Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Transcript

Intro

Jessi:
Jessi here! Absolute Beginner Season 1 , Lesson 6 - Catching Up With an Old Friend in Japan
Jessi:
Hi everyone! Welcome to Absolute Beginner Season 1, Lesson 6 Catching Up With an Old Friend in Japan. Jessiです。Jessi here.
Naomi:
こんにちは!なおみです。Naomi here!
Jessi:
Thanks for joining us again! Okay, we have finished the five introduction lessons, and now we're ready to jump into the story of Taylor Allen!
Naomi:
What can you tell us about the story?
Jessi:
Well, Taylor is an American living in California who is married to a Japanese woman named Chiemi. Chiemi's brother Masato, and his wife Kaori,are visiting Taylor's house in the US for the first time. Chiemi is not around to help out, though, so Taylor does his best to communicate with them in Japanese.
Naomi:
Sounds good! Let's see how Taylor does!
Jessi:
In these lessons, we'll teach you Japanese through sentence patterns and expressions.
Naomi:
We won't worry too much about grammar in this series.
Jessi:
In this first part of Taylor's story, Taylor is meeting his brother-in-law Masato and Masato's wife Kaori at the airport. They're distant family members who don't know each other very well, so they will be using...
Naomi:
Formal Japanese.
Jessi:
Let's listen to the conversation!
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
まさと:
あ、テイラーさん?
テイラー:
まさとさん!おひさしぶりです!
まさと:
おひさしぶりです!
English Host:
Now let's listen to it with the translation.
まさと:
あ、テイラーさん?
Jessi:
Oh, Taylor?
テイラー:
まさとさん!おひさしぶりです!
Jessi:
Masato! It's been a while!
まさと:
おひさしぶりです!
Jessi:
Long time no see!
KEY VOCABULARY AND PHRASES
Jessi:
So Taylor met up with his brother-in-law and his wife at the airport!
Naomi:
They're visiting from Japan.
Jessi:
Yup, and it's not their first time meeting, is it?
Naomi:
Nope.
Jessi:
We'll talk more about that later on in the lesson. Here, let's introduce an important word we heard in the conversation. Naomi, that is...?
Naomi:
さん.
Jessi:
さん. They said it after each other's names.
Naomi:
Right, so Taylor became テイラーさん, and Masato become まさとさん.
Jessi:
It comes after names, so it's really a suffix. So why do we put this after people's names?
Naomi:
To show respect. It is essential to use さん when speaking formal Japanese.
Jessi:
Yes, so that means with anyone who is older than you or has higher social status than you or someone you don't know well, you should use さん after their name.
Naomi:
It can come after their first name or last name.
Jessi:
That's right! For example, Taylor Allen is the character's full name, so what are the possible ways to use さん?
Naomi:
For Taylor Allen, you could say テイラーさん or アレンさん or テイラーアレンさん.They're all okay.
Jessi:
In the conversation, they used it after their first names.
Naomi:
Just know that it can be used with both.

Lesson focus

Jessi:
In this lesson, you'll learn how to greet someone you haven't seen in a long time.
Naomi:
There's one phrase you will learn for that in this lesson.
Jessi:
We'll go over two variations of that phrase - the formal version, and informal version. First, can we hear the formal version that we heard in the dialogue?
Naomi:
Sure. お久しぶりです.
Jessi:
お久しぶりです.
Naomi:
お久しぶりです
Jessi:
And one time slowly?
Naomi:
(Slowly) お久しぶりです.
Jessi:
And one more time regular speed.
Naomi:
お久しぶりです
Jessi:
And this means...
Naomi:
Long time no see!
Jessi:
Right! Long time no see, or, it's been awhile!
Naomi:
That's how we knew Taylor and Masato had meet each other before.
Jessi:
Because they used お久しぶりです。
Naomi:
Long time no see. Listeners, now you try it!
Jessi:
Repeat after Naomi
Naomi:
お久しぶりです。
[Pause]
Jessi:
Okay. And one more time.
Naomi:
お久しぶりです!
[Pause]
Jessi:
Okay! So that's the formal version. If you want to say this to a friend, what would be a better way to say it?
Naomi:
Well, did you notice how this phrase started with an お sound, and ended with です? Just take those sounds away.
Jessi:
When you do that, you're left with...
Naomi:
ひさしぶり
Jessi:
ひさしぶり
Naomi:
ひさしぶり
Jessi:
And one time slowly?
Naomi:
(Slowly) ひさしぶり
Jessi:
And one more time regular speed
Naomi:
ひさしぶり!
Jessi:
Listeners, now you try it! Repeat after Naomi
Naomi:
ひさしぶり
[Pause]
Jessi:
And one more time.
Naomi:
ひさしぶり!
[Pause]
Jessi:
Okay. Now we know both the formal version, and informal version!
Naomi:
Okay, now let's practice what we've learned.
Jessi:
All right! We'll set up another situation. Let's say Naomi and I haven't seen each other for a long time. Listen to what we say when we see each other.
Naomi:
ジェシーさん、お久しぶりです!
Jessi:
なおみさん、お久しぶりです!
Jessi:
Okay. So now it's your turn! Pretend you're the one meeting Naomi for the first time in a long time. Please respond to her. Don't forget to use さん - remember what we learned about that and our main phrase from this lesson!
(Sound effect - footsteps?)
Naomi:
あ、お久しぶりです!
[Pause]
Naomi:
If you said...
Jessi:
なおみさん、お久しぶりです!
Naomi:
You're correct!
Jessi:
Yay! And don't forget the name plus さん when speaking politely.
Naomi:
Right!

Outro

Jessi:
Okay, well that's going to wrap up this lesson!
Naomi:
Thanks for listening, and don't forget to check out the Lesson Notes PDF. Lesson Notes are an important part.
Jessi:
Use them on the site or a mobile device or print them out. Go to JapanesePod101.com to download the Lesson Notes for this lesson now. In the next lesson, you'll learn more ways to say "thanks" and "you're welcome." Hope to see you then!
Naomi:
Until next time!

343 Comments

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JapanesePod101.com
Monday at 6:30 pm
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Everyone, is there anyone you haven’t seen for a while to whom you could say “o-hisashiburi desu!”?

June 21st, 2017 at 2:41 pm
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> Katelynn Wales san,
konnichiwa!
I’m very sorry no one has replied to you properly until now!!! 😞

The purpose of using dash is just a practical thing.
We don’t actually use dash in Japanese. We use it only when we write in romaji
to separate a word, but not completely.
The long horizontal line in ジェシーさん isn’t dash. This shows the long sound.
e.g.
シ [shi]
シー [shii] (longer sound)

Hope this helps!

> Miguel Ángel san,
konnichiwa!! Ohisashiburi desu. 😁

Natsuko (奈津子),
Team JapanesePod101.com

Miguel Ángel
June 15th, 2017 at 6:02 pm
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Kon’nichi wa Japanesepod-san! O-hisashiburi desu. 😎

June 14th, 2017 at 8:19 pm
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Hi Saruwatari,

Thank you for your message.

In the Lesson Vocabulary you can listen to the audio in slow speed and also record your voice to check your pronunciation.

Don’t worry, practice makes perfect.😉

Also, please check out our special series on pronunciation:
https://www.japanesepod101.com/category/ultimate-japanese-pronunciation-guide/

If you have any further questions, please let us know😉

Cristiane (クリスチアネ)
Team Japanesepod101.com

Saruwatari
June 14th, 2017 at 6:06 pm
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o-hisashiburi desu is very hard to pronounce.

May 28th, 2017 at 8:08 pm
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Chandra Ardy さん、
Konnichiwa.
‘Desu ne’ indicates confirmation of agreement.
For example, ‘kyou wa atsui desune’ which means ‘its’s hot isn’t it?’.
😄
Yuki 由紀
Team JapanesePod101.com

Chandra Ardy
May 8th, 2017 at 2:42 am
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Hi, JapanesePod101.com.

Googling told me that “…, desu ne” may mean sort of “…, isn’t it?”
What does “desu ne” actually add to the conversation?

ありがとうございます。😁

May 3rd, 2017 at 8:24 pm
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Hi Shishir,

Thank you for posting.
Please check out our Japanese blog with a detailed explanation of the use of all honorifics:
http://blogs.japanesepod101.com/blog/2016/07/11/japanese-honorifics-guide-san-kun-chan-sama-and-more/

-Chan (ちゃん), most frequently used for girls and between them, children, close friends, or lovers. This can be used when somebody finds a person, a pet, or something adorable and cute.
-Kun (くん), the most commonly used honorific in anime. It is used to address young males. It is also used by superiors to inferiors and male of the same age and status.

@hyenguyen

Thank you for your message.
Maybe these tips can help you for better understanding of the English in the lessons, as you mentioned you have some difficulties with the language:
You can adjust the audio (in audio lessons) and video (in video lessons) speed by clicking on the ‘1x’ button next to the volume control icon.
Also, there are lots of support materials such as Lesson Notes pdf, Lesson Transcript pdf, Lesson Materials, etc. Especially the transcript can help you with understanding better what is said in the lesson as it has the complete dialogue transcript.
There are also many support resources for improving your skills:
https://www.japanesepod101.com/japanese-resources/

We hope this helps. Let us know if you have any further questions.

@Katelynn
@Katerina
Thank you for your message.
Our team will reply your message asap 😉

@Isabella
Thank you for posting!

@Selene
Thank you for your message.
If you wish to start a plan, please check out:
https://www.japanesepod101.com/member/member_upnewapi.php
With the basic plan, for example, on you’ll have:
Complete Lesson Archive Access (Access to every single audio & video lesson we’ve ever created);
Access to the PDF Lesson Notes (Printable PDF Lesson Notes with every lesson);
Access to the Lesson Checklist.

There are also lots of free contents in case you prefer to choose a plan later, ok😉

Feel free to let us know if you have any questions.

Cristiane (クリスチアネ)
Team Japanesepod101.com

Shishir
May 3rd, 2017 at 4:37 pm
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When do we say “Chan,” and “kun”

hyenguyen
April 25th, 2017 at 1:28 pm
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difficult to learn this cuz my english is not my mother’s language ! almost I don’t understand the expressions by listening ! anyway, it’s good !

Katelynn Wales
April 23rd, 2017 at 2:37 am
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When using katakana for someone’s name and, the suffix, san, is it necessary to use a dash. For example, “ジェシーさん” when compared to “なおみさん.” What is the dash’s purpose?