Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Transcript

Intro

Risa: Imagine you're meeting your old friend in Japan. What should you say? こんにちは。りさです. Risa here. Greeting an old friend is easy. In this lesson, you’ll learn how. Mark is waiting for his friend who is in a meeting. Let's watch!
Dialogue
Receptionist: タッガートさま、おまたせしました。中村がまいりました。
Mark: ヨシ!
Yoshi: マーク、おひさしぶりです。
Mark: ほんとうにおひさしぶりです。
Yoshi: 元気ですか。
Mark: 元気です。ヨシは元気ですか。
Yoshi: いそがしいです。でも元気です。
Mark: それは、よかったです。これ、アメリカのおみやげです。
Yoshi: ありがとう。じゃ、ひるごはんを食べましょう。そこで、いろいろ話しましょう。
Mark: いいですね。
Risa: Now with English.
Receptionist: Mr. Taggart, sorry to keep you waiting. Nakamura is here.
Mark: Yoshi!
Yoshi: Mark, long time no see!
Mark: I know! It's good to see you again.
Yoshi: How are you?
Mark: I'm good. How are you?
Yoshi: I'm busy, but I'm doing well.
Mark: That's great! Here's a little something from America.
Yoshi: Thank you. Then, let's have lunch! And let's talk a lot there!
Mark: Sounds good!
Vocab
Risa: Here are the keywords from the scene.
Mark: ほんとうに
Kyoko: ほんとうに
Alisha: really
Kyoko: ほんとうに, ほんとうに
Mark: 元気
Kyoko: 元気
Alisha: fine
Kyoko: 元気, 元気
Mark: いそがしい
Kyoko: いそがしい
Alisha: busy
Kyoko: いそがしい, いそがしい
Mark: おみやげ
Kyoko: おみやげ
Alisha: souvenir
Kyoko: おみやげ, おみやげ
Mark: ひるごはん
Kyoko: ひるごはん
Alisha: lunch
Kyoko: ひるごはん, ひるごはん
Mark: たべます
Kyoko: たべます
Alisha: eat
Kyoko: たべます, たべます
Mark: そこで
Kyoko: そこで
Alisha: there
Kyoko: そこで, そこで
Mark: いろいろ
Kyoko: いろいろ
Alisha: a lot, variously
Kyoko: いろいろ, いろいろ
Mark: はなします
Kyoko: はなします
Alisha: talk
Kyoko: はなします, はなします
Mark: よい
Kyoko: よい
Alisha: good
Kyoko: よい, よい
Mark: いい
Kyoko: いい
Alisha: good
Kyoko: いい, いい
Key Phrases
Risa: Here are the key phrases from the scene.
Alisha: In the scene, what did the secretary say when Yoshi appeared in the doorway?
Secretary:タッガートさま、おまたせしました。
Alisha: Here's a word meaning "We've caused you to wait" or "We've kept you waiting."
Kaori: おまたせしました。
Alisha: It's a set phrase and is usually used as a kind of apology. ”Sorry to have kept you waiting."
Kaori: おまたせしました。 おまたせしました。
Alisha: Now, the word for "came" is…
Kaori: まいりました。
Alisha: This is a humble version of the past tense form of the verb meaning "to come." A more common, neutral version would be…
Kaori: きました。
Alisha: But in this case, the secretary used…
Kaori: まいりました
Alisha: …using the humble version for Yoshi's action shows respect to Mark, who is thought of as a guest of the company.
Kaori: 中村がまいりました。
Alisha: "Nakamura has come." Now you try! Say the secretary’s line when Yoshi appears in the doorway.
Kaori: タッガートさま、おまたせしました。
Alisha: In the scene, how did Mark respond when Yoshi said he was doing well?
Mark: それはよかったです。
Alisha: First is the word for "that."
Kaori: それ
Alisha: In this case, "that" indicates what Yoshi has just said. Next is the topic marking particle.
Kaori: は
Alisha: After this is a word meaning "was good."
Kaori: よかった
Alisha: Adding…
Kaori: です
Alisha: …to the end to make
Kaori: よかったです
Alisha: …is a formal form of…
Kaori: よかった。
Alisha: Together it’s…
Kaori: それはよかったです。
Alisha: “That was good.” More naturally, "That's great!" in English. This is a set phrase you can use whenever you hear good news. Now you try! Say Mark's line after Yoshi speaks.
Yoshi: いそがしいです。でも元気です。
Mark: それはよかったです。
Alisha: In the scene, how did Yoshi invite Mark to talk over lunch?
Yoshi:じゃ、ひるごはんを食べましょう。そこで、いろいろ話しましょう。
Alisha: Here, the verbs are…
Kaori: たべましょう
Alisha: …and….
Kaori: はなしましょう。
Alisha: The first is from a verb meaning "to eat."
Kaori: たべます
Alisha: Here it is used in the volitional form, which is…
Kaori: たべましょう
Alisha: Making this volitional form is easy. Just remove
the ending…
Kaori: ます
Alisha: …from…
Kaori: たべます
Alisha: …and add…
Kaori: ましょう
Alisha: …to get the volitional form. Here, it means "Let's eat"
Kaori: たべましょう
Alisha: Do the same thing to get the volitional form for the other verb here, which means "to talk.”
Kaori: はなします
Alisha: Just take the…
Kaori: ます
Alisha: …off of…
Kaori: はなします
Alisha: …and add…
Kaori: ましょう
Alisha: to get the volitional form. Here, it means "Let's talk."
Kaori: はなしましょう。
Alisha: In the scene, these volitional verbs were used first in the sentence meaning, “Then, let's eat lunch.”
Kaori: じゃ、ひるごはんを食べましょう。
Alisha: And then in a sentence meaning, "There, let's talk about a number of things."
Kaori: そこで、いろいろ話しましょう。
Alisha: Now you try! Say Yoshi's next two lines after he says, "Thank you."
Yoshi: ありがとう。
Yoshi: じゃ、ひるごはんを食べましょう。そこで、いろいろ話しましょう。
Alisha: In the scene, what did Mark say in response to Yoshi's suggestion that they have lunch and talk?
Mark:いいですね。
Alisha: This is a set phrase, meaning, "Sounds good."
Kaori: いいですね。いいですね。 いいですね。
Alisha: “Sounds good.” Now you try! Say Mark's line after Yoshi makes his suggestion.
Yoshi: じゃ、ひるごはんを食べましょう。そこで、いろいろ話しましょう。
Mark: いいですね。

Lesson focus

Risa: Now, the lesson focus. Here’s how to greet an old friend. Ready?
Alisha: Do you remember how Yoshi greeted Mark in the scene?
Yoshi:おひさしぶりです。
Alisha: First is the honorific prefix.
Kaori: お
Alisha: Next is a word meaning "it's been a long time."
Kaori: ひさしぶり, ひさしぶり, ひさりぶり
Alisha: Now, you can just say…
Kaori: ひさしぶり
Alisha: to mean "long time no see" in an informal conversation. But if you want to be a bit more formal, add…
Kaori: です
Alisha: …at the end…
Kaori: ひさしぶりです。
Alisha: Now to be even more formal, like Yoshi in the scene, you put the honorific prefix…
Kaori: お
Alisha: …of the phrase…
Kaori: ひさしぶりです。
Alisha: Together it’s…
Kaori: おひさしぶりです。
Alisha: Or "long time no see" for formal situations. Again, here are three ways to say "long time no see" in Japanese depending on the formality of the situation. First is the casual version.
Kaori: ひさしぶり。
Alisha: Next is a polite expression.
Kaori: ひさしぶりです。
Alisha: Last is a very polite expression.
Kaori: おひさしぶりです。
Alisha: Now you try! Imagine you meet a close friend for the first time in a long time. What do you say?
Kaori: ひさしぶり。
Alisha: Now imagine you're meeting an acquaintance for the first time in a long time, but the circumstances are relatively informal. Say "long time no see" in a polite way.
Kaori: ひさしぶりです。
Alisha: Now you're meeting an acquaintance for the first time in a long time in a business setting. Greet this acquaintance in a very polite way.
Kaori: おひさしぶりです。
Alisha: Do you remember how Yoshi asked Mark how he was?
Yoshi:元気ですか。
Alisha: First is the word for "fine" or "well."
Kaori: げんき、げんき、げんき
Alisha: Next is the linking verb, here meaning something like "are."
Kaori: です
Alisha: Last is the question marking particle.
Kaori: か
Alisha: "Are you fine?"
Kaori: げんきですか。 げんきですか。 げんきですか。
Alisha: This is equivalent to "How are you?" in English. In a full sentence, this might be…
Kaori: あなたは元気ですか。
Alisha: But the "you”…
Kaori: あなたは
Alisha: …is clear from the context, and so is omitted. Instead, you can just say
Kaori: 元気ですか。
Alisha: In a casual situation, such as when you meet a close friend, you can also just say…
Kaori: 元気?
Alisha: …to ask "how are you?" Be sure to say it with a rising intonation.
Kaori: 元気?
Alisha: “How are you?” Now you try! Imagine you see an old acquaintance. Ask, "How are you?"
Kaori: げんきですか。
Alisha: Now imagine it's your close friend. Ask, "How are you?"
Kaori: 元気?
Alisha: Do you remember how Mark answered when Yoshi asked him how he was doing?
Mark:元気です。
Alisha: This means "I'm fine."
Kaori: げんきです。げんきです。げんきです。
Alisha: You don't need to always answer this way. If you're not doing well, you could say "so so" or "not bad." Here's the expression for this in Japanese.
Kaori: まあまあです。
Alisha: Also, in business settings, you may hear people say, “I’m busy.”
Kaori: いそがしいです。
Alisha: In business settings, people will usually answer…
Kaori: 元気ですか?
Alisha: …by talking about how the business is doing, and not about themselves. Saying I'm busy…
Kaori: いそがしいです
Alisha: …is a good thing when it comes to business, and Yoshi says this in the scene.
Yoshi:いそがしいです。
Alisha: Now you try! Imagine you're doing fine. Answer the question, "How are you?"
Kaori: 元気です。
Alisha: Now imagine you're not bad. Answer the question, "How are you?"
Kaori: まあまあです。
Alisha: Now, you're busy. Answer the question, "How are you?"
Kaori: いそがしいです。
Practice
Risa: Now, it’s time to practice your new ability.
Alisha: You're in a business setting and meeting an old acquaintance for the first time in a long time. Ready? Here we go. What's the first thing you say to someone you are meeting for the first time in a long time?
Kaori: おひさしぶりです。
Yoshi:おひさしぶりです。
Alisha: How do you ask him "How are you?"
Kaori: げんきですか。
Yoshi: いそがしいです。でも元気です。
Alisha: Now you're asked, "How are you?" Answer "I'm fine."
Yoshi:元気ですか。
Kaori: 元気です。
Alisha: Your acquaintance suggests you go for lunch and talk. Answer, "Sounds good" to his
suggestion.
Yoshi:じゃ、ひるごはんを食べましょう。そこで、いろいろ話しましょう。
Kaori: いいですね。
English:Great job! You’ll follow the same pattern many times, so be sure to practice it.

Outro

Risa: よくできました! Now, watch the scene one more time. After that, practice these phrases with your good friend. じゃまたね!
Dialogue
Receptionist: タッガートさま、おまたせしました。中村がまいりました。
Mark: ヨシ!
Yoshi: マーク、おひさしぶりです。
Mark: ほんとうにおひさしぶりです。
Yoshi: 元気ですか。
Mark: 元気です。ヨシは元気ですか。
Yoshi: いそがしいです。でも元気です。
Mark: それは、よかったです。これ、アメリカのおみやげです。
Yoshi: ありがとう。じゃ、ひるごはんを食べましょう。そこで、いろいろ話しましょう。
Mark: いいですね。

25 Comments

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JapanesePod101.com
Thursday at 6:30 pm
Pinned Comment
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Feel free to let us know if you have any questions.

JapanesePod101.com
January 16th, 2019 at 3:05 pm
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Hi Max,


Thank you for posting!

Wow, you've learned various phrases in greeting.

There's just a little thing to be corrected;

"busy" (isogashii) is written as いそがしい.


Cheers,

Miho

Team JapanesePod101.com


Max
November 18th, 2018 at 7:24 pm
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- 元気ですか?

- はい、 元気です。

- まあまあです。

- いそがしです。


おまたせしました。

それはよかったです。

良いですね。


ありがとうございます!

JapanesePod101.com
April 16th, 2018 at 4:15 pm
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> Jared さん、

こんにちは。I'm sorry for the late reply!!


ます is so-called copula and cannot be translated into English.

It might work something like 'be', but this is not a verb, so I don't think you should

think of any translation or equivalent in English. Instead, please understand that ます is an

affirmative ending of the sentence. :)


Regarding お, at this point, you can simply remember that you can attach お to some nouns and verbs

to be polite. You will learn better in the future lessons. ;)


Hope this helps!


> Kasper Jensen san,

konnichiwa!

I think that's great that this level is somewhat easy for you and you think you're ready to jump to the next level! :)

It's totally up to you and I believe you can trust your own instinct ;)

Besides, you can come back to lower level whenever you want if necessary!

And, thank you very much for a kind concern and letting us know that you were not being disrespectful to our lessons!

We totally understand you and also congratulate you for the progress!! ;)


Natsuko (奈津子),

Team JapanesePod101.com

Kasper Jensen
March 27th, 2018 at 6:32 am
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I feel like many of these "Absolute Beginner" lessons don't quite challenge me sufficiently. I would it be a good idea for me to jump up to "Beginner" or even "Intermediate" level to be challenged a bit more and probably learn a bit faster as a result?


I don't mean to discredit these lessons at all. I think they're great and very entertaining. But as someone who has always had a natural talent for learning languages easily, I feel like I'm close to moving past "Absolute Beginner"... :)

JapanesePod101.com
February 24th, 2018 at 8:58 am
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Hi yutong,


Thank you very much for the comment.

This lesson series' target audience is beginners. That's why hiragana is used for most of the words.

That's great you've figured out the correct kanji for those words you use as an example. Great job!


Miki H

Team JapanesePod101.com

Jared
February 21st, 2018 at 6:59 am
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Also... When do i use the honorific prefix お? I'm still a little bit confused.

Jared
February 21st, 2018 at 6:21 am
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Do all the verbs finish in ます? Is that something like "to" in english? That marks an infinitive verb?

(English is not my native language, so, sorry if i mispelled anything wrong)


Thanks for answering :)

yutong
January 13th, 2018 at 2:48 pm
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why in the subtitles, script and vocabulary does not reflect the correct kanji, but hiragana only? this is very misleading. examples:

参りました was written as まいりました

お土産 as おみやげ

お久しぶりですas おひさしぶりです

本当に as ほんとに

色々 as いろいろ


why?

JapanesePod101.com
June 26th, 2017 at 9:24 am
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Christie san,

Konnichiwa.

Almost all Japanese sentences include kanji and hiragana.

For example, when Japanese native speakers write ‘I am Japanese’, the sentence must be ‘私は日本人です.’

Hiragana is basically used as particles and copula verbs or for younger children.

?

Yuki 由紀

Team JapanesePod101.com

Christie
June 4th, 2017 at 9:46 am
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I want to know if Japanese write Kanji version very often?

I don't understand when they need to use Kanji version and under what conditions they need to use all Hiragana?