Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Natsuko: ナツコです。(Natsuko desu.)
Sachiko: さちこです。(Sachiko desu.)
Peter: Peter here. Beginner lesson #158. Who’s Watching Who? Natsuko-san, Ten Hat!
Natsuko: Hello.
Peter: That’s what we say in, well, actually I don’t know. I’ve never been in the military but Ten Hat is like attention. How would you say that in Japanese?
Natsuko: 気をつけ (ki o tsuke)
Peter: Yes, ma’am. So yes, a little hint about today’s conversation. Now today’s conversation is kind of like a spy vs. spy and the title says a lot about it, who is watching who. Now it’s designed to reinforce the passive. Now we’ve been going over the passive for the past few weeks and I think we are making progress but today is your real test. The conversation is quite long but we use the same words over and over again and just to kind of give you a feel and kind of give you some hints about what we are going to talk about today, let’s give you a few key vocabulary words right now so you don’t get too caught up in trying to realize those and miss the whole point of the conversation. Natsuko-san, what do we have first?
Natsuko: 大尉 (taii)
Sachiko: Captain.
Natsuko: 命令 (meirei)
Sachiko: Order, command.
Natsuko: 敵 (teki)
Sachiko: Enemy. The three words we just introduced should give you a slight hint into what the conversation is going to be about today.
Natsuko: Huh, interesting!
Sachiko: Interesting. So with that said, here we go.
DIALOGUE
兵士1(heishi 1) : 大尉、命令を待っています。(Taii, meirei o matte imasu.)
大尉1(taii 1) : 敵をそのまま見張ってください。(Teki o sono mama mihatte kudasai.)
兵士1(heishi 1) : はい、了解!(Hai, ryōkai!)
兵士2:(heishi 2) ねえ、大尉、敵に見られてますけど。どうします?(Nee, taii, teki ni mirarete masu kedo. Dō shimasu?)
大尉2(taii 2) : じゃあ、見返せば?(Jā, mikaeseba?)
兵士2(heishi 2) : あれ、大尉は見ないんですか。(Are, taii wa minai n desu ka.)
大尉2(taii 2) : ああ、どうしよう。あ、今マージャンで忙しいから。後で。(Ā, dō shiyō. A, ima mājan de isogashii kara. Ato de.)
兵士1(heishi 1) : 大尉!大変です!今敵に見られています!命令を!(Taii! Taihen desu! Ima teki ni mirarete imasu! Meirei o!)
大尉1(taii 1) : ちょっと待って。今見てる方、あるいは見られてる方?(Chotto matte. Ima mite ru hō, aruiwa mirarete ru hō?)
兵士1(heishi 1) : 両方です!(Ryōhō desu!)
大尉1(taii 1) : 両方?どういうこと?(Ryōhō? Dō iu koto?)
兵士1(heishi 1) : 敵を見てるけど、敵に見られてます!(Teki o mite ru kedo, teki ni mirarete masu!)
大尉1(taii 1) : ええと。。。まだわからない。戻って直接説明しろ!(Eeto... Mada wakaranai. Modotte chokusetsu setsumei shiro!)
Take: もう一度お願いします。今度はゆっくりお願いします。(Mō ichi-do onegai shimasu. Kondo wa yukkuri onegai shimasu.)
兵士1(heishi 1) : 大尉、命令を待っています。(Taii, meirei o matte imasu.)
大尉1(taii 1) : 敵をそのまま見張ってください。(Teki o sono mama mihatte kudasai.)
兵士1(heishi 1) : はい、了解!(Hai, ryōkai!)
兵士2:(heishi 2) ねえ、大尉、敵に見られてるけど。どうします?(Nee, taii, teki ni mirarete ru kedo. Dō shimasu?)
大尉2(taii 2) : じゃあ、見返せば?(Jā, mikaeseba?)
兵士2(heishi 2) : あれ、大尉は見ないんですか。(Are, taii wa minai n desu ka.)
大尉2(taii 2) : ああ、どうしよう。あ、今マージャン忙しいから。後で。(Ā, dō shiyō. A, ima mājan isogashii kara. Ato de.)
兵士1(heishi 1) : 大尉!大変です!今敵に見られてます!命令を!(Taii! Taihen desu! Ima teki ni mirarete masu! Meirei o!)
大尉1(taii 1) : ちょっと待って。今見てる方、あるいは見られている方?(Chotto matte. Ima mite ru hō, aruiwa mirarete iru hō?)
兵士1(heishi 1) : 両方です!(Ryōhō desu!)
大尉1(taii 1) : 両方?どういうこと?(Ryōhō? Dō iu koto?)
兵士1(heishi 1) : 敵を見ているけど、敵に見られている!(Teki o mite iru kedo, teki ni mirarete iru!)
大尉1(taii 1) : ええと。。。まだわからない。戻って直接説明しろ!(Eeto... Mada wakaranai. Modotte chokusetsu setsumei shiro!)
Natsuko: 次は、ピーターさんの英語が入ります。(Tsugi wa, Pītā-san no Eigo ga hairimasu.)
兵士1(heishi 1) : 大尉、命令を待っています。(Taii, meirei o matte imasu.)
SOLDIER 1: Captain, awaiting orders.
大尉1(taii 1) : 敵をそのまま見張ってください。(Teki o sono mama mihatte kudasai.)
CAPTAIN 1: Continue to keep an eye on the enemy.
兵士1(heishi 1) : はい、了解!(Hai, ryōkai!)
SOLDIER 1: Yes, understood!
兵士2(heishi 2) : ねえ、大尉、敵に見られてますけど。どうします?(Nee, taii, teki ni mirarete masu kedo. Dō shimasu?)
SOLDIER 2: Captain, we're being watched by the enemy now. What should I do?
大尉2(taii 2) : じゃあ、見返せば?(Jā, mikaeseba?)
CAPTAIN 2: Okay, well... how about looking back at them?
兵士2(heishi 2) : あれ、大尉は見ないんですか。(Are, taii wa minai n desu ka.)
SOLDIER 2: Captain, won't you look?
大尉2(taii 2) : ああ、どうしよう。(Ā, dō shiyō.)
CAPTAIN 2: Ahh, what should I do?
大尉2(taii 2) : あ、今マージャンで忙しいから。後で。(A, ima mājan de isogashii kara. Ato de.)
CAPTAIN 2: I'm busy playing mah-jong. In a minute.
兵士1(heishi 1) : 大尉!大変です!(Taii! Taihen desu!)
SOLDIER 1: Captain! We have an issue!
兵士1(heishi 1) : 今敵に見られています!命令を!(Ima teki ni mirarete imasu! Meirei o!)
SOLDIER 1: The enemy is watching us right now. Awaiting orders!
大尉1(taii 1) : ちょっと待って。今見てる方、あるいは見られてる方?(Chotto matte. Ima mite ru hō, aruiwa mirarete ru hō?)
CAPTAIN 1: Wait a sec. We're watching or being watched?
兵士1(heishi 1) : 両方です!(Ryōhō desu!)
SOLDIER 1: Both!
大尉1(taii 1) : 両方?どういうこと?(Ryōhō? Dō iu koto?)
CAPTAIN 1: Both? What do you mean?
兵士1(heishi 1) : 敵を見てるけど、敵に見られてます!(Teki o mite ru kedo, teki ni mirarete masu!)
SOLDIER 1: We're watching the enemy, but we're being watched by the enemy!
大尉1(taii 1) : ええと。。。まだわからない。(Eeto... Mada wakaranai.)
CAPTAIN 1: Well... I still don't understand.
大尉1(taii 1) : 戻って直接説明しろ! (Modotte chokusetsu setsumei shiro!)
CAPTAIN 1: Return and explain it to me directly!
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Sachiko: ナツコさん、お話についてどう思いましたか。(Natsuko-san, o-hanashi ni tsuite dō omoimashita ka.)
Natsuko: うーん、見てる、見られてる?なんかちょっとややこしいですね。(Ūn, mite ru, mirarete ru? Nanka chotto yayakoshii desu ne.)
Sachiko: It’s very confusing, isn’t it between seeing and being seen. It is, isn’t it?
Peter: Yeah, but more than that, I – what was that word you just gave us, Natsuko-san?
Natsuko: ややこしい (yayakoshii)
Sachiko: Confusing.
Peter: Confusing? Break that down.
Natsuko: (slow) ややこしい (yayakoshii) (natural speed) ややこしい (yayakoshii)
Peter: ややこしい (yayakoshii)
Sachiko: It sounds confusing in itself. You can really feel the confusion in there, ややこしい (yayakoshii).
Peter: ほんとですね。(Honto desu ne.)
Sachiko: Yeah.
Natsuko: Kind of get lost. What’s happening here?
Sachiko: It makes me nervous just saying it ややこしい (yayakoshii).
Peter: ややこしい (yayakoshii), you know it’s so funny. We call this series right now, beginner lesson, but this is a word that, you know, I am just coming in contact with and I’ve been here for years.
Natsuko: Really?
Peter: Yes, I mean…
Sachiko: Wow!
Peter: This is definitely not your average beginner course. Yeah, this is light years beyond that.
Natsuko: Maybe it’s a ややこしい (yayakoshii) course.
Sachiko: Good one.
Peter: Ah Natsuko-san, thank goodness for editors. We will just cut that out and add to the lesson.
Sachiko: Okay, Natsuko-san. Let’s go through the vocabulary once more from the top.
VOCAB LIST
Natsuko: Okay. 大尉 (taii)
Sachiko: Captain.
Natsuko: (slow) たいい (taii) (natural speed) 大尉 (taii)
Peter: Now Natsuko-san,
Natsuko: Yes.
Peter: 大尉 (taii) is captain. What comes below it and what comes above it?
Natsuko: I’ve heard of words like 中尉 (chūi) and 少尉 (shōi) which I believe comes below the level of 大尉 (taii).
Peter: And if they are a captain, maybe... さちこさん、お願いします。(Sachiko-san, onegai shimasu.)
Sachiko: ピーター、お願いします。(Pītā, onegai shimasu.)
Peter: No Sachiko. I gave it to you. さちこ、お願いします。(Sachiko, onegai shimasu.)
Sachiko: Ah I don’t know honestly. ナツコさん、お願いします。(Natsuko-san, onegai shimasu.)
Natsuko: あー…、ピーター、お願いします。(Ā…, Pītā, onegai shimasu.)
Peter: All right. Well two points here. Someone’s name and お願いします (onegai shimasu) can really help deflect the heat from you.
Sachiko: Which is what we’ve been doing.
Peter: Exactly and too, yes we don’t know. We are not up to par on our military terms. So what you have to do is stop by japanesepod101.com. We will make an effort to get this in the post. I am really kind of interested to see what it is, too.
Natsuko: Yeah. I guess there are more – many ranks.
Peter: Yep.
Sachiko: And I am sure they all differ depending on the country and the force you know, but it should be interesting.
Peter: So stop by japanesepod101.com. Next.
Natsuko: 命令 (meirei)
Sachiko: Order, command.
Natsuko: (slow) めいれい (meirei) (natural speed) 命令 (meirei)
Sachiko: Next.
Natsuko: 敵 (teki)
Sachiko: Enemy.
Natsuko: (slow) てき (teki) (natural speed) 敵 (teki)
Sachiko: What’s the next word?
Natsuko: 見張る (miharu)
Sachiko: To watch, to stand guard.
Natsuko: (slow) みはる (miharu) (natural speed) 見張る (miharu)
Peter: Now Natsuko-san, what I like about this word is it’s – you can use this for having someone watch your things. Right?
Natsuko: Yeah.
Peter: Oh thank goodness you said yeah because sometimes in front of airports or maybe that’s not such a really good example but if I need someone to just keep an eye on something for a second, I actually use this verb.
Natsuko: 荷物を見張っててください。(Nimotsu o mihatte te kudasai.)
Peter: Something like can you keep an eye on my bags?
Natsuko: Yes, or maybe you can just say 荷物を見ててください (nimotsu o mite te kudasai).
Peter: So both are okay?
Natsuko: Yes, and I think 見てて (mite te) would be more like you know less warning…
Peter: Yeah.
Natsuko: Maybe a bit more less attention.
Peter: Got it.
Sachiko: So you mean, keep one eye on it and not both eyes.
Natsuko: I like that.
Sachiko: Great. Okay, next.
Natsuko: 了解 (ryōkai)
Sachiko: Comprehension, understanding.
Natsuko: (slow) りょうかい (ryōkai) (natural speed) 了解 (ryōkai)
Sachiko: And now Natsuko-san, in a conversation, would I just use this word as is as a standalone, 了解 (ryōkai)?
Natsuko: Yes, you can use it that way but also if you want to be more polite, you can say 了解しました (ryōkai shimashita).
Sachiko: Ah so that’s the polite way of saying I understand. And what did you stick at the end of it?
Natsuko: しました (shimashita)
(slow) しました (shimashita) (natural speed) しました (shimashita)
Peter: Natsuko-san, I often use the two characters that make up this word when I text messaging.
Natsuko: Yes.
Peter: You know rather than わかりました (wakarimashita) which is わかりました (wakarimashita), six and that’s a lot although well, now-a-days, they kind of pop up quick but anyway that’s not the point. A lot of times if I say, you know I got it, I just put in 了解 (ryōkai).
Natsuko: Right.
Peter: And that’s it.
Natsuko: And as you can see in the conversation, it’s usually the word used in the military in orders like you know when you understand the order. So it’s kind of a formal way to respond to some kind of a message.
Peter: Yeah, so if you can use it well, it can be kind of like a joke. 了解しました。(Ryōkai shimashita.)
Natsuko: Yeah, like that.
Peter: You know, showing that there is a big difference between that of your positions.
Sachiko: Okay, next.
Natsuko: 見返す (mikaesu)
Sachiko: To look back at, to triumph over.
Natsuko: (slow) みかえす (mikaesu) (natural speed) 見返す (mikaesu)
Sachiko: Now can you use that in a sentence for me?
Natsuko: いつか成功して、絶対彼らを見返してやります。(Itsuka seikō shite, zettai kare-ra o mikaeshite yarimasu.)
Sachiko: I am going to succeed and triumph over them some day.
Peter: Nice example.
Sachiko: So it’s sort of used in a positive way, I guess.
Natsuko: Yeah, positive?
Peter: Revenge and spy. I guess it depends on how you look on it.
Natsuko: Yeah.
Sachiko: There is a feeling of revenge but you are telling yourself you are going to conquer it. So it’s kind of a way to motivate yourself.
Natsuko: Right.
Sachiko: For the good or bad.
Peter: ナツコさん、いつか見返してやる。(Natsuko-san, itsuka mikaeshite yaru.)
Natsuko: What did I do?
Peter: That was fun.
Sachiko: Okay. Next.
Natsuko: あるいは (aruiwa)
Sachiko: Or.
Natsuko: (slow) あるいは (aruiwa) (natural speed) あるいは (aruiwa)
Sachiko: So how would you use this in a sentence?
Peter: I rarely hear this in a conversation although I did use it just because I went through all the effort of studying it but nobody really uses it in a conversation well at least I guess on my level.
Natsuko: Yes, very less frequently used.
Sachiko: It’s usually used in written format, isn’t it?
Natsuko: Right.
Sachiko: For example, 電話あるいはファックスでご応募ください。(Denwa aruiwa fakkusu de go-ōbo kudasai.) Please apply for this through either the phone or a fax.
Natsuko: Perfect example.
Peter: Really nice.
Sachiko: Very formal. All right, next word.
Natsuko: 両方 (ryōhō)
Sachiko: Both.
Natsuko: (slow) りょうほう (ryōhō) (natural speed) 両方 (ryōhō)
Sachiko: Now in the simplest sentence, if you wanted both of these items, what would you say?
Natsuko: 両方ください。(Ryōhō kudasai.)
Sachiko: That’s something I think I will probably use at a restaurant considering how much I eat, yeah.
Natsuko: Beef or fish, 両方ください (ryōhō kudasai). Is that available?
Sachiko: I am sure it is. Okay, next word.
Natsuko: 戻る (modoru)
Sachiko: To turn back, to return.
Natsuko: (slow) もどる (modoru) (natural speed) 戻る (modoru)
Sachiko: Now I see this on my remote control. What does that stand for?
Natsuko: Oh, to rewind.
Sachiko: Oh I get it. That makes sense. 戻る (modoru) means return. So it's a rewind. The opposite of that is fast forward, which is 早送り (hayaokuri). Well next time, you get at Japanese electronics, you will know how to figure it out.
Natsuko: Great.
Sachiko: Sure, thanks. All right, next word.
Natsuko: 直接 (chokusetsu)
Sachiko: Direct.
Natsuko: (slow) ちょくせつ (chokusetsu) (natural speed) 直接 (chokusetsu)
Sachiko: Hmm, this is a very useful word. Can you try it in a sentence?
Natsuko: 直接自分で渡してください。(Chokusetsu jibun de watashite kudasai.)
Sachiko: Please hand it directly to him or her by yourself.
Peter: Natsuko-san, what an example!
Natsuko: Umm what is it? What is the thing?
Peter: Do people often ask you to do things for them? Oh yeah, even better what is the thing?
Natsuko: Yeah, what is that thing, I wonder!
Sachiko: Maybe it’s a 義理チョコ (giri choco) or a 本命チョコ (honmei choco).
Peter: いいな。(Ii na.)
Sachiko: Okay, next.
Natsuko: 説明する (setsumei suru)
Sachiko: To explain.
Natsuko: Although this is a verb, it’s originally a noun.
Peter: Yes, it’s one of the ones we attach
Natsuko: する (suru)
Peter: To.
Natsuko: So I think you can imagine but 説明 (setsumei) is an explanation.
Peter: And if that’s an explanation, what do you call the little manuals that come with the book to show how it works?
Natsuko: Not usually a little book but quite a thick one.
Peter: Especially with cell phones now-a-days. Ah but Natsuko-san, give us the word.
Natsuko: 説明書 (setsumeisho)
Peter: With just one additional character added on
Natsuko: 書 (sho)
Peter: Which is the character for
Natsuko: Books and documents.
Peter: Okay Natsuko-san, let’s take a look at today’s conversation because there are some points of interest, something that well, a few things we want to point out. Now in the first exchange between the captain and the subordinate, the subordinate first says I am waiting for orders, the captain answers with

Lesson focus

Natsuko: 敵をそのまま見張ってください。(Teki o sono mama mihatte kudasai.)
Peter: Now this is polite Japanese.
Natsuko: Yes.
Peter: Would people in the army use this?
Natsuko: Umm I’ve never been in an army, but I don’t think so.
Peter: Yeah, this…
Natsuko: It sounds kind of weird.
Peter: It sounds a little bit polite and the reason you point this out is later on, the captain switches to what he probably should be using all along. 命令形 (meireikei), well basically giving orders. And you could see that in the last line when he says, get back here.
Natsuko: 戻って直接説明しろ!(Modotte chokusetsu setsumei shiro!)
Peter: Yeah. Now he is using, kind of, what we would expect in an army. Yes sir, yes ma’am. Okay, one point. Now let’s jump down to the second exchange. This is the other army. We will call them Army B. And they are not using polite Japanese either but you could hear by their tone that they are not really – maybe we call them the volunteer army. They are not really into anything. So but yeah, just again they are using informal Japanese which is again kind of unlikely in between the captain and the people below him but the first line is what we first come across again the passive. Natsuko-san?
Natsuko: ねえ、大尉、敵に見られてるけど。(Nee, taii, teki ni mirarete ru kedo.)
Peter: You nailed the intonation but yes Natsuko-san, what gives it away that this is the passive?
Natsuko: 敵に (teki ni)
Peter: Okay, again it’s the particles that give it away when we are dealing with this. The next line after that is a point of interest, too. さちこさん、お願いします。(Sachiko-san, onegai shimasu.)
Natsuko: じゃあ、みんな見返せば?(Jā, minna mikaeseba?)
Peter: Okay, so literally, huh, everyone if you look back, that’s literally what we have, but we translated this as, how about looking back at them and that’s kind of the nuance that we have in here. What if you did this?
Natsuko: Yes.
Sachiko: Right.
Peter: なになにば (nani nani ba), using this conditional.
Natsuko: Yeah.
Peter: How about doing that yeah?
Sachiko: Like a suggestion sort of.
Peter: Exactly. Thank you, Sachiko-san. Then the next point of interest we have is the third exchange when the serious army, they are kind of in a state of panic because they realize they are being looked at now. So we have some points of interest here. ナツコさん、お願いします。(Natsuko-san, onegai shimasu.)
Natsuko: 大尉!大変です!今敵に見られている!命令を!(Taii! Taihen desu! Ima teki ni mirarete iru! Meirei o!)
Peter: Okay. Natsuko-san, you are – we have to get you back voice acting.
Natsuko: There are so many good ones.
Sachiko: Now it’s convincing.
Peter: Very convincing. You are sure about that army never being good...
Sachiko: I thought so. Maybe you are the boss at home uh!
Peter: Oh!
Natsuko: Uh!
Peter: Now... I like that. Now point of interest here, again we have the same thing, 敵に見られている (teki ni mirarete iru). So again it’s a passive. We are being watched by the enemy. Again we are being watched by the enemy and again it’s that に (ni) that gives it away. Now what follows this 命令を (meirei o) now here, what comes after this? What is inferred? What’s implied?
Natsuko: お願いします (onegai shimasu)
Peter: Yeah, awaiting the order. That’s what we are waiting for like sometimes I guess like if you are in a restaurant or a sushi place or somewhere you can say これを (kore o), meaning I want this.
Natsuko: Yes.
Peter: Or それを (sore o), like – but it’s kind of he is saying it because he is in a rush. It may be – depending on the place, it may be kind of like you will come across to be a bit arrogant but or if you are in a hurry.
Natsuko: Yes.
Peter: It will work out fine. Now the next line, Sachiko-san, is where we are hoping it will all make sense to you. We are really hoping that this one you hear this line and it’s like all of a sudden, the passive makes sense. さちこ、お願いします。(Sachiko, onegai shimasu.)
Sachiko: ちょっと待って。今見てる方、あるいは見られてる方?(Chotto matte. Ima mite ru hō, aruiwa mirarete ru hō?)
Peter: Okay. Now looking 方 (hō), looking side or 見られている方 (mirarete iru hō), being watched side. So there it is, the watching side or the being watched side. It made sense?
Natsuko: Yes.
Sachiko: Literally who is watching who?
Peter: Who is watching who? Now again, this is really kind of an emergency critical speed Japanese. So everything got dropped. Let’s take a look at the sentence with the subjects.
Natsuko: Okay.
Peter: And hopefully it will become even clearer. Natsuko-san,
Natsuko: 今私たちは敵を見ている方、あるいは敵に見られている方?(Ima watashi-tachi wa teki o mite iru hō, aruiwa teki ni mirarete iru hō?)
Peter: Okay. Notice the を (o) in the first part of the sentence 敵を見ている方 (teki o mite iru hō), あるいは (aruiwa) change here to
Natsuko: 敵に (teki ni)
Peter: 見られている方 (mirarete iru hō).

Outro

Peter: Okay, again we are hoping that it makes it all clear. That’s going to do for today.
Natsuko: じゃあ、また明日ね。(Jā, mata ashita ne.)
Sachiko: また明日。(Mata ashita.)

Kanji

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32 Comments

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JapanesePod101.com Verified
March 6th, 2007 at 06:30 PM
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Mina-san, As mentioned in the podcast, here is a link with information about the rankings of the Japanese armed forces: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Military_ranks_and_insignia_of_the_Japan_Self-Defense_Forces And here is a site with comparative rankings of other forces around the world: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Comparative_military_ranks Yoroshiku onegai shimasu!

JapanesePod101.com Verified
August 20th, 2017 at 06:46 PM
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Hello Brian,

Thank you for your kind feedback.Let us know if you have any question.

Cheers,

Sono

Team JapanesePod101.com

Brian
August 16th, 2017 at 11:35 PM
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It's "Who's watching whom," just like it's "by whom." The easy way to remember when to use whom is to replace who & whom with he & him. He's watching him, not he's watching he. He was watched by him, and so forth. Whenever you'd use him, that's where you'd use whom as well.

JapanesePod101.com Verified
April 29th, 2017 at 03:54 PM
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Hi Peter Lloyd,

Thank you for the comment! and sorry for this late reply.


That's right!

"見られています" is a correct sentence and い in the dialogue is omitted.

That often happens in conversation.


Keep studying with JapanesePod101.com

Cheers,

Miki(美希)

Team JapanesePod101.com

Peter Lloyd
December 11th, 2016 at 12:06 AM
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Hi,


The fourth line of dialogue:


「兵士2: ね、大尉、敵に見られてますけど。どうします?」


I am trying to understand the verb construction and would appreciate your guidance.


Miru -> Mirareru (passive) -> Mirarete (te-form) + imasu = "the enemy is looking at us".


In the dialogue the 「い」appears to have been dropped and instead of 「見られています」it is given in the dialogue as 「見られてます」。Is this just an alternative form, or am I misunderstanding the construction?


Thanks



peter

エリック
March 29th, 2016 at 08:47 AM
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由紀さん、


コメントしてくれてありがとうございました!

由紀さんのコメントはすばらしかったです!


Thank you so much for commenting, Yuki!

Your comment was great!


:thumbsup:

JapanesePod101.com Verified
March 28th, 2016 at 04:54 PM
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エリックさん、

こんにちは。

帰る means ‘go back to my original place (in many cases ‘go home’).

戻る means ‘return’ and it doesn’t have to be ‘home.’

Suppose you are a business person and have a meeting at your business counterpart’s office so you have to go there and come back to your office. Then you can say ‘会社に戻る.’

Or suppose you are a graduate and working at a company however, you want to study something at university again. In this case you can say ‘大学に戻る.’


それともis basically used when you want to list up choices in interrogative sentences.

For example, コーヒーにしますか。それとも紅茶にしますか。

あるいはis used when a speaker has various possibilities and choices regarding one topic. It is hardly used in interrogative sentences and command sentences.

For instance, 論文やレポートなどで、図や表がページの上あるいは下に配置されている。

ユニークな造型をする建築家はいくらでもいる。丸、三角、四角、あるいはガラス、コンクリート打ちっ放しなどである。

In these cases それとも can’t be replaced.


I hope it could be helpful.:smile:

Yuki  由紀

Team JapanesePod101.com

エリック
March 24th, 2016 at 09:56 AM
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What is the difference between 帰る and 戻る? When would I use 戻る? Also, What is the difference between あるいは and それとも to mean "or"? Thank you!

JapanesePod101.com Verified
January 25th, 2016 at 06:42 AM
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Chang san

こんにちは。:smile:

Firstly, the wa at the end of konnichiwa must be は because it is a particle.

まま means ‘keep doing.’

Team JapanesePod101.com

Yuki  由紀

Chang
January 14th, 2016 at 12:07 PM
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こんにちわ!

"敵をそのままみはってください"

この句をわかりません。(I don't really understand this phrase.) この”まま”の意味を教えてください。ありがどうございます!

JapanesePod101.com Verified
October 6th, 2013 at 01:31 PM
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ベトナム人san,

basically, 見返せば is a conditional using ば although this sentence was "casual" in the dialog

and the latter part was omitted. It could have been

見返せばいいでしょう or 見返せばどうですか


Natsuko (奈津子),

Team JapanesePod101.com