Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Natsuko: おはよう、ボゴタ。ナツコです。(Ohayō, Bogota. Natsuko desu.)
Yoshi: おはよう、ボゴタ。ヨシです。(Ohayō, Bogota. Yoshi desu.)
Peter: Peter here. Beginner lesson #120. All right, we are back with part 3 of our sisters sisters, brothers brothers, brothers brothers 2. Natsuko-san, did that make sense to you?
Natsuko: I am lost.
Peter: Last Thursday in lesson 117, we introduced sisters sisters. Two sisters having an informal conversation. We followed that up this week with brothers brothers on Tuesday beginner lesson #118. Now in lesson 120, it’s still brothers brothers but the older brother’s friend is coming by to see him.
Natsuko: Oh, I see.
Peter: Now again extremely informal Japanese and judging by this Japanese, one can tell that they are extremely good friends of the same age and social status. Probably they went to elementary school, junior high and high school together.
Natsuko: I see. Yeah, so they are really close friends.
Peter: Really close friends and that’s why because we are continuing on with imperatives, today we are going to be looking at class 2 and class 3 imperatives. So the fact that they are using imperatives with each other shows that they are extremely good friends. Again when using imperatives, you have to be extremely careful. We don’t recommend you using this imperative because it’s extremely strong unless you have an extremely good grasp of the language. With that said, let’s get into today’s conversation.
DIALOGUE
弟 (otōto) : 来てくれて、ありがとう。お兄ちゃんを助けてあげて。(Kite kurete, arigatō. O-nii-chan o tasukete agete.)
健太 (Kenta) : 誠司!誠司!いるのか?入るよ!やっぱりいた。(Seiji! Seiji! Iru no ka? Hairu yo! Yappari ita.)
誠司 (Seiji) : やあ、どうも健太。(Yā, dōmo Kenta.)
健太 (Kenta) : まったく。まだこの部屋にこもってるのか。1ヶ月も経っているのに。しっかりしろよ!この部屋は汚すぎる。(Mattaku. Mada kono heya ni komotte ru no ka. Ikkagetsu mo tatte iru noni. Shikkari shiro yo! Kono heya wa kitanasugiru.)
誠司 (Seiji) : いやー、まだ気持ちの整理がつかなくて。まだ時間かかるよ。(Iyā, mada kimochi no seiri ga tsukanakute. Mada jikan kakaru yo.)
健太 (Kenta) : ほら、鏡で自分を見ろよ。(Hora, kagami de jibun o miro yo.)
誠司 (Seiji) : 見たくない。(Mitakunai.)
健太 (Kenta) : じゃあ、これでもかぶれ。(Jā, kore demo kabure.)
誠司 (Seiji) : おー、つめて!ありがとう。おかげで目が覚めたよ。よし、彼女を取り戻しに行くぞ。(Ō, tsumete! Arigatō. Okage de me ga sameta yo. Yoshi, kanojo o torimodoshi ni iku zo.)
健太 (Kenta) : 懲りないやつだなー、お前は。(Korinai yatsu da nā, omae wa.)
誠司 (Seiji) : あ、すいません。(A, suimasen.)
Yoshi: もう一度、お願いします。ゆっくり、お願いします。(Mō ichi-do, onegai shimasu. Yukkuri, onegai shimasu.)
弟 (otōto) : 来てくれて、ありがとう。お兄ちゃんを助けてあげて。(Kite kurete, arigatō. O-nii-chan o tasukete agete.)
健太 (Kenta) : 誠司!誠司!いるのか?入るよ!やっぱりいた。(Seiji! Seiji! Iru no ka? Hairu yo! Yappari ita.)
誠司 (Seiji) : やあ、どうも健太。(Yā, dōmo Kenta.)
健太 (Kenta) : まったく。まだこの部屋にこもってるのか。1ヶ月も経っているのに。しっかりしろよ!この部屋は汚すぎる。(Mattaku. Mada kono heya ni komotte ru no ka. Ikkagetsu mo tatte iru noni. Shikkari shiro yo! Kono heya wa kitanasugiru.)
誠司 (Seiji) : いやー、まだ気持ちの整理がつかなくて。まだ時間かかるよ。(Iyā, mada kimochi no seiri ga tsukanakute. Mada jikan kakaru yo.)
健太 (Kenta) : ほら、鏡で自分を見ろよ。(Hora, kagami de jibun o miro yo.)
誠司 (Seiji) : 見たくない。(Mitakunai.)
健太 (Kenta) : じゃあ、これでもかぶれ。(Jā, kore demo kabure.)
誠司 (Seiji) : うわ、つめて!ありがとう。おかげで目が覚めたよ。よし、彼女を取り戻しに行くぞ。(Uwa, tsumete! Arigatō. Okage de me ga sameta yo. Yoshi, kanojo o torimodoshi ni iku zo.)
健太 (Kenta) : 懲りないやつだなー、お前は。(Korinai yatsu da nā, omae wa.)
誠司 (Seiji) : あ、すみません。(A, sumimasen.)
Yoshi: 次は、ピーターさんの英語が入ります。(Tsugi wa, Pītā-san no Eigo ga hairimasu.)
弟 (otōto) : 来てくれて、ありがとう。(Kite kurete, arigatō.)
LITTLE BROTHER: Thanks for coming.
弟 (otōto) : お兄ちゃんを助けてあげて。(O-nii-chan o tasukete agete.)
LITTLE BROTHER: Please help my big brother.
健太 (Kenta) : 誠司!誠司!いるのか?入るよ!(Seiji! Seiji! Iru no ka? Hairu yo!)
KENTA: Seiji! Seiji! You there? I'm coming in!
健太 (Kenta) : やっぱりいた。(Yappari ita.)
KENTA: So you are here!
誠司 (Seiji) : やあ、どうも健太。(Yā, dōmo Kenta.)
SEIJI: Hey, how's it going Kenta.
健太 (Kenta) : まったく。まだこの部屋にこもってるのか。1ヶ月も経っているのに。(Mattaku. Mada kono heya ni komotte ru no ka. Ikkagetsu mo tatte iru noni.)
KENTA: Unbelievable. You're still holed up in this room? It's already been a month.
健太 (Kenta) : しっかりしろよ!この部屋は汚すぎる。(Shikkari shiro yo! Kono heya wa kitanasugiru.)
KENTA: Pull yourself together! This room is too messy.
誠司 (Seiji) : いやー、まだ気持ちの整理がつかなくて。まだ時間かかるよ。(Iyā, mada kimochi no seiri ga tsukanakute. Mada jikan kakaru yo.)
SEIJI: Well, I haven't been able to sort things out yet. It'll take more time.
健太 (Kenta) : ほら、鏡で自分を見ろよ。(Hora, kagami de jibun o miro yo.)
KENTA: Hey, look at yourself in the mirror.
誠司 (Seiji) : 見たくない。(Mitakunai.)
SEIJI: I don't want to.
健太 (Kenta) : じゃあ、これでもかぶれ。(Jā, kore demo kabure.)
KENTA: Then take this.
誠司 (Seiji) : おー、つめて!(Ō, tsumete!)
SEIJI: Ahh, it's cold!
誠司 (Seiji) : ありがとう。おかげで目が覚めたよ。よし、彼女を取り戻しに行くぞ。(Arigatō. Okage de me ga sameta yo. Yoshi, kanojo o torimodoshi ni iku zo.)
SEIJI: Thanks. It woke me up. Alright, I'm going to get her back.
健太 (Kenta) : 懲りないやつだなー、お前は。(Korinai yatsu da nā, omae wa.)
KENTA: You just never learn, do you?
誠司 (Seiji) : あ、すいません。(A, suimasen.)
SEIJI: Oh, sorry.
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Peter: Yoshi-san, let’s ask Natsuko-san what she thought of today’s conversation.
Yoshi: ナツコさん、今日の会話はどうでしたか。(Natsuko-san, kyō no kaiwa wa dō deshita ka.)
Natsuko: いい友達がいてうらやましいですね。(Ii tomodachi ga ite urayamashii desu ne.)
Peter: English, please.
Natsuko: It’s good to have such a good friend.
Peter: Yeah, that is nice but then vice versa, the good friend, it’s not good that you have such a bad friend, such a troublesome friend. He wanted to go back to her. Natsuko-san, what do you think about that?
Natsuko: Well, personally it’s unbelievable to be locked up in a room for one month just because of a girl.
Peter: I think one month on the conservative side.
Natsuko: Oh really?
Peter: Yeah, well Yoshi-san, any input here?
Yoshi: Well you know, this whole conversation is kind of sad.
Natsuko: Sad, yeah.
Yoshi: Because like the girl wasn’t really dating another guy but he didn’t know and he got locked up in the room for a month.
Peter: That’s the best part of the story.
Natsuko: That is what…You know, he didn’t even check up.
Peter: Right, he should have followed up.
Natsuko: Yeah.
Peter: So he deserved what he got.
Yoshi: He had all the hiding and the water and everything.
Peter: So you think the writers went a little too right on him. Well, with that said, there is really good content in this lesson.
VOCAB AND PHRASE USAGE
Peter: So what we are going to do here is go through the vocab once and then we are going to take apart the dialogue. Natsuko-san, first word, please.
Natsuko: 助ける (tasukeru)
Peter: To help.
Natsuko: (slow)たすける (tasukeru) (natural speed) 助ける (tasukeru)
Peter: And this is transitive. Intransitive version is
Natsuko: 助かる (tasukaru)
Peter: Next we have
Yoshi: こもる (komoru)
Peter: Stay locked up in.
Yoshi: (slow)こもる (komoru) (natural speed) こもる (komoru)
Peter: Can we get an example sentence here?
Yoshi: 自分の殻にこもる。(Jibun no kara ni komoru.)
Peter: To stay locked up in one’s shell. To hide in one’s shell. In Japanese, this is often found in a sentence involving a room, where someone stays in their room for a long period of time. Natsuko-san, can you give us an example?
Natsuko: Yeah, we hear a lot of 引きこもり (hikikomori) here, right?
Peter: Exactly. Can you tell everyone what that is?
Natsuko: It’s mostly about young people staying locked up in a room and doesn’t want to communicate with anybody.
Peter: They make a month look like child’s play.
Natsuko: Yeah.
Peter: Months of deadlock, maybe even years in some people’s cases.
Natsuko: Yeah, and I hear that many of them do communicate online but not in person.
Peter: Yeah. Groceries delivered and yeah, just in their room.
Natsuko: Yes.
Peter: Doesn’t sound too bad.
Natsuko: Oh really? ピーター、引きこもり?(Pītā, hikikomori?)
Peter: したいですね。(Shitai desu ne.)
Yoshi: どうぞ。(Dōzo.)
Peter: Yoshi, stop it, just stop it.
Yoshi: えー、私たちはいつも、スタジオにこもっていますね。(Ē, watashi-tachi wa itsumo, sutajio ni komotte masu ne.)
Peter: Yep, we are always locked up in the studio.
Natsuko: そうですね。(Sō desu ne.)
Peter: Natsuko, you are always free. You are a celebrity. You just stop by once in a while.
Natsuko: I am sorry.
Peter: ずるい。(Zurui.)
Natsuko: そんなことないよ。(Sonna koto nai yo.)
Peter: Get into that sentence. Okay, give us the next one.
Natsuko: しっかり (shikkari)
Peter: Take care too. Now this is a great word. Natsuko-san, do you know why I love this word so much?
Natsuko: Why?
Peter: Because this is the word in every action seen when someone goes down. The hero grabs them and they say
Natsuko: しっかりしろ!(Shikkari shiro!)
Peter: That’s why. It took me forever to figure out what they were saying but now that I got it, I just love that word so much.
Natsuko: (slow)しっかり (shikkari) (natural speed) しっかり (shikkari)
Peter: And how do we turn this into a verb?
Natsuko: しっかりする (shikkari suru)
Peter: Attach する (suru), again this is a する (suru) verb. Next we have
Yoshi: 汚い (kitanai)
Peter: Dirty.
Yoshi: (slow)きたない (kitanai) (natural speed) 汚い (kitanai)
Peter: Next we have
Natsuko: 懲りる (koriru)
Peter: To learn a lesson.
Natsuko: (slow)こりる (koriru) (natural speed) 懲りる (koriru)
Peter: And what do we have in today’s dialogue?
Natsuko: 懲りない (korinai)
Peter: Never learn. Sounds like somebody in the studio here.
Natsuko: Yes.
Peter: よしさん?(Yoshi-san?)
Yoshi: Talking about yourself.
Peter: Yoshi-san, talking about Yoshi-san.
Yoshi: Talking about yourself, Peter?
Peter: Offending people. You are a street man two days in a row.
Yoshi: All right.
Natsuko: Hey, hey, hey, hey! しっかりしなさい、二人とも。(Shikkari shinasai, futari-tomo.)
Yoshi: はい。(Hai.)
Peter: Yes. はい。(Hai.) Thank you very much, Natsuko. Feel free to smack, Yoshi.
Natsuko: はい。はいはいはい。(Hai. Hai hai hai.)
Peter: Yes, umm never learn. We never learn. You know, I have been here a long time and I never heard this especially with my personality. You think I would run into this word.
Natsuko: Yes.
Yoshi: Finally.
Natsuko: Finally.
Peter: Excellent, excellent vocabulary word. Can you give us an example sentence?
Yoshi: その子供は何度しかっても懲りない。(Sono kodomo wa nan-do shikatte mo korinai.)
Peter: No matter how many times you yell at that child, he doesn’t learn. ヨシさん、懐かしいですか。(Yoshi-san, natsukashii desu ka.)
Yoshi: うーん。(Ūn.) Not so much.
Peter: Okay, final vocab word.
Yoshi: やつ (yatsu)
Peter: Guy.
Yoshi: (slow)やつ (yatsu) (natural speed) やつ (yatsu)
Peter: Usually refers to a guy but sometimes it can refer to things. Now Natsuko-san, when we use this word, does it have a positive meaning or a bit negative? What kind of meaning or are there any implications when using this word?
Natsuko: Umm, I think it’s usually used by men and it has a bit of a strong nuance.
Peter: Yeah. So it’s not polite by any means.
Natsuko: Usually ,yes.
Peter: So kind of a casual word.
Natsuko: So usually used among friends in a very casual situation.
Peter: Yeah, not for business meetings or not to refer to some guy.
Natsuko: Yes. So when talking about someone, it must be a pretty close relationship.
Peter: Exactly.

Lesson focus

Peter: Let’s take a look at some of the key points in today’s conversation. Yoshi-san, give us the first line, the little brother.
Yoshi: 来てくれて、ありがとう。(Kite kurete, arigatō.)
Peter: Stop right there. Now this てくれて、ありがとう (te kurete, arigatō). This is a really popular construction. It’s polite but a bit on the casual side and you will use it over and over with friends.
Natsuko: Yes.
Peter: For example, Yoshi-san, thank you for paying for lunch.
Yoshi: おごってくれて、ありがとう。(Ogotte kurete, arigatō.)
Peter: Natsuko-san, thank you for the ride to the station.
Natsuko: 駅まで送ってくれて、ありがとう。(Eki made okutte kurete, arigatō.)
Peter: Really useful construction. If you can throw this together, you can just change the verb, put it in its te-form and attach it to くれてありがとう (kurete arigatō) and you are in really good shape.
Natsuko: Right.
Peter: This is followed by
Yoshi: お兄ちゃんを助けてあげて。(O-nii-chan o tasukete agete.)
Peter: Here is the young child talking to someone with a higher social status but in this case, it’s usually all right one, because it is a child. Two, as it’s his older brother’s best friend, it’s apparent they have met before. So he can also speak a bit more casually as he becomes more intimate.
Yoshi: Right.
Peter: What did the young boy leave off here?
Yoshi: ください (kudasai)
Peter: So in the formal track which you can find at japanesepod101.com, he says
Yoshi: お兄ちゃんを助けてあげてください。(O-nii-chan o tasukete agete kudasai.)
Peter: Perfect. Next line we have
Natsuko: 誠司。誠司。(Seiji. Seiji.)
Peter: His older brother’s name is Seiji. So the friend is calling Seiji.
Natsuko: いるのか?(Iru no ka?)
Peter: Here we have an interrogative. In the past, we left off the particle
Natsuko: か (ka)
Peter: And we had
Natsuko: いるの (iru no)
Peter: Questions that ended with the particle
Natsuko: の (no)
Peter: And with the according intonation. Here this speaker prefers
Natsuko: いるのか (iru no ka)
Peter: To add the particle. So is there anything to this construction?
Natsuko: いるのか (iru no ka) is usually used by male and women doesn’t usually use this expression.
Peter: Very important point. Then it’s followed by
Natsuko: 入るよ。(Hairu yo.)
Peter: So here he is doing something without permission. Doing something on his own. He had no response. So he is letting the person know and emphasizing it with the ending particle
Natsuko: よ (yo)
Peter: Okay. Then he goes into the room and they give each other some greetings. Then we see this construction again, the のか (no ka) in the fourth line of the dialogue. When Kenta, the friend’s name, asks Seiji, has he been in this room all this time? Natsuko-san, one more time.
Natsuko: まだ、この部屋にこもってるのか。(Mada, kono heya ni komotte ru no ka.)
Peter: Again the key point, the ending のか (no ka). This is followed by
Natsuko: 一ヶ月も経っているのに。(Ikkagetsu mo tatte iru noni.)
Peter: Even though it’s been a month already, let’s take a look at the end of this sentence. What’s there, Natsuko-san?
Natsuko: のに (noni)
Peter: Roughly, even though.
Natsuko: Yes.
Peter: Kind of emphasizing the fact that something didn’t work out.
Natsuko: Uhoo..
Peter: Now Natsuko-san, what verb do we use with the passage of time?
Natsuko: 経つ (tatsu)
Peter: Break it down.
Natsuko: (slow)たつ (tatsu) (natural speed) 経つ (tatsu)
Peter: The particle here we use between the measurement of time and the verb is も (mo). Why do we use も (mo) here?
Natsuko: Emphasizing how long the time was spent.
Peter: Now with this grammatical construction, we don’t use the object marker を (o), right?
Natsuko: No.
Peter: The subject, the time measurement usually takes a marking particle.
Natsuko: Uhoo…
Peter: は (wa), が (ga) or も (mo).
Natsuko: Yes.
Peter: Then we have my favorite expression
Natsuko: しっかりしろよ。(Shikkari shiro yo.)
Peter: Pull yourself together, and here we have する (suru), class 3 verb in the imperative form. Natsuko-san, can you finish off what he said?
Natsuko: この部屋は汚すぎる。(Kono heya wa kitanasugiru.)
Peter: Then he responds with
Yoshi: いやー、まだ気持ちの整理がつかなくて。(Iyā, mada kimochi no seiri ga tsukanakute.)
Peter: I still haven’t come to grips with my feelings. The new vocab word here is
Natsuko: 整理 (seiri)
Peter: Sort, organize. One time fast.
Natsuko: 整理 (seiri)
Peter: And notice how this sentence ends in the te-form
Yoshi: つかなくて (tsukanakute)
Peter: Followed by
Yoshi: まだ、時間かかるよ。(Mada, jikan kakaru yo.)
Peter: To this Kenta response.
Natsuko: ほら、鏡で自分を見ろよ。(Hora, kagami de jibun o miro yo.)
Peter: Here, look at yourself in a mirror. Here we have a class 2 verb in the imperative form. Okay, let’s just finish off this conversation.
Yoshi: 見たくない。(Mitakunai.)
Peter: I don’t want to see it.
Natsuko: じゃあ、これでも被れ。(Jā, kore demo kabure.)
Peter: Here we have the imperative to wear something on one’s head. Next line.
Yoshi: おー、つめて。(Ō, tsumete.)
Peter: Here we actually have the adjective for cold and cold as in cold to the senses, not the weather outside. That would be 寒い (samui). Here we have a cold to the senses. The adjective is actually
Yoshi: 冷たい (tsumetai)
Peter: But when male speakers speak in casual conversations, when you have the あ (a) and the い (i) together, they get contracted into
Yoshi: え (e)
Peter: For example, if we have た (ta) and い (i), たい (tai). Natsuko-san, please give it to us.
Natsuko: たい (tai)
Peter: When male speakers speak informally, it sometimes gets contracted into
Yoshi: て (te)
Peter: And this has nothing to do with the te-form. It’s just a phonetic contraction. So Natsuko-san, say you want to eat pizza.
Natsuko: ピザ食べたい。(Piza tabetai.)
Peter: Yoshi-san,
Yoshi: ピザ食べてぇ。(Piza tabetee.)
Peter: Notice the extension there. It’s not the short て (te). It’s usually extended. Next we have a very popular construction. You don’t want to eat pizza.
Natsuko: ピザ食べたくない。(Piza tabetakunai.)
Peter: Yoshi-san?
Yoshi: ピザ食べたくねぇ。(Piza tabetakunee.)
Peter: That ねぇ (nee) because ない (nai) is quite common in Japanese, this is a really popular one. Now, very informal. We don’t recommend you throwing this one around unless it is a really good friend. You know, you don’t want to get into bad habits but knowing what’s going around you, this is really good for that. You will hear this in anime all the time. You will hear this when guys are speaking and then one day, it will all start to make sense what they are saying. Maybe right, Natsuko-san?
Natsuko: Yes, sure.
Peter: And last thing we want to point out in today’s lesson.
Yoshi: ありがとう。おかげで、目が覚めたよ。(Arigatō. Okage de me ga sameta yo.)
Peter: Thank you. Thanks to you. I came to my senses. It literally means your eyes have woken. Your eyes are awake.
Yoshi: Yes.
Peter: 目が覚める。(Me ga sameru.) But that’s the literal meaning. When we take it in context, it means to wake up, snap out of it. So thanks to his friend throwing a bucket of water on him. He is back in the game. He is kind of – he snapped out of it. So this expression 目が覚める (me ga sameru), wake up. It’s also used to mean to wake up.
Natsuko: Yes.
Peter: Maybe not the actual emotion of getting up but opening your eyes.
Natsuko: Yes.
Peter: And being aware of what’s going on.
Natsuko: Uhoo.

Outro

Peter: With that said, that will do it for today. Stop by japanesepod101.com.
Natsuko: じゃ、また明日ね。(Ja, mata ashita ne.)
Yoshi: またね。(Mata ne.)

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JapanesePod101.com Verified
September 7th, 2006 at 06:30 PM
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Mina-san, Today's location is ボゴタ・Bogota - hello to all of our listeners in Bogota, Colombia! Yoroshiku onegai shimasu! :grin:

JapanesePod101.com Verified
October 7th, 2020 at 12:05 PM
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Hi drew cunningham,


Thank you for your comment!😄 I totally understand how you feel!! You are NOT alone!

I am STILL learning English and I do feel sometimes I want to just give up, too. Daijōbu desu! Dekimasu yo!

Please don't give up! "Practice makes perfect!" Sukoshi zutsu, korekara mo ganbatte kudasai!👍

Please let us know if you have any questions!


Best regards,

Izumi

Team JapanesePod101.com

drew cunningham
October 5th, 2020 at 08:04 AM
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kyoo no jugyou wa totemo muzukashikute kara, tokidoki ni nihongo o yametai to omoimasu ~~~!!!!!😞

JapanesePod101.com Verified
September 30th, 2017 at 02:46 PM
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イギリスジムさん、

こんにちは。

I'm sorry for the very late reply!!

かぶれ is an imperative form of the verb かぶる which is used to wear (or put on) something.

Hope this helps!?


Natsuko (奈津子),

Team JapanesePod101.com

イギリスジム
August 28th, 2017 at 01:59 AM
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Hello Team JapanesePod101.com,


「じゃあ、これでもかぶれ。」has been translated into English as "Then take this."


Can you give me some more information about 「.. かぶれ」The only dictionary definition I can find translates かぶれ as a - rash or skin irritation. My attempt to translate came out as "Well, here is also a rash." I'm obviously nowhere near an understanding of 「.. かぶれ」so can you give me some more background?


お願いします。

JapaneePod101.com
April 14th, 2016 at 12:02 PM
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Megan san,

konnithiwa.:smile:

We are sorry about the late reply.

That is the negative te-form indicates reasons, which is similar to ‘着かないから.‘

However, Japanese native speakers don’t like direct expressions and tend not to finish sentences.

Indication is important in Japanese conversations.

Yuki 由紀

Team JapanesePod101.com

Megan
March 29th, 2016 at 07:35 PM
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『いやー、まだ気持ちの整理が着かなくて』


この文章が分かるけどどうして『くて』を使っていますか。

Hi I understand the meaning but why does the sentence end with the 'kute' form?

JapanesePod101.com Verified
August 25th, 2015 at 11:05 PM
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エリックさん、

こんにちは。

どういたしまして。

:smile:

Yuki 由紀

Team JapanesePod101.com

エリック
August 24th, 2015 at 10:30 PM
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由紀さん、


あぁ、なるほど。ほんとうにありがとうございました。 :thumbsup:

JapanesePod101.com Verified
August 24th, 2015 at 09:08 PM
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エリックさん、

こんにちは。

「てつだう」はHelpですが、「たすける」はSave に近いです。

「しゅくだいをてつだってくれた。He helped me to do homework.」と言いますが、「しゅくだいをたすけてくれた。」とは言いません。

「あぶないところをたすけてくれた he saved me being in danger.」と言いますが。「あぶないところをてつだってくれた」とは言いません。

I hope it could be helpful.


Yuki 由紀

Team JapanesePod101.com

エリック
August 24th, 2015 at 09:59 AM
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「てつだう」と「たすける」の違いは何ですか。りょうほうともは、英語で「to help」じゃないですか。

What's the difference between 「てつだう」 and 「たすける」? Do they not both mean "to help" in English?