ji ga ii desu ka.)
PETER: Tonight, what time is OK?
夏子 (Natsuko) : そうですねぇ、(Sō desu nee,)
NATSUKO: Umm,
夏子 (Natsuko) : 今夜七時はどうですか。(kon’ya shichi-ji wa dō desu ka.)
NATSUKO: How about 7 tonight?
ピーター (Pītā) : いいです。(Ii desu.)
PETER: That’s good.
VOCAB AND PHRASE USAGE
Peter: Okay, wow! Cooperating.
Natsuko: Yes.
Peter: What a change from everyday fighting.
Natsuko: Well, we are friends.
Peter: Wow Natsuko! Your acting is getting better by the day.
Natsuko: Oh my god!
Peter: Okay, so very, very nice conversation and long conversation but again bringing everything that we learned together to date plus a few new things.
Natsuko: Yes.
Peter: So there is a lot in there. So what we want to do is jump right in. So Natsuko, can you give us the first word?
Natsuko: 英語 (Eigo)
Peter: This is
Natsuko: English.
Peter: Break it down.
Natsuko: (slow)英語 (Eigo)
Peter: And one time fast.
Natsuko: 英語 (Eigo)
Peter: Okay, again English. Now we want to focus on the last part of that, right?
Natsuko: Oh yes.
Peter: What is that?
Natsuko: 語 (go)
Peter: And it means
Natsuko: Language.
Peter: Yes, language. It also has some other meanings, but language.
Natsuko: Yes.
Peter: Okay, now what is the other language we talked about in here? What’s your specialty?
Natsuko: 日本語 (Nihon-go)
Peter: Yes, okay.
Natsuko: And I know you all know this word.
Peter: Yes, again what is Japan?
Natsuko: 日本 (Nihon)
Peter: And then we just add
Natsuko: 語 (go)
Peter: To become
Natsuko: Japanese.
Peter: Yes, now we introduced this structure because this is a very common one for lots of languages.
Natsuko: Yes.
Peter: Now Natsuko is going to give you some examples.
Natsuko: Okay.
Peter: What’s the first example we have?
Natsuko: 中国語 (Chūgoku-go)
Peter: Which is
Natsuko: Chinese.
Peter: Okay. What’s the country name?
Natsuko: 中国 (Chūgoku)
Peter: Break it down.
Natsuko: (slow)ちゅうごく (Chūgoku)
Peter: And one time fast.
Natsuko: 中国 (Chūgoku)
Peter: Okay. So we have the country, China.
Natsuko: Yes, 中国 (Chūgoku)
Peter: And then we just add
Natsuko: 語 (go)
Peter: We have
Natsuko: 中国語 (Chūgoku-go)
Peter: Yes, Chinese. See? Let’s give another one.
Natsuko: スペイン語 (Supein-go)
Peter: Which is
Natsuko: Spanish.
Peter: And give us the country inside there.
Natsuko: スペイン (Supein)
Peter: Break it down.
Natsuko: (slow)すぺいん (Supein)
Peter: And one time fast.
Natsuko: スペイン (Supein)
Peter: Okay, one more
Natsuko: イタリア語 (Itaria-go)
Peter: And this is
Natsuko: Italian.
Peter: Yes. And give us the country inside there.
Natsuko: イタリア (Itaria)
Peter: Plus
Natsuko: 語 (go)
Peter: Yep, breakdown Italy.
Natsuko: (slow)いたりあ (Itaria)
Peter: And one time fast.
Natsuko: イタリア (Itaria)
Peter: Okay. Now while this is a common construction, there are also cases where it’s not that way.
Natsuko: Oh yes.
Peter: Okay?
Natsuko: Not the country.
Peter: Not the country. So can you give us an example?
Natsuko: ヒンズー語 (Hinzū-go)
Peter: Which is
Natsuko: Hindi.
Peter: Yes, okay. Can you break this down for us?
Natsuko: (slow)ひんずーご (Hinzū-go)
Peter: And one time fast.
Natsuko: ヒンズー語 (Hinzū-go)
Peter: Okay, so sometimes it works out to be the country plus 語 (go), but there are many cases where it’s not this way.
Natsuko: Yes.
Peter: Okay, next up we have
Natsuko: 得意 (tokui)
Peter: And this is
Natsuko: Very good at something.
Peter: Yes, very good at something or specialty.
Natsuko: Yes.
Peter: Okay, break it down.
Natsuko: (slow)とくい (tokui)
Peter: And one time fast.
Natsuko: 得意 (tokui)
Peter: Okay, Natsuko. あなたは何が得意ですか。(Anata wa nani ga tokui desu ka.) Natsuko, what are you very good at or Natsuko, what is your specialty?
Natsuko: 私は料理が得意です。(Watashi wa ryōri ga tokui desu.)
Peter: I am very good at cooking.
Natsuko: 日本料理が得意です。(Nihon ryōri ga tokui desu.)
Peter: Japanese food is my specialty.
Natsuko: イタリア料理も得意ですよ。(Itaria ryōri mo tokui desu yo.)
Peter: Italian food is also my specialty.
Natsuko: Yes.
Peter: Oh Natsuko, very nice.
Natsuko: I am acting, sorry.
Peter: Well, you are getting very good.
Natsuko: Thank you.
Peter: So your acting is your specialty.
Natsuko: Oh yes, maybe.
Peter: Okay, so what’s the opposite of specialty?
Natsuko: 苦手 (nigate)
Peter: Break it down.
Natsuko: (slow)にがて (nigate)
Peter: And one time fast.
Natsuko: 苦手 (nigate)
Peter: And what does this mean?
Natsuko: Not good at.
Peter: Yes, not good at. So Natsuko. あなたは何が苦手ですか。(Anata wa nani ga nigate desu ka.)
Natsuko: 私は早起きが苦手です。(Watashi wa hayaoki ga nigate desu.)
Peter: もう一度お願いします。ゆっくりお願いします。(Mō ichi-do onegai shimasu. Yukkuri onegai shimasu.)
Natsuko: 私は早起きが苦手です。(Watashi wa hayaoki ga nigate desu.)
Peter: 英語でお願いします。(Eigo de onegai shimasu.)
Natsuko: I am not good at waking up early.
Peter: Me too. I got to remember that. Give it to us one more time.
Natsuko: 私は早起きが苦手です。(Watashi wa hayaoki ga nigate desu.)
Peter: いいですね。(Ii desu ne.)
Natsuko: Yes. My excuse.
Peter: Okay, what’s next, Natsuko?
Natsuko: 試験 (shiken)
Peter: Uhh, what’s this?
Natsuko: Exam.
Peter: Yes, exam, test.
Natsuko: Yes.
Peter: Uhh
Natsuko: Uhh.
Peter: Okay, so can you break it down?
Natsuko: (slow)しけん (shiken)
Peter: And one time fast.
Natsuko: 試験 (shiken)
Peter: Yes. Now in the dialogue what did we have?
Natsuko: 英語の試験 (Eigo no shiken)
Peter: English test or English exam.
Natsuko: Yes.
Peter: Now notice the construction of this phrase. One more time.
Natsuko: 英語の試験 (Eigo no shiken)
Peter: Yes. Something, something の試験 (no shiken) and it makes it that subject’s test.
Natsuko: Yes.
Peter: Okay, what else do we have?
Natsuko: 日本語の試験 (Nihon-go no shiken)
Peter: Japanese language test.
Natsuko: Yes.
Peter: Okay, now we just introduced you to some more words for languages.
Natsuko: Oh yes.
Peter: Now can you make the construction with that?
Natsuko: 中国語の試験 (Chūgoku-go no shiken)
Peter: Chinese language test.
Natsuko: スペイン語の試験 (Supein-go no shiken)
Peter: Spanish language test.
Natsuko: イタリア語の試験 (Itaria-go no shiken)
Peter: Italian test.
Natsuko: Yes.
Peter: Ah brings back memories of high school.
Natsuko: Me too.
Peter: You must have aced all your tests?
Natsuko: No way….
Peter: Come on now, Natsuko. Don’t be modest.
Natsuko: Very gloomy memories.
Peter: Okay. Next up we have.
Natsuko: 心配 (shinpai)
Peter: Okay, and what’s this?
Natsuko: Worry.
Peter: Yes, worry. Break it down.
Natsuko: (slow)しんぱい (shinpai)
Peter: And one time fast.
Natsuko: 心配 (shinpai)
Peter: Okay, now in the dialogue, we had 心配です (shinpai desu), right?
Natsuko: Yes.
Peter: So, worry.
Natsuko: Yes.
Peter: Now we also would like to point out that you can turn this into a verb by adding.
Natsuko: する (suru)
Peter: Yes, which we introduced to you last week.
Natsuko: Yes.
Peter: Okay, so you can say
Natsuko: 心配です (shinpai desu)
Peter: Or
Natsuko: 心配します (shinpai shimasu)
Peter: Okay, now we are going to have some more information up on the website about this to give you the kind of subtle nuance and the differences because I am sure people are going to be scrambling, what’s the difference?
Natsuko: Yes, right.
Peter: Okay, next up we have
Natsuko: 明日 (ashita)
Peter: Okay, and this is
Natsuko: Tomorrow.

Lesson focus

Peter: Yes now, we are going to move into today’s point and today’s point is talking about the future.
Natsuko: Yes.
Peter: Now we gave you a little taste of this by talking about tonight, which is
Natsuko: 今夜 (kon’ya)
Peter: Okay, but now we’d like to talk about tomorrow, which is
Natsuko: 明日 (ashita)
Peter: Break it down.
Natsuko: (slow)あした (ashita)
Peter: And one time fast.
Natsuko: 明日 (ashita)
Peter: Yes again, when you are talking, you are always going to want to talk about the future and the near future.
Natsuko: Uhoo…
Peter: So this is a very important word.
Natsuko: Right.
Peter: Now the reason we are waiting a bit is because this is what we like so much about Japanese. Recently we were introducing you to class 2 and 3 verbs and what tense were we using?
Natsuko: Present polite form.
Peter: Yes, now the best thing about Japanese is the present polite form is also the same as the future.
Natsuko: Yes.
Peter: So we can use this when talking about tomorrow.
Natsuko: Uhoo you can say it the same way.
Peter: Right?
Natsuko: Yes.
Peter: So for example, I will study tomorrow.
Natsuko: 明日勉強します。(Ashita benkyō shimasu.)
Peter: In the dialogue, we were going to do a lot of studying tomorrow.
Natsuko: Yes, oh boy!
Peter: Okay, then we also introduced you to
Natsuko: あさって (asatte)
Peter: Yes, famous movie which is
Natsuko: Day After Tomorrow.
Peter: Yes, The Day After Tomorrow.
Natsuko: Oh did you see that?
Peter: Yes, oh but New York.
Natsuko: Oh!
Peter: Now can you break this word down for us?
Natsuko: (slow)あさって (asatte)
Peter: And one time fast.
Natsuko: あさって (asatte)
Peter: Yes, you want to hold the ‘t’ in there and there is a small つ (tsu).
Natsuko: Yes.
Peter: So give it to us one more time. ゆっくりお願いします。(Yukkuri onegai shimasu.)
Natsuko: (slow)あさって (asatte)
Peter: Yes. Okay, and this is the day after tomorrow.
Natsuko: Yes.
Peter: Now we have one more to really impress the friends.
Natsuko: Yes.
Peter: And your Japanese teachers.
Natsuko: Yes.
Peter: What is our last one?
Natsuko: しあさって (shiasatte)
Peter: Very nice and what is this?
Natsuko: Two days after tomorrow.
Peter: Yes, or the day after the day after tomorrow.
Natsuko: Yes, yes right.
Peter: Yeah, but we would usually say in three days. So again this is a very, very nice one that you could really impress the people with…
Natsuko: Right.
Peter: Because it’s a word but it’s not used so often, right?
Natsuko: Right. You got to hold your fingers and count the days, one day, two day, three days.
Peter: Yes, so today we wanted to give you some practice about speaking about the future.
Natsuko: Uhoo.
Peter: And the near future, tomorrow. The day after tomorrow and the day after the day after tomorrow.
Natsuko: Uhh…
Peter: All very useful things.
Natsuko: Yes.
Peter: Because you often ask your friend, what are you doing tomorrow? So we are going to give you a little example, why しあさって (shiasatte) would be so useful? It’s very tough for the person you are speaking to to come up with excuses for three days in a row.
Natsuko: Right.
Peter: Let’s give you a little example of how it might go. ナツコ、今日一緒に晩ごはんを食べませんか。(Natsuko, kyō issho ni bangohan o tabemasen ka.)
Natsuko: 今日は日本語を勉強します。ちょっと忙しいです。(Kyō wa Nihon-go o benkyō shimasu. Chotto isogashii desu.)
Peter: 明日は?(Ashita wa?)
Natsuko: 明日は英語を勉強します。忙しいです。(Ashita wa Eigo o benkyō shimasu. Isogashii desu.)
Peter: じゃあ、あさっては?(Jā, asatte wa?)
Natsuko: あさっては中国語を勉強します。忙しいですね。(Asatte wa Chūgoku-go o benkyō shimasu. Isogashii desu ne.)
Peter: は?じゃあ、しあさっては?(Ha? Jā, shiasatte wa?)
Natsuko: しあさって… (Shiasatte…)
Peter: しあさって、しあさって、しあさっては?!(Shiasatte, shiasatte, shiasatte wa?!)
Natsuko: あ、オッケーです。(A, okkē desu.)
Peter: Yes.
Natsuko: Congratulations.

Outro

Peter: Yes. So again this can be very, very useful. Okay, I think that’s going to do it for today.
Natsuko: Yes.
Peter: Okay.
Natsuko: じゃあ、また明日ね。(Jā, mata ashita ne.)
Peter: See you tomorrow.

Kanji

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108 Comments

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😄 😞 😳 😁 😒 😎 😠 😆 😅 😜 😉 😭 😇 😴 😮 😈 ❤️️ 👍

JapanesePod101.com Verified
February 6th, 2018 at 03:14 AM
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Hi Savannah Johnston,


Thank you for the comment! I understand your disappointment. But there are many movie titles translated using just Katakana (example: Cars >> カーズ). There must be some marketing reasons behind the decisions.


However, there are movie titles with great Japanese translation. My recent favorite is Frozen (アナと雪の女王). If it was translated as just フローズン, the movie wouldn't have captured Japanese girls' hearts!


Thank you for the interesting topic!


Miki H

Team JapanesePod101.com

Savannah Johnston
November 4th, 2017 at 10:04 AM
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I always wondered if the Japanese title for "The Day After Tomorrow" was a literal translation, i.e. "Asatte". I'm very disappointed… They just katakana-fied the English title! "デイ・アフター・トゥモロー". What's the point of that?!

JapanesePod101.com Verified
September 15th, 2016 at 04:12 PM
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Oscar さん、

こんにちは。:smile:


「誰」より「どなた」の方がていねいです。

'Donata' is politer than 'Dare'.


Natsuko (奈津子),

Team JapanesePod101.com

Oscar
September 5th, 2016 at 03:37 PM
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こんにちは!


「誰」と「どなた」は、何を違いますか。

When I can use 誰 and when I must use どなた? Differences?


ありがとうございます

JapanesePod101.com Verified
January 30th, 2016 at 05:48 PM
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Steph san,

こんにちは。

奈津子先生にかわってどういたしまして。

また、しつもんしてくださいね。


Erindesu san,

Konnichiwa.

Wakarimashita.

I think you wanted to say ‘watashi wa nihongo ga jouzu dewa arimasen.’

That is ok.

If you have any questions, please feel free to ask us.

:smile:

Team JapanesePod101.com

Yuki  由紀

Erindesu
January 30th, 2016 at 04:48 AM
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watashi wa nihongo ga igate hanashimasu demo wakarimasu.


I don't speak japanese very good but I can understand

Steph
January 23rd, 2016 at 09:09 AM
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奈津子さん、

こんいちは。


また、とてもゆうようです。ありがとうございます。


steph

JapanesePod101.com Verified
January 21st, 2016 at 11:10 PM
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Steph さん、


しつもんは だいかんげい ですよ! (Questions are very welcomed!)


First of all, correct sentences are:

にほんごを はなす の が とくいじゃないです。

にほんごを はなす の が にがてです。

The difference is rather nuance or each sentence. For instance, if we say in English

'I am not good at [something]' and 'I am bad at [something]', the basic meanings

are same, right? This Japanese version is also like that.

So, you're right; にがて sounds stronger than negative form of とくい.


As to your next sentence,

にがてな こと は なんです か。

OR

なにを するの が にがて ですか。


If you want to make sentences with にがて as a な adjective in, how about:

にがてな たべもの は さかな です。

= The food I don't really like is fish.

にがてな すうがく で 100てん を とりました。

= I've scored 100 with math which I'm not good at.

オフィス に にがてな ひと が います。

= There's someone I don't deal with well (or don't get along). 

*This にがてなひと means you have negative feelings and/or can't cope well, like

conversation never goes well, but the other person doesn't necessarily feel the same.

A bit advanced usage, perhaps? :grin:


As to あまり, yes, you're right, it has to be coupled with negative ending. :innocent::thumbsup:


Natsuko (奈津子),

Team JapanesePod101.com

Steph
January 19th, 2016 at 05:59 PM
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由紀さん、

こんにちは。


What is the difference between 'にほんごのはなするがとくいじゃないです' and ’にほんごのはなするがにがてです'.?

Does にがて have a stronger feel to it?

Also, is this sentence correct? にがてなものがなにをしますか?- what are you not good at?

I'm struggling to think of sentences to use にがて as a な adjective in.


This is a little off topic but regarding あまり, can it only be used in negative sentences? For example; にほんごがあまりはなせません。


いぱいしつもんは、ごめんなさい。

For all your help, どうもありがとうございます!


Steph

JapanesePod101.com Verified
December 23rd, 2015 at 01:48 PM
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ファブリスさん、

こんにちは。:smile:


下手[へた]

(example)下手な説明。hetana setsumei. (bad explanation)

(meaning)うまくできないこと。また、その人。(unskilled. someone unskilled. e.g. poor explanation)


苦手[にがて]

(example)苦手の国語が好きになった。hetana kokugo ga sukini natta. (I was not good at Japanese but I become like it.)

(meaning)上手でないこと。自信がないこと。(unskilled. not confident.)


下手 is more "objective" and 苦手 is more "subjective.

"私は料理が下手です sounds like you're really a poor cook, and that's an obvious fact, while 私は料理が苦手です sounds like you might be a poor cook but it might be just what you think, it might be you just don't like cooking, which is similar in meaning to 私は料理に自信がありません=I don't have confidence in my cooking.

The use of 得意 is the same as 苦手.

And the use of 上手 is the same as 下手

Therefore, you should not ask others 料理が下手ですか and 料理が上手です か.


Yuki 由紀

Team JapanesePod101.com