Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Yura: Hi everyone, I'm Yura.
Natsuko: And I’m Natsuko!
Yura: And welcome to Culture Class: Essential Japanese Vocabulary, Lesson 16! In this lesson you'll learn 5 essential words related to People &Homes. These are five common items found in Japanese homes. Hand picked. You can find a complete list of vocabulary at JapanesePod101.com
FIVE KEY VOCABULARY ITEMS
Yura: Natsuko, what’s our first word?
Natsuko: 仏壇
Yura: a family Buddhist altar
Natsuko: (slow) 仏壇 (regular) 仏壇
Yura: Listeners, please repeat:
Natsuko: 仏壇
[pause - 5 sec.]
Yura:
A ""butsudan"" is a family Buddhist altar. The size of this altar varies, but it usually takes the form of a wooden cabinet with doors. Memorial tablets for deceased family members and ancestors are often kept inside. -
Yura: Now, let's hear a sample sentence using this word.
Natsuko: (normal) 仏壇は、古くから日本の家庭において中心的な存在でした。
Yura: The family Buddhist altar is traditionally an essential and spiritual center of a Japanese family.
Natsuko: (slow) 仏壇は、古くから日本の家庭において中心的な存在でした。
Yura: Okay, what’s the next word?
Natsuko: 神棚
Yura: a household altar
Natsuko: (slow) 神棚 (regular) 神棚
Yura: Listeners, please repeat:
Natsuko: 神棚
[pause - 5 sec.]
Yura:
A ""kamidana"" is a miniature altar to enshrine a deity which is set on a high position on a wall. Since most Japanese live with both Shinto and Buddhist influences, a lot of mixed religious customs are found in everyday life. -
Yura: Now, let's hear a sample sentence using this word.
Natsuko: (normal) 神棚の一番一般的な形は、お札を中に収める、「札宮」という神棚です。
Yura: The most common type of miniature altar has a miniature shrine with a talisman inside it, which is called a ""fudamiya"".
Natsuko: (slow) 神棚の一番一般的な形は、お札を中に収める、「札宮」という神棚です。
Yura: Okay, what’s the next word?
Natsuko: 玄関
Yura: house entrance
Natsuko: (slow) 玄関 (regular) 玄関
Yura: Listeners, please repeat:
Natsuko: 玄関
[pause - 5 sec.]
Yura:
A Japanese house entrance is normally raised, so that people take off their shoes in the lower area before stepping up into the house. Because of this custom of taking the shoes off before entering, Japanese front doors usually open outwards. -
Yura: Now, let's hear a sample sentence using this word.
Natsuko: (normal) 玄関で靴を脱いだ後は、つま先がドアの方を向くようにそろえます。
Yura: After taking your shoes off at the entrance, the shoes should be lined up neatly with the toes pointing towards the front door.
Natsuko: (slow) 玄関で靴を脱いだ後は、つま先がドアの方を向くようにそろえます。
Yura: Okay, what’s the next word?
Natsuko: こたつ
Yura: table with an electric heater
Natsuko: (slow) こたつ (regular) こたつ
Yura: Listeners, please repeat:
Natsuko: こたつ
[pause - 5 sec.]
Yura:
A ""kotatsu"" is a table with an electric heater usually covered with a blanket or other such covering. Japanese people often use a ""kotatsu"" instead of a normal table in winter, and sit down around the ""kotatsu"" with their legs under the blanket. -
Yura: Now, let's hear a sample sentence using this word.
Natsuko: (normal) 日本の典型的な冬のイメージは、家族がこたつを囲んでミカンを食べる様子です。
Yura: A typical image of winter in Japan is a family sitting around a ""kotatsu"" eating mandarin oranges.
Natsuko: (slow) 日本の典型的な冬のイメージは、家族がこたつを囲んでミカンを食べる様子です。
Yura: Okay, what’s the last word?
Natsuko: 畳
Yura: tatami mat
Natsuko: (slow) 畳 (regular) 畳
Yura: Listeners, please repeat:
Natsuko: 畳
[pause - 5 sec.]
Yura:
Tatami mats are used as flooring in traditional Japanese rooms. Their surface is covered with woven soft rushes, and is softer than a wooden floor. -
Yura: Now, let's hear a sample sentence using this word.
Natsuko: (normal) 日本では、およそ9.9平方メートルの部屋を「6畳」と表すように、部屋の大きさを畳の数で表します。
Yura: The area of a room in Japan is often described by the number of tatami mats it contains, such as ""6 tatami mats"" for a room measuring around 9.9 square meters.
Natsuko: (slow) 日本では、およそ9.9平方メートルの部屋を「6畳」と表すように、部屋の大きさを畳の数で表します。
QUIZ
Yura: Okay listeners, are you ready to be quizzed on the words you just learned? Natsuko will give you the Japanese – please say the English meaning out loud! Are you ready?
Natsuko: 仏壇
[pause]Yura: a family Buddhist altar
Natsuko: 神棚
[pause]Yura: a household altar
Natsuko: 玄関
[pause]Yura: house entrance
Natsuko: こたつ
[pause]Yura: table with an electric heater
Natsuko: 畳
[pause]Yura: tatami mat

Outro

Yura: There you have it – five common things in Japanese homes! We have more vocab lists available at JapanesePod101.com, so be sure to check them out. Thanks everyone, see you next time!
Natsuko: またね!

8 Comments

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😄 😞 😳 😁 😒 😎 😠 😆 😅 😜 😉 😭 😇 😴 😮 😈 ❤️️ 👍

JapanesePod101.com Verified
August 19th, 2013 at 06:30 PM
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What else are you expecting to find inside a Japanese home?

JapanesePod101.com Verified
October 25th, 2014 at 01:31 PM
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セーラさん、

Konnichiwa. :smile:

Well...I think it depends on people.

Japanese apartments usually are not furnished so if residence likes doing that, it can.


Yuki 由紀

Team JapanesePod101.com

セーラ
October 22nd, 2014 at 09:03 AM
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Do one bedroom apartments in Japan has a Kotatsu year round?

JapanesePod101.com Verified
September 29th, 2013 at 03:34 PM
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Sean-san,

thank you very much for the suggestion!

I'll share your post with my team and discuss for better lesson in the future! :wink:

I'm glad you found complex sentences were even helpful.


As to your question,

と works to make a clause or reference clause.

This can be translated as "that" (to make a clause), or "such as". In this case here,

"such as" would be suitable translation when we translate entire sentence.

We often use this と like quotation marks ( " " ) to refer to something someone said.

ex. りんごを買ってきて、と言われました。 (= I was told "please get/buy an apple".)


Hope this helps!


Natsuko (奈津子),

Team JapanesePod101.com

Sean
September 29th, 2013 at 08:48 AM
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Oh yeah and [..lolol...] the reason why I came to the comments page in the first place was because of a question from my breakdown...


In the sample sentence 日本では、およそ9.9平方メートルの部屋を「6畳」と表すように、部屋の大きさを畳の数で表します。


Why is the verb 表す (arawasu) preceded by the particle と 'to' ? None of the dictionaries seem to state this...


Cheers

Sean

Sean
September 29th, 2013 at 08:43 AM
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I kind of agree with Phil's comments but would like to make a suggestion for this problem; please consider...


As a response to the situation I have taken to breaking down each sentence. For example, the 秋葉原には、女性がメイド姿で接客をするカフェがたくさんあります I break down into...

秋葉原には as for akihabara

女性が girls

メイド姿で dressed as maids

接客をするカフェが waitress doing café (lit. cafes whose theme is 'waitressing')

たくさんあります many exist


Initially I did this just because (like Phil) it was tough to get much out of the sample sentences, but actually I am finding learning value (by itself) by doing this break down. For example, I am learning more about grammar, and idiomatic expressions, or verb tense, or particles by looking in detail. Plus I am rote learning the sentences, and kanji.


My suggestion is that this breakdown be incorporated somehow to the lessons; i.e. DON'T stop including complex examples; I think they are very valuable!!


FYI on 26th August I sent a mail to jpod mail address with a suggestion for format/content around this idea.

JapanesePod101.com Verified
September 16th, 2013 at 03:04 PM
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Phil-san,

thank you very much for an honest opinion.

I'll share your post with my team and discuss about it.


Please understand something very important: this seris is one of those "cultural lessons" focusing on

Japanese cultures, not corresponding to grammatical level. Our aim in this series is not teaching

grammar or sentences, but it's to introduce some basic cutural matters.

We just hope that our listeners can have chances to learn more than Japanese language

because it is very important to learn things around the language.

So, if some sentences were too difficult for you, please ignore those sentences and

enjoy the contents or cultural matters that you still don't know.


Thank you very much for your understanding.


Natsuko (奈津子),

Team JapanesePod101.com

Phil
September 5th, 2013 at 05:20 PM
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I've been meaning to comment about this series for a while, so this is a complaint about the majority of this series, not just this specific lesson.


In short, this is the most frustrating series JPod have ever produced. Consistency is hugely important for obvious reasons, and yet these lessons regularly give a simple, common, beginner level word, and then embed it in an example sentence which is at best upper intermediate, but more commonly advanced. There is a massive gulf between the vocab levels.


Worse, the example sentences, filled as they are with rare words and complex sentence structures, are never explained beyond a simple direct translation. "Read the PDF" isn't a solution, as these are podcast lessons and must be able to stand alone. If you don't explain everything which the listener might not reasonably be expected to already know in the lesson audio, then the lesson is broken.


Sorry to rant, but every time these lessons pop up I know my blood pressure will end up rising. They're just terrible lessons.