Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Chigusa: おはよう、水星。ちぐさです。(Ohayō, Suisei. Chigusa desu.)
Yoshi: おはよう、水星。よしです。(Ohayō, Suisei. Yoshi desu.)
Peter: Peter here. Beginner lesson #135. Joined in the studio by Chigusa-san and Yoshi-san, it is great to have you back.
Chigusa: Yeay!
Yoshi: Welcome back!
Peter: Today we will be continuing on with our story about the noisy neighbor. Now today, we have a little surprise in store for the two guys. This is part 4 and the purpose of this lesson is a bit of review. Lots of things we’ve covered over the past months, we are going to put into this lesson. So let’s see how far you got. Okay, with that said, here is today’s conversation.
DIALOGUE
よし (Yoshi) : はい、ちょっと待ってください。誰かな?(Hai, chotto matte kudasai. Dare ka na?)
たけ (Take) : セールスの人だろう。(Sērusu no hito darō.)
よし (Yoshi) : セールスの人?ちょっと覗き窓から見えるかな。(Sērusu no hito? Chotto nozokimado kara mieru ka na.)
(のぞく)(nozoku)
ええ、違うよ。隣の人だ。(Ee, chigau yo. Tonari no hito da.)
たけ (Take) : 隣の人?...出なくていいよ。きっと文句を言いに来たんだ。(Tonari no hito? ...Denakute ii yo. Kitto monku o ii ni kita n da.)
よし (Yoshi) : そうかな?何かくつを持ってるよ。あれ、君のじゃないの?(Sō ka na? Nanka kutsu o motte ru yo. Are, kimi no ja nai no?)
Take: もう一度お願いします。ゆっくりお願いします。(Mō ichi-do onegai shimasu. Yukkuri onegai shimasu.)
よし (Yoshi) : はい、ちょっと待ってください。誰かな?(Hai, chotto matte kudasai. Dare ka na?)
たけ (Take) : セールスの人だろう。(Sērusu no hito darō.)
よし (Yoshi) : セールスの人?ちょっと覗き窓から見えるかな。(Sērusu no hito? Chotto nozokimado kara mieru ka na.)
ええ、違うよ。隣の人だ。(Ee, chigau yo. Tonari no hito da.)
たけ (Take) : 隣の人?...出なくていいよ。きっと文句を言いに来たんだ。(Tonari no hito? ...Denakute ii yo. Kitto monku o ii ni kita n da.)
よし (Yoshi) : そうかな?何かくつを持ってるよ。あれ、君のじゃないの?(Sō ka na? Nanka kutsu o motte ru yo. Are, kimi no ja nai no?)
Take: 次は、ピーターさんの英語が入ります。(Tsugi wa, Pītā-san no Eigo ga hairimasu.)
よし (Yoshi) : はい、ちょっと待ってください。(Hai, chotto matte kudasai.)
YOSHI: Yes, just a moment.
よし (Yoshi) : 誰かな? (Dare ka na?)
YOSHI: I wonder who it could be.
たけ (Take) : セールスの人だろう。(Sērusu no hito darō.)
TAKE: It's probably a sales person.
よし (Yoshi) : セールスの人?ちょっと覗き窓から見えるかな。(Sērusu no hito? Chotto nozokimado kara mieru ka na.)
YOSHI: A sales person? I wonder if I can see who it is through the peephole?
(のぞく)(nozoku)
(Peeping)
よし (Yoshi) : ええ、違うよ。隣の人だ。(Ee, chigau yo. Tonari no hito da.)
YOSHI: Huh, it's not! It's the neighbor.
たけ (Take) : 隣の人?...出なくていいよ。きっと文句を言いに来たんだ。(Tonari no hito? ...Denakute ii yo. Kitto monku o ii ni kita n da.)
TAKE: The neighbor?... You don't have to answer. She must have come to complain.
よし (Yoshi) : そうかな?何かくつを持ってるよ。(Sō ka na? Nanka kutsu o motte ru yo.)
YOSHI: Do you think so? I see her holding shoes.
よし (Yoshi) : あれ、君のじゃないの?(Are, kimi no ja nai no?)
YOSHI: That's odd... aren't those your shoes?
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Peter: Yoshi-san, let’s ask Chigusa-san what she thought of today’s conversation.
Yoshi: ちぐささん、今日の会話はどうでしたか。(Chigusa-san, kyō no kaiwa wa dō deshita ka.)
Chigusa: 隣の人は何をしに来たんでしょうね。(Tonari no hito wa nani o shi ni kita n deshō ne.)
Peter: English please.
Chigusa: What did the neighbor come to your house for?
Peter: I think we should ask you. You are that neighbor, Chigusa-san.
Chigusa: あ、そうか。(A, sō ka.)
Peter: And we will find out next week as next week, we will have part 5. What’s going on with these neighbors? All right, let’s get into today’s vocabulary. Our first word.
VOCAB LIST
Yoshi: 最初のキーワードは、セールス (Saisho no kīwādo wa, sērusu)
Peter: Sales.
Yoshi: (slow) セールス (sērusu) (natural speed) セールス (sērusu)
Peter: And this is taken from the English word, sales. Yoshi-san, can you give us an example?
Yoshi: 彼女はセールスの達人です。(Kanojo wa sērusu no tatsujin desu.)
Peter: She is an expert in sales. One more time, slowly please.
Yoshi: 彼女はセールスの達人です。(Kanojo wa sērusu no tatsujin desu.)
Peter: And Chigusa-san, can you give us one?
Chigusa: 彼はセールストークが上手い。(Kare wa sērusu tōku ga umai.)
Peter: He has a good sales pitch. One more time.
Chigusa: 彼はセールストークが上手い。(Kare wa sērusu tōku ga umai.)
Peter: And what’s that word in there for sales pitch?
Chigusa: セールストーク (sērusu tōku)
Peter: Sales talk. Correct?
Chigusa: Correct.
Peter: Now outside of some businesses when I first came to Japan, I always wondered what this was. There was a sign there and it said セールスお断り (sērusu o-kotowari). What does this mean, Chigusa-san?
Chigusa: No sales allowed.
Peter: Yes, no sales allowed. Can you break that expression now for us?
Chigusa: (slow) せーるすおことわり (sērusu o-kotowari) セールスお断り (sērusu o-kotowari)
Peter: But it doesn’t seem to work too well as the sales people, they are good. They find their way in. Now I just want to take a second here. At our company, we have sales people come sometimes and they are really persistent. Is there a way we can let them know that we are not interested? How do we get them out? Yoshi-san starts talking to them. You are too nice.
Yoshi: 今忙しいので (ima isogashii node) or 今取り込み中なので (ima torikomichū na node).
Peter: I like the first one. Give it to us, one more time.
Yoshi: 今忙しいので。(Ima isogashii node.)
Peter: Yeah, and after that they are always trying to leave their 名刺 (meishi), their business card. Just throw them on the door if they have to.
Chigusa: One more typical phrase is 間に合ってます (ma ni atte masu).
Peter: I remember this one. We had this on the telephone call, the telemarketer.
Chigusa: Yes. It’s the same thing.
Peter: That was huge, Chigusa-san.
Chigusa: Right.
Peter: And you can use this in person also?
Chigusa: Yes.
Peter: 間に合ってます。(Ma ni atte masu.)
Chigusa: はい。(Hai.)
Peter: So let’s have Yoshi swing by and throw them out a few times. Yoshi-san, first sales pitch.
Yoshi: こんにちは、JapanesePod101からきました渡辺と申しますが。(Kon’nichiwa, Japanīzupoddo ichi maru ichi kara kimashita Watanabe to mōshimasu ga.)
Chigusa: 間に合ってますので。(Ma ni atte masu node.)
Peter: I am Yoshi Watanabe from japanesepod101.com and I was – I am tied up now. I am in the middle of something. Can’t get free now. Come on Yoshi, one more time.
Yoshi: こんにちは、JapanesePod101の渡辺と申しますが。(Kon’nichiwa, Japanīzupoddo ichi maru ichi no Watanabe to mōshimasu ga.)
Chigusa: 今忙しいので。(Ima isogashii node.)
Peter: I am a little busy now. So and what’s inferred here is throw the stuff to the door.
Yoshi: She is missing out.
Peter: Okay, next up we have
Chigusa: 覗き (nozoki)
Peter: Peep.
Chigusa: (slow) のぞき (nozoki) (natural speed) 覗き (nozoki)
Peter: And this comes from the verb
Chigusa: 覗く (nozoku)
Peter: To peek as in to look into. Now in the dialogue, we had
Chigusa: 覗き窓 (nozokimado)
Peter: Peep hole. The little peep hole in the door you look out to see who is there. Now recently in Japan, it’s becoming a bit outdated. Obviously not yet but in the future, it probably will be as they move more and more to video. Now when someone comes to your door, you have the little phone – in an apartment building, you have the phone and the screen to see who is there. So what do we call that in Japanese?
Chigusa: ビデオ付インターホン (bideotsuki intāhon)
Peter: In Intercom with video. Okay, can we get an example?
Chigusa: その少年は井戸の中を覗き込んだ。(Sono shōnen wa ido no naka o nozokikonda.)
Peter: That child peaked inside the well. One more time, slowly please.
Chigusa: その少年は井戸の中を覗き込んだ。(Sono shōnen wa ido no naka o nozokikonda.)
Peter: Okay, and next we have. Next vocab word.
Yoshi: 次のキーワードは、文句 (Tsugi no kīwādo wa, monku)
Peter: Complaint, phrase. Break it down.
Yoshi: (slow) もんく (monku) (natural speed) 文句 (monku)
Peter: Now when this word is used with the verb
Yoshi: 言う (iu)
Peter: To complain, that’s what it becomes. For example
Yoshi: 文句を言うな (monku o iu na)
Peter: Don’t complain but it also has another way of being used which is
Yoshi: As a phrase.
Peter: That’s it. Can you give us an example?
Yoshi: 君の口説き文句はひどいな。(Kimi no kudoki monku wa hidoi na.)
Peter: Your pick up lines are terrible. Can you give us the word for pickup lines?
Yoshi: 口説き文句 (kudoki monku)
Peter: 口説き (kudoki), what does this word mean?
Yoshi: It came from the verb, 口説く (kudoku).
Peter: And this is
Yoshi: To hit on.
Peter: We take this and we turn it into a noun.
Yoshi: 口説き (kudoki)
Peter: And then we attach.
Yoshi: 文句 (monku)
Peter: Which here acts as phrase. Hit on phrases. That’s the literal translation. Then we interpret it into English and we get pick up lines. Now I find this word quite interesting because this word is also used in another very interesting phrase. That phrase would be, you got a problem. Now the way that Japanese people express this is, Chigusa-san, get angry.
Chigusa: 文句ある?(Monku aru?)
Peter: Oh pretty scary, Yoshi-san.
Yoshi: ありません。(Arimasen.)
Peter: ありません (arimasen), that’s a good answer. Okay, literally here, “complaint have.” Do you have a complaint? Literal translation and when we interpret it into English, do you have a problem? So it can be used in lots of situations. I have heard it, what are you looking at? Are you staring at something, you got a problem or 文句ある (monku aru) and this phrase has a lot of bite to it. You have to be pretty careful when you use it. Yoshi-san, do you have a good story about this? Come on, you are a guy. You’ve never heard this.
Yoshi: You can see this a lot on TV in dramas or movies like even guys say, 文句あんのか (monku an no ka).
Peter: And that’s the expression 文句ある (monku aru) with のか (no ka), two particles in there. Yeah, I think right before two guys may have a go at it, this is one of the phrases that you will hear. Now Chigusa-san, have you heard or said this phrase?
Chigusa: Yes, I think so.
Peter: Details, details, details.
Chigusa: Umm, once I was really, really hungry and I have like two or three hamburgers for myself and this guy, my friend was staring at me with this really weird look. So I told him, 文句ある (monku aru) and I ate them all.
Peter: That’s a good story.
Yoshi: That’s classic.
Peter: Classic. I remember one time I was sitting in a car with my friend and this guy walked by and I know we happened to be looking at him. So he turned to us and he said, 文句ある (monku aru) and I don’t know at that time what he said. So I asked my friend and that’s how I found out about this phrase, ah! So you got a problem. Now let’s take a look inside this conversation. Let’s get the first line from Yoshi-san.
VOCAB AND PHRASE USAGE
Yoshi: はい、ちょっと待ってください。(Hai, chotto matte kudasai.)
Peter: Very straightforward. Yes, just a second. Then we have
Yoshi: 誰かな?(Dare ka na?)
Peter: Who I wonder, is the literal translation here. Who I wonder. Again we rest around, I wonder who it could be when we interpret it into English. Now かな (ka na), as we’ve stated before, this is used when thinking to oneself. It’s used to reflect upon one’s thoughts or statements. Next we have
Chigusa: セールスの人だろう。(Sērusu no hito darō.)
Peter: Sales person probably, is the literal translation. First we have the sales person. Then here だろう (darō), the informal version, the plain form of でしょう (deshō) and these are two close friends talking. So the speaker uses だろう (darō). Now the reason he would use this here is maybe this area has a high frequency of sales people and it’s based on some information. It’s not a complete guess. So here is what we want to fill in. When someone uses this, there is partial knowledge. For example, he is the visitor. It’s Yoshi’s place. So maybe he was there before and a sales person came by or maybe he knows that his friend always has sales people dropping by. So he is kind of guessing based on some kind of knowledge that it’s a salesperson but he is not completely sure, conjecture that’s what it is here. Then we have
Yoshi: セールスの人?(Sērusu no hito?)
Peter: Salesperson?
Yoshi: ちょっと覗き窓から見えるかな。(Chotto nozokimado kara mieru ka na.)
Peter: I wonder if I can see him through the peephole. Do you think I can see him from the peep hole? He looks, he sees it’s not that person, then we have
Yoshi: ええ、違うよ。(Ee, chigau yo.)
Peter: Hah it’s different and that’s the literal translation but we interpret it as hah it’s not.
Yoshi: 隣の人だ。(Tonari no hito da.)
Peter: It’s the neighbor, followed by
Chigusa: 隣の人?(Tonari no hito?)
Peter: Next door’s person? Again this is interpreted as a neighbor, a person next door but literally next door’s person?
Chigusa: 出なくていいよ。(Denakute ii yo.)
Peter: Don’t go out is good. That’s the literal translation. Now when answering the door, answering the phone, the Japanese use the verb
Yoshi: 出る (deru)
Peter: Which can mean to exit a building, to show up, to appear, all of these but answering phones in doors is like you are showing up. So we use 出る (deru). Here we have the negative form of the verb don’t appear. So let’s interpret this as an answer. It’s a very good way because you answer the phone, answer the door. So when a phone or getting the door is involved, 出る (deru) becomes to answer. Let’s interpret it that way. Then we get the negative form, don’t answer, don’t answer is good. Now again we have to interpret it here. It’s okay not to answer. Remember the construction なくていい (nakute ii), doesn’t have to be done, okay. Said to a listening party, it’s not the speaker. It is an action to be performed by the listener. This is used when speaking to someone and letting them know they don’t have to do something, giving them permission not to do something. For example, Yoshi-san, if we go out eating and I have so much food left and you could see on my face, I don’t want anymore. You can say
Yoshi: 全部食べなくていいよ。(Zenbu tabenakute ii yo.)
Peter: You don’t have to eat everything. It's okay not to, it’s good if you don’t, okay. Again this is reviewed from the previous lesson. Then we go on to
Chigusa: きっと文句を言いに来たんだ。(Kitto monku o ii ni kita n da.)
Peter: きっと (kitto) surely, surely a complaint, say came. Again we have to reverse it around here. Surely she came and the subject here is inferred. It’s the person standing at the door. Surely she came to complain. Yoshi says
Yoshi: そうかな?(Sō ka na?)
Peter: I wonder if that’s right. Do you think so? Is that I wonder literally here but again we interpret. Do you think so? Then we have
Yoshi: なんかくつを持ってるよ。(Nanka kutsu o motte ru yo.)
Peter: First we have なんか (nanka). This is a filler. It has no meaning but he is buying time to think about the situation and assess what’s going on here. He looks out and he sees a person with shoes. He is trying to get his thoughts, what’s going on here? He is trying to put it together. So instead of being silent, this is one of the fillers used. Sometimes you get someone in Japanese to say なんか (nanka), なんか (nanka), over and over. So they have a little trouble getting that thoughts together but perfectly all right, usable in all situations although in business situations and other things, it may make it look like you don’t know what you are talking about, followed by
Yoshi: くつを持ってるよ (kutsu o motte ru yo)
Peter: Again subject is inferred. We are still talking about her. She has shoes, she is holding shoes. Then he says
Yoshi: あれ、(Are,)
Peter: Here this is an interjection to show surprise hah, what! Like he just put two in two together. The shoes are his friends. So it’s an interjection of surprise.
Yoshi: 君のじゃないの?(kimi no ja nai no?)
Peter: 君の (kimi no), what’s missing from here? What’s inferred here?
Yoshi: 君のくつ (kimi no kutsu)
Peter: Okay, the possessive shows that it’s his and we are talking about the shoes. So it’s already inferred but if we put it back in, it’s 君のくつ (kimi no kutsu), then we have the tag question.
Yoshi: じゃないの (ja nai no), じゃないの?(ja nai no?)

Outro

Peter: Hah, aren’t those yours or those are yours, aren’t they? Okay, with that said, that’s going to do for today.
Chigusa: またね。(Mata ne.)
Yoshi: またね。(Mata ne.)

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40 Comments

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😄 😞 😳 😁 😒 😎 😠 😆 😅 😜 😉 😭 😇 😴 😮 😈 ❤️️ 👍

JapanesePod101.com Verified
October 12th, 2006 at 06:30 PM
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Mina-san, Today's location is 水星・すいせい・Suisei - hello to all of our listeners on Mercury! :wink: Yoroshiku onegai shimasu!

JapanesePod101.com Verified
August 13th, 2016 at 04:52 PM
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アリクスさん、

こんにちは。:smile:

‘英語で話せなくてもいいですよ’ means ‘you don’t need to speak (about something) in English.

’英語を話せなくてもいいですよ’ means ‘you don’t need to speak English.’

As you see above, they are a bit different.

Yuki 由紀

JapanesePod101.com

アリクス
August 7th, 2016 at 06:46 AM
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こんいちわ、

In the phrase: 「英語で話せなくてもいいですよ」, why is で used instead of を?

I understand that で marks a location, so why is it used in this instance? Can を be used to equal effect?

よろしくお願いします。

JapanesePod101.com Verified
December 5th, 2015 at 05:43 PM
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エリックさん、

こんにちは。:smile:

Your understanding of てもいい and なくてもいい is good.

‘You may not take a break’ means ‘休んではいけません.’

However, this expression indicates ‘prohibition.’

If you want to say that softly, ‘休まない方が良いです’ can be used, which means ‘I don’t suggest you will have a break. ’

Or if you want to say that euphemistically, ‘もう少しつづけたらどうですか/もう少しがんばったらどうですか’ which means ‘how about continuing a bit more?’

Yuki  由紀

Team JapanesePod101.com

エリック
December 4th, 2015 at 04:24 AM
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てもいい is used to mean that something is alright:


ここで、ビールを飲んでもいいです。

It is alright to drink beer here.


なくてもいい is used to mean that it is alright for something not to be a certain way:


英語が分からなくてもいいですよ。

It is alright to not understand English.


However, how would I say that something is not alright in general?


For example, if someone asked, 「休んでもいいですか」 ("may I take a break?"), and if I wanted to say "You may not take a break," how would I say that in Japanese?


Would that be 「休んでも良くない」?


ありがとうございます。

JapanesePod101.com Verified
January 26th, 2013 at 04:43 PM
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Jacqui-san,

どういたしまして:grin:

Hmm...Singapore...maybe soon to come? :mrgreen:


Natsuko(奈津子),

JapanesePod101.com

Jacqui
January 26th, 2013 at 11:06 AM
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Ah ありがとうございます Natsuko-San.

I always like to know what I am singing :). Wouldn't want to offend anyone by accident :). :wink:

By the way, have we had a shout out to Singapore on any of the podcasts yet ? :grin:

Jacqui.

JapanesePod101.com Verified
January 25th, 2013 at 05:47 PM
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Jacqui-san,

it's actually the perfect translation! :wink:

すばらしいです!:mrgreen:


Natsuko(奈津子),

Team JapanesePod101.com

Jacqui
January 24th, 2013 at 11:36 AM
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今日は、

Another fun lesson thank you. I love the chatting between the hosts during the lesson and am always pleased when I can follow it without the translation.

I have a question regarding the 'it's okay if you don't' construct.

I am listening to a song and it has the sentences :

いつも 忙しい から 心配。そんなに がんばらなくてもいい。

I have translated that as :

I worry because you are always busy. It's okay if you don't always try as hard as that.

Is that a good approximate translation?

ありがとうございます

Jacqui

Natsuko
June 15th, 2012 at 05:49 PM
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グブタさん

You're correct! "mo" gives the choise or "space" (I mean, it's not the order or obligation). So, if you hear 「でなくてもいい」 from someone, it means you don't have to (not you must not).

Hope my answer is what you wanted to know...

グプタ
June 13th, 2012 at 09:51 AM
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Isn't the grammar pattern for "its ok if you dont" 出なくてもいい?


This convo had no mo