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Remove batteries from your cell phones (in Japan)!

Planning for the JLPT? Learn about the new JLPT test levels N1, N2, N3, N4, and N5. The JLPT is a goal for many students of the Japanese language - whether for university entrance, a job in Japan, or just personal motivation.

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videovillain
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Location: Kanagawa, Japan
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Re:

Postby videovillain » June 29th, 2013 11:44 pm

jkid wrote:Thats seems very drastic.


They send you all the rules well in advance, and it's a simple rule to follow. If that distraction five minutes before the end the exam happened to be the distraction that became the difference between someone passing or failing, that is unacceptable. I know I'd be extremely upset, especially since the JLPT tests are expensive and only happen twice a year.

Definitely remove your batteries or just don't bring your phone at all
***However, you'll still need a watch of some sort because you are expected to follow the time table).***

community.japanese
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Re: Remove batteries from your cell phones (in Japan)!

Postby community.japanese » July 2nd, 2013 4:12 pm

Hi, everyone! :D
thank you very much for sharing your opinions here with us!

It's very true that any selfish person can disturb you with mobile phone at exams and
that's the worst thing people can do!

Just as information (you might know, though...), you need watch and are allowed to keep your
watch on the desk at exams, but you're not allowed to use mobile for that reason.
Also digital ones which make noise are sometimes not allowed as well.

Natsuko(奈津子),
Team JapanesePod101.com

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cloa513ch2629
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Re:

Postby cloa513ch2629 » July 3rd, 2013 5:38 pm

JohnCBriggs wrote:We got the same type of warnings in the USA. If ANY electronic device makes a noise you will be immediately disqualified. I have a Pocket PC that still alarms when it is off. I had to turn the volume to MUTE to prevent it from sounding. I also deleted all my appointments that occurred during the test time.
Taking the battery out was not a good option because the memory would be lost.
It was a very quiet test.
ジョン

That's totally fair- in deed you should be discouraged from disrupting any other student. Separation of students goes a long towards that but really bad smells should be cause for failure- go to a doctor if you are sick- you should always get special consideration for that.

watertommyz9255
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Re: Remove batteries from your cell phones (in Japan)!

Postby watertommyz9255 » February 16th, 2014 12:23 pm

Oh, I didn't know cellphones could still alarm, even when turned off. That's good to know, if I ever take a test like that. Strange, I've never had mine go off while at the theatre. I believe I have good cellphone etiquette, and would never want to disturb anyone in a test, or at the movies, or even out eating somewhere.

Are you allowed to attempt the test again at a later date?

community.japanese
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Posts: 2704
Joined: November 16th, 2012 5:54 pm

Re: Remove batteries from your cell phones (in Japan)!

Postby community.japanese » February 17th, 2014 5:58 pm

Hello everyone,
If your mobile phone is ringing during a JLPT test, your test result will be invalidated unfortunately.
So don’t forget to turn off that.
Yuki 由紀
Team JapanesePod101.com

Kenjhee
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Re: Remove batteries from your cell phones (in Japan)!

Postby Kenjhee » December 14th, 2016 7:35 pm

I never thought I'd see a red tag for real, much less sit near one, but it happened at the N4 in San Francisco (Dec 2016). About 10 minutes before the end of the first section, the girl sitting next to me had her phone go off like nobody's business. It was a small classroom, and no mistaking where the sound was coming from. The proctor apologized but had to tag her. She actually took it very well, I felt sorry for her.

It sounded like a phone call, not an alert or notification, so I don't know how she managed to have it on. In America it means a whole year to retest. :( :( :(


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