Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Jessi:
Hello, and welcome to Absolute Beginner Season 1, Lesson 11 What is This Delicious Japanese Dish? Jessiです。Jessi here!
Naomi:
こんにちは!なおみです!Hi everyone, Naomi here!
Jessi:
Thanks for joining us in this Absolute Beginner series. In the last lesson, we learned how to that some something belongs to someone.
Naomi:
Yes! For example, わたしのいえ
Jessi:
“My house.”
Naomi:
And in this lesson, you’ll learn to ask what something is.
Jessi:
Yes. Basically, you’ll be able to ask “What’s this?” and “What’s that?” So when someone puts a Japanese dish in front of you that you’ve never seen before…
Naomi:
You’ll be able to ask what it is.
Jessi:
Exactly! Okay, so speaking of food, in this conversation, Taylor, Masato and Kaori are all sitting down to eat!
Naomi:
Yes, Taylor has cooked them dinner.
Jessi:
Mmm… sounds good. Let’s listen in to the conversation!

Lesson conversation

(timer goes off)
テイラー:
はい、どうぞ!
かおり:
うわ~ すごーい!
かおり&まさと:
いただきます。
まさと:
(munch munch munch)うーん。おいしい!
テイラーさん、これは、なんですか?
Jessi:
Let's listen to the conversation again slowly.
テイラー:
はい、どうぞ!
かおり:
うわ~ すごーい!
かおり&まさと:
いただきます。
まさと:
(munch munch munch)うーん。おいしい!
テイラーさん、これは、なんですか?
Jessi:
Now let’s listen to it with the translation.
テイラー:
はい、どうぞ!
Jessi:
Okay, here you go!
かおり:
うわ~ すごーい!
Jessi:
Oh, wow!
かおり&まさと:
いただきます。
Jessi:
Let's eat! (Literally, We are about to receive this meal.)
まさと:
(munch munch munch)うーん。おいしい!
Jessi:
(munch munch munch) Mmm. This is great!
テイラーさん、これは、なんですか?
Jessi:
Taylor, what is this?
KEY VOCABULARY AND PHRASES
Jessi:
Well Naomi, we actually had a lot of new words and phrases in this conversation!
Naomi:
We sure did.
Jessi:
The first one was...?
Naomi:
すごい!
Jessi:
Can we hear one more time slowly?
Naomi:
すごい。
Jessi:
And again at natural speed?
Naomi:
すごい
Jessi:
すごい!Meaning "wow", "great", or "amazing". Basically, you can use this anytime you are impressed by something.
Naomi:
When Taylor placed the food in front of them, Kaori said すごい!
Jessi:
Like "Oh, wow!" She was really impressed by the food. It probably looked really really good!
Naomi:
Yes, it also was something she wasn't used to.
Jessi:
Okay. So now the food has been placed before them. Now on to our next phrase. What did Masato and Kaori say before they ate?
Naomi:
いただきます!
Jessi:
Can we hear one more time slowly?
Naomi:
いただきます。
Jessi:
いただきます! And this a phrase that you say before eating.
Naomi:
Right. You are giving thanks for the meal you are about to have.
Jessi:
It's a good phrase to use anytime you eat, but especially if someone has cooked something for you.
Naomi:
Yes! Saying いただきます is a way to show appreciation.
Jessi:
So in the dialogue, Masato and Kaori said いただきます! before eating the dinner that Taylor had made for them.
Naomi:
If you visit someone's house and they make dinner for you, please try saying いただきます before you eat!
Jessi:
Okay Naomi, and the last word is...?
Naomi:
おいしい
Jessi:
Can we hear one more time slowly?
Naomi:
おいしい
Jessi:
おいしい, meaning "good" or "delicious" when talking about food.
Naomi:
Masato starts eating the food and says うーん、おいしい!
Jessi:
"Mmm, this is great!" If someone makes food for you and you want to tell them that it's good, you can use this word. おいしい!

Lesson focus

Jessi:
In this lesson, you'll learn how to ask what something is.
Naomi:
Do you remember Lesson 9, where we learned how to make a question?
Jessi:
We took our AはBです pattern, and added か at the end. AはBですか? Is A B?
Naomi:
Right. We'll be using this structure to ask what something is.
Jessi:
Okay, so let's get started. In the dialogue, Masato took a bite of his meal, said "Wow" This is great!" and then asked "What is this?"
Naomi:
AFTER he ate it.
Jessi:
Right, after he ate it. He just dug right in. So first, let's learn how to say "What is this?"
Naomi:
As you may remember, "this" is これ。The word for "what" in this case is なん。
Jessi:
So if we put those in place of A and B in our sentence structure we mentioned earlier, we get...
Naomi:
これはなんですか?
Jessi:
これはなんですか? One more time slowly?
Naomi:
これは なんですか?
Jessi:
And one more time normal speed.
Naomi:
これはなんですか?
Jessi:
And that means "What is this?" Listeners, repeat after Naomi.
Naomi:
これはなんですか?
[Pause] - これはなんですか?
Jessi:
Great! Now, remember that これ means "this", so when we ask this question, we're talking about something that we have, or something that is close to us.
Naomi:
Exactly. If you want to talk about something that someone else has...
Jessi:
Like "what's THAT?", then you would use それ in place of これ.
Naomi:
As you may have guessed, それ means "that".
Jessi:
So to sum it up, we have...
Naomi:
これ
Jessi:
This, and...
Naomi:
それ
Jessi:
That. So how would we say, "What's that?"
Naomi:
それはなんですか。
Jessi:
それはなんですか? One more time slowly?
Naomi:
それは なんですか?
Jessi:
And again at normal speed.
Naomi:
それはなんですか?
Jessi:
And that means, "What is that?" Listeners, repeat after Naomi.
Naomi:
それはなんですか?
[Pause] - それはなんですか?
Jessi:
Okay, great! Now you're equipped with two ways to ask what something is - what is this? and what is that?
Naomi:
これはなんですか? and それはなんですか?
Jessi:
Now, let's use them in a role play situation! Let's say that Naomi is an acquaintance of yours, and she is giving you a gift. Ask her "what is this?" Here's a hint, remember that "this" is これ。
Naomi:
はい、どうぞ!おみやげです。
[Pause] - これはなんですか?
Jessi:
Okay! If you said...
Naomi:
これはなんですか?
Jessi:
Then great job! How about one more? You see Naomi eating something, some kind of food you haven't seen before. Ask her "what is that?" Here's a hint, remember that the word for "that" is それ。
Naomi:
(Eating) う~ん、おいしい!
[Pause] - それはなんですか?
Jessi:
If you said...
Naomi:
それはなんですか?
Jessi:
Excellent job!! Naomi, what was it, by the way? That looks good!!
Naomi:
ようかんです。
Jessi:
All right, well that's going to wrap it up for this lesson. In the next lesson, you'll learn to ask if someone or something is okay.
Naomi:
Thanks for listening, everyone! ありがとうございます!
Jessi:
Thank you all! Make sure to leave us any questions you have on this lesson in the lesson comments. See you all next time!
Naomi:
じゃまた!

279 Comments

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JapanesePod101.com
Monday at 6:30 pm
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After this lesson, you’ll be able to ask what something is with NO problems! 😀

Jack
September 15th, 2017 at 11:37 pm
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いただきます。うーん。おいしい。これわなんですか。
これはあんずです。

July 20th, 2017 at 11:25 pm
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Hi Alex,

Thank you for your comment! ‘matane’ is a softer and possibly a more friendly way of saying ’see you soon/ again’. ‘jaa mata’ is still an acceptable way of saying goodbye, however it is a much more casual and effortless phrase. In Japanese culture, it is more common for females to use ‘matane’ to seem softer, friendlier and caring, whilst males often use ‘jaa mata’ to appear more casual and somewhat ‘cool’.

We wish you the best of luck with your further studies.

Piers
Team JapanesePod101.com

Alex
July 13th, 2017 at 6:24 pm
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Hello from Greece!
I would only like to ask the difference between “jaa mata” and “matane”, and if there truly is one.
Thank you very much. ;P

July 13th, 2017 at 5:26 pm
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Hi Briga,

これからの勉強頑張って下さい!Korekara no benkyō ganbatte kudasai! Thank you for your comment!

Piers
Team JapanesePod101.com

Brigida Grace Gamboa Orlanda
June 16th, 2017 at 5:35 pm
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Konichiwa
Grace duse,kyou kara watashi nehongo no japanesepod 101 benkyoushimashita arigatougoshimasu.

Abel
May 23rd, 2017 at 9:33 am
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Konbanwa, Abel desu!
Excuse me, I’m a little bit confused with the following sentence:
“Igirisu no kukki wa oishii.”
Wouldn’t it follow the pattern “A wa B desu”? Or is it possible to omit the desu in this sentence? If it is possible to say with and without it, would it be more informal if I don’t use “desu”?

Thank you and greetings from Brazil! 😄

May 8th, 2017 at 8:24 am
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Bob さん、
Konnichiwa.
うまい is less formal than the other.
😄

Yuki 由紀
Team JapanesePod101.com

Bob
April 17th, 2017 at 11:25 am
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Thank you for this lesson!

I’ve also heard うまい “umai” as an expression for when something is delicious. Is there a difference between this, and おいしい?

March 26th, 2017 at 8:51 pm
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Tiago-san,
konnichiwa!
I’m so sorry for the super late reply!! 😞
The interrogative word ‘nani’ takes the alternative form ‘nan’ when it’s about
numbers, day of the week (any calendar related word), and when it takes ‘desu’
immediately which means it’s a part of predicate.
This means that ‘kore wa nani desu ka’ is incorrect. It’s always ‘nan desu ka’.
I think the reason why you thought ‘nani/nan’ works like both ‘what’ and ‘how’
is because in some cases, sentences using ‘nani/nan’ is translated into natural
English with ‘how’, but it’s just a matter of translation. English and Japanese are
2 different languages, so sometimes we express differently to say the same thing.
Hope this helps! 😉

> Ahmad-san,
konnichiwa! 😄
We don’t have to worry about numbers in that case.
We don’t really have singular vs plural. This also means nouns stay the same
even if the item is one or two or even more.
Beautiful, right? 😁

Natsuko (奈津子),
Team JapanesePod101.com

Ahmad
March 11th, 2017 at 7:36 am
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kunichiwa

what is the equivalence in Japanese when someone want to ask about more that one item at the same time for an example “What are these?” or what are those?