Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Notes

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Lesson Transcript

Intro

Tomoyuki: こんにちは (kon'nichiwa)、Tomoyuki です(desu)。
Jessi: Hi everyone! Jessi here. Counting Down to the New Year in Japan. Welcome everyone to our second season of Absolute Beginner!
Tomoyuki: ようこそ (Yōkoso)!Welcome!
Jessi: You know, the response we got from Absolute Beginner Season 1 was pretty incredible! We were quite surprised. So now, we're back with a second season.
Tomoyuki: そうですね (Sō desu ne)! That's right. We hope you enjoy Season 2 as well. よろしくおねがいします!(Yoroshiku onegaishimasu! )
Jessi: よろしくおねがいします!(Yoroshiku onegaishimasu! ) To give a little background, in this series, we simplify Japanese grammar as much as possible, and teach Japanese through easy to use patterns and expressions.
Tomoyuki: So you can start talking right away.
Jessi: Yes, the patterns are simple, so you can use them right away.
Tomoyuki: Jessi, let's explain the story a little.
Jessi: Sure! If you listened to Season 1, then you know that this series revolves around the story of Taylor Allen, an American who lives in the United States with his wife Chiemi. In season 1, Taylor's brother-in-law, Masato, and his wife, Kaori, came to visit.
Tomoyuki: It was their first time in the US.
Jessi: Right. This time, Masato and Kaori are back in Japan, but they are still keeping in touch with Taylor and Chiemi.
Tomoyuki: Jessi, what are we going to learn in this lesson, Lesson 1?
Jessi: In this lesson, you'll review numbers 1-10, and learn useful phrases for the New Years holiday.
Tomoyuki: You will hear formal Japanese in this lesson.
Jessi: Okay, let's listen to the dialogue!
Dialogue
A: 10、9、8、7、6、5、4、3、2、1 …。(Jū, kyū, hachi, nana, roku, gō, yon, san, ni, ichi….)
B: あけまして おめでとう ございます! (Akemashite omedetō gozaimasu.)
Jessi: Let’s listen to the conversation again slowly.
A: 10、9、8、7、6、5、4、3、2、1 …。(Jū, kyū, hachi, nana, roku, gō, yon, san, ni, ichi….)
B: あけまして おめでとう ございます! (Akemashite omedetō gozaimasu.)
Jessi: Now let’s listen to it with the translation.
A: 10、9、8、7、6、5、4、3、2、1 …。(Jū, kyū, hachi, nana, roku, gō, yon, san, ni, ichi….)
Jessi: Ten, nine, eight, seven, six, five, four, three, two, one...
B: あけまして おめでとう ございます! (Akemashite omedetō gozaimasu.)
Jessi: Happy New Year!
Vocab and Phrases
Jessi: あけましておめでとうございま~す!(Akemashite omedetō gozaimāsu.)
Tomoyuki: あけましておめでとうございます。(Akemashite omedetō gozaimasu.)
Jessi: Happy New Year! We'll break down this phrase in a moment, but let's talk about New Years.
Tomoyuki: Sure!
Jessi: So in the dialogue, we heard a New Year's countdown!
Tomoyuki: It sounds like it was a countdown party.
Jessi: Yeah, it did! Are countdown parties common in Japan, by the way?
Tomoyuki: Well, some places have countdown parties or events.
Jessi: Oh really?
Tomoyuki: Yes, for example, Tokyo Disneyland has a countdown event every year. Other places, like clubs or bars, have countdown events, but I don't think they are as common as in other countries.
Jessi: Hmm, I think I know what you mean... in Japan, New Year's is more of a family holiday, and lots of people are likely to be at home with their families relaxing on New Year's Eve.
Tomoyuki: Yeah, I would say so.
Jessi: Okay, so speaking of New Year's, let's go over how to say Happy New Year in Japanese!
Tomoyuki: Sounds good. The full phrase is あけまして おめでとうございます。(Akemashite omedetō gozaimasu.)
Jessi: [slowly] あけまして おめでとう ございます。(Akemashite omedetō gozaimasu.)
Tomoyuki: That's right. あけまして おめでとうございます。(Akemashite omedetō gozaimasu.)
Jessi: It's pretty long! But, we can break this phrase up actually.
Tomoyuki: Yes. The last part, おめでとうございます (omedetō gozaimasu), literally means "congratulations".
Jessi: [slowly] おめでとうございます(omedetō gozaimasu)
Tomoyuki: おめでとうございます(omedetō gozaimasu)
Jessi: おめでとうございます(omedetō gozaimasu). When we add あけまして (akemashite) to the front of it, the phrase has the meaning of happy New Year.
Tomoyuki: あけましておめでとうございます。(Akemashite omedetō gozaimasu.)
Jessi: Can you say it a little slower?
Tomoyuki: OK. あけましておめでとうございます。(Akemashite omedetō gozaimasu.)
Jessi: Again at natural speed?
Tomoyuki: あけましておめでとうございます。(Akemashite omedetō gozaimasu.)
Jessi: あけましておめでとうございます。(Akemashite omedetō gozaimasu.) OK. Please repeat after Tomoyuki. "Happy New Year".
Tomoyuki: あけましておめでとうございます。(Akemashite omedetō gozaimasu.)
[pause for 5 sec]
Jessi: Great! あけましておめでとうございます。(Akemashite omedetō gozaimasu.)
Tomoyuki: Sounds good!
Jessi: Now, if you remember, the last part at the end, ございます (gozaimasu), tells us that this is a formal phrase. That means we use it with people older than us, strangers, and so on. So, Tomoyuki, what do we do if we want to make this phrase informal, and say Happy New Year to our friends or family?
Tomoyuki: It's very simple. We just take off the ございます (gozaimasu) at the end. We're left with あけましておめでとう。(Akemashite omedetō)
Jessi: あけまして おめでとう。 (Akemashite omedetō) That's pretty simple, right? This is how you would say Happy New Years in an informal way. One more time, Tomoyuki?
Tomoyuki: あけまして おめでとう。(Akemashite omedetō)
Jessi: Okay listeners, please repeat after Tomoyuki. Happy New Year - informal.
Tomoyuki: あけまして おめでとう。(Akemashite omedetō)
[pause for 5 sec]
Jessi: Okay! Let's recap with a quick quiz. Listeners, how do you say Happy New Year in a formal way?
[pause for 5 sec]
Jessi: The answer is...?
Tomoyuki: あけましておめでとうございます。(Akemashite omedetō gozaimasu.)
Jessi: あけましておめでとうございます。(Akemashite omedetō gozaimasu.) All right, now how do you say it in an informal way?
[pause for 5 sec]
Jessi: The answer is...?
Tomoyuki: あけましておめでとう。(Akemashite omedetō gozaimasu.)
Jessi: あけましておめでとう。(Akemashite omedetō gozaimasu.) Excellent!! Now let's move on to the Lesson Focus.

Lesson focus

Jessi: In this lesson, you'll review how to count from one to ten in Japanese. We covered numbers 1-10 in the last season, but I think they're definitely something worth going over again.
Tomoyuki: Knowing how to count is very important.
Jessi: Very! Just think of how often you use numbers when you speak - when you talk about dates, give your age, tell someone your phone number... numbers are everywhere!
Tomoyuki: They can be hard to remember, too.
Jessi: I agree, numbers are always difficult for me in a foreign language. So that's why we'd like to review numbers here in this first lesson.
Let's start with the numbers 1-10. Tomoyuki will give you the word, and I'll follow with the translation.
1 いち (ichi) one
2 に (ni) two
3 さん (san) three
4 よん (yon) four
5 ご (go) five
6 ろく (roku) six
7 なな (nana) seven
8 はち (hachi) eight
9 きゅう (kyū) nine
10 じゅう (jū) ten
Jessi: Okay, now let's do that one more time. This time, listeners - be prepared to repeat after Tomoyuki.
Tomoyuki: 1 いち (ichi)
2 に (ni)
3 さん (san)
4 よん (yon)
5 ご (go)
6 ろく (roku)
7 なな (nana)
8 はち (hachi)
9 きゅう (kyū)
10 じゅう (jū)
Jessi: Great! So that was numbers 1-10. Basically, the numbers from 1-10 are something that you have to memorize. Let's practice saying 1-3... repeat after Tomoyuki.
Tomoyuki: 1 いち (ichi), 2 に (ni), 3 さん (san)
[pause]
Jessi: Next from 4-6.
Tomoyuki: 4 よん (yon), 5 ご (go), 6 ろく (roku)
[pause]
Jessi: Finally from 7-10
Tomoyuki: 7 なな (nana), 8 はち (hachi), 9 きゅう (kyū), 10 じゅう (jū)
[pause]
Jessi: All together from 1-10.
Tomoyuki: 1 いち (ichi)
2 に (ni)
3 さん (san)
4 よん (yon)
5 ご (go)
6 ろく (roku)
7 なな (nana)
8 はち (hachi)
9 きゅう (kyū)
10 じゅう (jū)
[pause].
Jessi: Okay! Are you ready to be quizzed on random numbers?
Tomoyuki: Jessi, what's your favorite number?
Jessi: My favorite number? Hmm.. I'll say... lucky number 7!
Tomoyuki: Listeners, what's 7 in Japanese?
[pause]
Jessi: Tomoyuki, 7 is...?
Tomoyuki: なな (nana)
Jessi: なな (nana)! So my favorite number is なな (nana), seven. Tomoyuki, what's your favorite number?
Tomoyuki: Three!
Jessi: Okay listeners, what is 3 in Japanese?
[pause]
Jessi: Tomoyuki, 3 is...?
Tomoyuki: さん (san)
Jessi: さん (san)!How are you doing, are you getting them right?
Tomoyuki: I know, now let's add 3 and 7.
Jessi: When we add 3 and 7 we get... 10!
Tomoyuki: Listeners, what's 10 in Japanese?
[pause]
Jessi: Tomoyuki, 10 is...?
Tomoyuki: じゅう (jū)
Jessi: じゅう (jū)!

Outro

Tomoyuki: Okay, how was it?
Jessi: Okay, well that's going to do it for this lesson!
Tomoyuki: Thanks for listening.
Jessi: See you all next time.
Tomoyuki: Bye.

Grammar

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223 Comments

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😄 😞 😳 😁 😒 😎 😠 😆 😅 😜 😉 😭 😇 😴 😮 😈 ❤️️ 👍

JapanesePod101.com Verified
January 2nd, 2012 at 06:30 PM
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Mina-san, how do you bring in the new year in your house? Let us know below!

JapanesePod101.com Verified
September 24th, 2021 at 06:39 PM
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Hi Diane,


Thank you so much for your kind words!

We are really happy to know that you enjoy our lessons😊

Please let us know if you have any question:)


Thank you for learning Japanese with us.


Sincerely,

Miho

Team JapanesePod101.com

Diane
September 19th, 2021 at 12:28 AM
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Hello Miiho,


Thank you for taking time to answer my question. There is so much to learn in Japanese. I'm now on lesson 47 and will keep going slowly but surely...Cannot say enough how much I love this series and beyond.


Sincerely,

Diane

JapanesePod101.com Verified
August 31st, 2021 at 11:05 AM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Hi Diane,


Thank you for your comment!

Yes, よろしくおねがいします is used as a greeting when you meet someone for the first time.

This phrase is contextual and gets its meaning depending on the situation.

You can also use it when starting a class or lesson (usually learners say it, but also teachers do).

And when you ask a favor to someone, in this case it means like thank you in advance.


Hope you enjoy learning Japanese with us:)


Sincerely,

Miiho

Team JapanesePod101.com

Diane
August 11th, 2021 at 12:12 AM
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おはようございます!

At the beginning of the introduction, both Jesse and Tomoyuki said よろしくおねがいします!What does it mean here? I know we use it when first meeting someone (it’s a pleasure to meet you).

ありがとうございます。

JapanesePod101.com Verified
January 4th, 2021 at 03:58 PM
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Tanisha Singhさん


Thank you so much for your comment😄

When 4, 7 and 9 are in one's place, you can use either よん (yon) or し (shi), なな (nana) or しち (shichi) and きゅう (kyu) or く (ku) respectively. However, when they are in ten's place or above, you always have to use the first ones for each (よん, なな and きゅう). For example, you can read 17 as じゅうなな (ju nana) or じゅうしち (ju shichi), but 70 is only ななじゅう (nana ju).


Please let us know if you have any questions :)


Sincerely

Ryoma

Team JapanesePod101.com

Tanisha Singh
January 2nd, 2021 at 05:16 PM
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Is 7 called 'nana' or 'shichi'??

And is 4 called 'yon' or 'shi'??

JapanesePod101.com Verified
January 23rd, 2020 at 04:13 AM
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Hi Monica,


Thank you for your comment!

What I can think of right now is, when you count to 10, you can say "shi" for 4.

However, when you count down to 0 from 10, we always say "yon" for 4.😄

Also, when you talk about age, how old people are, it's always "yon"(4) and "nana"(7).👍

Please let us know if you have any other questions!


Best regards,

Izumi

Team JapanesePod101.com

Monica
January 6th, 2020 at 10:20 PM
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Konnichiwa JapanesePod101 team,


Are there rules for when to use shi vs yon and shichi vs nana for four and seven?


Arigato gozaimasu!

JapanesePod101.com Verified
September 5th, 2019 at 06:51 PM
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Konnichiwa Arpit


Thank you for your comment.

You can say both but need little correction for you....


- もとこさん ともゆきさん ようこそ よろしくおねがいします

- ようこそ もとこさん と ともゆきさん よろしく おねがいします

(Not よるしく)


Keep up the good study!


Sono

Team JapanesePod101.com

Arpit
July 4th, 2019 at 09:51 PM
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もとこさん ともゆきさん ようこそ よるしく おねがいします


Or do I say


ようこそ もとこさん と ともゆきさん よるしく おねがいします