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10 Famous Japanese Movie Quotes

10 famous Japanese movie quotes

Watching Japanese movies with English subtitles can be one of the best ways to improve and keep your Japanese listening and speaking skills tip-top.

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Here are some of the best Japanese movies and TV series, dating from mostly the previous century, to keep you on the edge of your seat. We also give you some of their quotes to memorize, if you choose. If you can’t catch it yourself, why not ask your JapanesePod101 facilitator to translate the quote for you in Japanese! Imagine how impressed your friends will be when you speak like a Japanese native…!

Famous Movies

1. Battle Royale

This futuristic, dystopian Japanese movie was shot in 2000 and was based on an adaptation of a novel with the same name. The book was written by Koushun Takami. The movie’s dense plot revolves around a group of ninth-grade Japanese students who are forced, by government legislation, to kill one another on a deserted island in what is referred to as the ‘Battle Royale’. They are to fight to death, leaving only one victor, or commit suicide. The drama and themes such as betrayal, lost love and friendship keep the movie relatable, but it was still released with a rarely-used R-15 rating in Japan.

The teenagers’ gruelling battle is launched with the class teacher’s chilling words: “So, I would like everyone to kill each other today.”

Watching Movie

2. Merry Christmas, Mr. Lawrence

Released in 1983, this famous human drama, directed by Nagisa Ôshima, is set in a Japanese prison camp during World War II. It centers on the battle of wills between the Japanese camp commander, and the captured British soldiers. One of the captives, John Lawrence, acts as interpreter and attempts to mend the cultural divide between the British and the Japanese. The movie is based on a book by Laurence van der Post, called The Seed and the Sower.

Its title is also its most famous quote, uttered in the bittersweet end by Japanese prisoner Gengo Hara, played by Kitano Takeshi.

Movie Theatre

3. Sailor Suit and Machine Gun

Called one of the defining satirical or comedy-action films of Japanese cinema in the early 80s, the Sailor Suit and Machine Gun tells the story of an average school girl who gets charged to take over her uncle’s yakuza clan. The yakuza are the Japanese equivalent of the mafia. The script was based on a novel by Jiro Akagawa, called Sêrâ-fuku to kikanjû, which was also the film’s original title.

The character is a strong girl called Izumi Hoshi, and she was played by Japanese idol Hiroko Yakushimaru. It is a satirical take on the usually testosterone-fuelled yakuza movies, and its femme fatale wears the traditional Japanese sailor-style school uniform. One of the film’s famous, rather bleak quotes was uttered by Izumi as she shoots her machine gun in front of a crowd: “Feels so good.

4. Otoko wa Tsurai yo aka Am I Trying aka It’s Tough Being a Man

The first of a series, Otoko wa Tsurai yo centres around the antics of the relatable, endearingly-imperfect main character Tora-san, masterfully depicted by actor Kiyoshi Atsumi. It was released in 1969, and directed by Yoji Yamada. The film’s plot is simple enough - Tora-san is a traveling salesman estranged from his family. He returns to the lives of his aunt, uncle and sister after 20 years, and effortlessly wreaks havoc for them. The movie was so popular that a 48-episode TV series was conceived with the same characters.

Some critics say that this film and the subsequent series will inform any viewer of the unique underpinnings of Japanese culture better than any sociology class could.

It’s most famous quote is peppered throughout the series, and roughly translates as: “You shouldn’t say that!” The phrase means, in essence, that ‘if you say that, it’s the end of everything!’ Pure over-the-top comedy.

Movie

5. Lupin the Third, The Mystery of Mamo

Lupin the Third was a manga series that became popular in the late ‘60s, written and illustrated by Monkey Punch. The series relates the adventures of an agile thief, Arséne Lupin, who is the grandson of the well-known French gentleman thief with the same name, from the popular Maurice Leblanc novels. Lupin III comics appeared first in the Weekly Manga Action magazine, and The Mystery of Mamo is the first film in a series of Japanese anime, science fiction, adventure-comedies based on the Lupin III franchise. It remains one of the most popular Japanese anime series worldwide.

The Mystery of Mamo follows the young thief’s antics as he tries to foil Mamo, who is a powerful, rich hermit seeking eternal life. Of course, Lupin also tries throughout the movie to win the heart of his rival and objet d’amour, Fujiko Mine. A quaint quote comes from Inspector Zenigata addressing a thwarted-in-love princess: “That guy stole an irreplaceable thing. Your heart.” He refers to the irresistible Lupin III, naturally.

6. Trick

Trick started as a single TV-series in 2000, the brainchild of director Yukihiko Tsutsumi, and later segued into two more seasons on TV, four movies and three feature-length specials. The plotlines centres on the main character of Naoko Yamada, a young woman who got fired from one job after the other. In her own mind, she’s a talented magician though, so eventually she lands with Professor Ueda, and together the two debunk tales of supernatural phenomena, expose fake spiritualists, and solve mysterious murders and other crimes.

The quote most used in the series and the movies is: “I know what you’ve done!” This is uttered by the triumphant protagonists upon solving a mystery.

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7. Violent Cop

A 1989 film, Violent Cop follows the blood-spattered story of detective Azuma, a Japanese police officer who follows his own head and rules to get results. This loose cannon gets entangled in a drama involving gang-violence, drugs, his close friend and police partner, Iwaki, and his feeble-minded sister, who gets kidnapped.

The film was originally written to be a comedy, but no trace of funny is left in the final product of this very dark, nihilistic crime thriller. One cryptic quote from drug-dealing character, Shinkai about sums up the feeling: “Everybody is crazy”.

8. Onimasa

Another brutal movie, Onimasa, is an epic gangster family melodrama released in 1982, and is sometimes referred to as Onimasa: A Japanese Godfather. The story deals with the life and drama of a crime syndicate boss and his family on Shikoku Island - patriarch Masagaro (aka Onimasa), his wife and their two daughters; one is adopted and called Matsue, and the other daughter is blood related. The film was directed by Hideo Gosha, and won a number of awards, but critics slated it for drawing heavily on the mega-successful The Godfather.

The quote is from Matsue, who exclaims: “Don’t make a fool of me!” She is a striking female lead in the film, whose headstrong, unconventional character somewhat redeems this lengthy movie with its overladen plot. Portrayed as strong-willed and liberal, Matsue stands out in a chauvinistic, male-dominated society.

9. Porco Rosso

The title, Porco Rosso, literally means “crimson pig”, and this is another hugely popular Japanese animated comedy-adventure film, written and directed by Hayao Miyazaki. It was released in 1992, and relates the tale of a World War II ex-Ace pilot who gets cursed and turned into an anthropomorphic pig. He rescues distressed damsels and other victims of kidnapping pirates. The movie was based on Miyazaki’s Hikōtei Jidai or The Age of the Flying Boat.

Porco Rosso stoically and famously says: “A pig who doesn’t fly is just an ordinary pig.”

The Ring

10. Ringu (aka The Ring)

In 1998, a horror movie was quietly released in Japan, and forever changed the face of this genre. Ringu, directed by Hideo Nakata, was soon remade for the English-speaking market as The Ring, and scared the wits out of movie viewers across the globe with its masterful depiction of menacing death approaching slowly. The film follows a female reporter, Reiko Asakawa, and her ex-husband as they chase a story about a killer video - everyone who watches it dies within a week.

This kind of thing… it doesn’t start by one person telling a story. It’s more like everyone’s fear just takes on a life of its own,” is how one of the characters explains the video’s horrific effect to Reiko. Don’t watch it alone.

How Can Watching Japanese Movies and TV Help you Improve your Japanese?

As mentioned in the beginning, watching movies can increase your exposure to native Japanese, and train your ear to the language’s finer nuances. You will be surprised just how much you will learn by watching movies!

To practice your speaking, why not memorize the quotes from these famous Japanese films and TV series. Remember - the more you practice, the closer you’ll come to perfect! At JapanesePod101, we help you reach this goal in fun, effective and easy ways. Practice core vocabulary with learn-on-the-go apps and tools; download thousands of detailed PDF lesson notes, and engage in a lively community of other Japanese language learners and knowledgeable and energetic hosts. Get access to a nearly inexhaustible Lesson Library that allows you to learn the language at the pace that suits you best. Soon you’ll be ready to make your own famous Japanese movie!

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How to Celebrate April Fools’ Day in Japanese

How to Celebrate April Fools' Day in Japanese!

Most everyone is familiar with this day, as it is celebrated nearly everywhere the world. Yet, when exactly is April Fools’ Day? And where did April Fools come from? April Fools’ Day is observed on April 1st every year. This day of jokes and pranks is believed to have stemmed from the 16th-century calendar change in France, when New Year’s Day was moved from April 1 to January 1. This action was taken due to the adoption of the Gregorian calendar.

However, a few people were resistant to the calendar change, so they continued to observe New Year’s Day on April 1st, rather than the new date. They were referred to as the “April Fools”, and others started playing mocking tricks on them. This custom endured, and is practiced to this day around the world!

Table of Contents

  1. Top One Million Words You Need to Know for April Fools’ Day
  2. Japanese Phrases You Can Use on April Fools’ Day
  3. Some of the Coolest April Fools’ Pranks To Play on Anybody
  4. How Can JapanesePod101 Make Your April Fools’ Day Special?
  5. Top 1000 Most Useful Phrases in Japanese - Testing New Technology

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1. Top One Million Words You Need to Know for April Fools’ Day

Do you want to know how to say April Fools’ Day in Japanese? Well, there are millions of ways and words, but here are the top one million Japanese words you really need to know! Simply click this link. Here are some of them you will find useful:

  1. joke - 冗談を言う - jōdan o iu
  2. funny - 面白い - omoshiroi
  3. sneaky - こそこそ - kosokoso
  4. humor - ユーモア - yūmoa
  5. fool - ばか - baka
  6. surprise - 驚かす - odorokasu
  7. prankster - いたずら者 - itazuramono
  8. prank - いたずら - itazura
  9. play a joke - からかう - karakau
  10. lie - うそをつく - uso o tsuku
  11. deceptive - だます - damasu
  12. April 1st - 4月1日 - shi-gatsu tsuitachi

2. Japanese Phrases You Can Use on April Fools’ Day

Japanese Phrases for April Fools' Day

Don’t limit yourself to practical jokes - use these April Fools’ phrases in Japanese to prank your favorite Japanese friend or colleague!

  1. I learned Japanese in 1 month.
    • 1ヶ月で、日本語を習得しました。
    • I-kkagetu de, Nihongo o shūtoku shimashita.
  2. All classes for today got canceled.
    • 今日のクラスはすべてキャンセルになりました。
    • Kyō no kurasu wa subete kyanseru ni narimashita.
  3. I’m sorry, but I’ve just broken your favorite pair of glasses.
    • 申し訳ありません。あなたのお気に入りのメガネを壊してしまいました。
    • Mōshiwake arimasen. Anata no o-ki ni iri no megane o kowashite shimaimashita.
  4. Someone has just hit your car.
    • 今さっき、あなたの車にぶつかっていった人がいました。
    • Ima sakki, anata no kuruma ni butsukatte itta hito ga imashita.
  5. I’m getting married.
    • 結婚します。
    • Kekkon shimasu.
  6. You won a free ticket.
    • 無料チケットが当たりましたよ。
    • Muryō chiketto ga atarimashita yo.
  7. I saw your car being towed.
    • あなたの車がレッカーで移動されていくのを見ました。
    • Anata no kuruma ga rekkā de idō sarete iku no o mimashita.
  8. They’re giving away free gift cards in front of the building.
    • 建物の前で無料のギフトカードを配っています。
    • Tatemono no mae de muryō no gifuto kādo o kubatte imasu.
  9. A handsome guy is waiting for you outside.
    • かっこいい男性が外であなたを待っています。
    • Kakkoī dansei ga soto de anata o matte imasu.
  10. A beautiful lady asked me to give this phone number to you.
    • きれいな女性にこの電話番号を渡してほしいって言われました。
    • Kirei na josei ni kono denwa bangō o watashite hoshī tte iwaremashita.
  11. Can you come downstairs? I have something special for you.
    • ちょっと下の階に来てくれますか。渡したい物があるんです。
    • Chotto shita no kai ni kite kuremasu ka. Watashitai mono ga arundesu.
  12. Thank you for your love letter this morning. I never could have guessed your feelings.
    • 今朝のラブレター、ありがとう。私のことを想ってくれていたなんて思いもしませんでした。
    • Kesa no rabu retā, arigatō. Watashi no koto o omotte kurete ita nante omoi mo shimasen deshita.

Choose your victims carefully, though; the idea is to get them to laugh with you, not to hurt their feelings or humiliate them in front of others. Be extra careful if you choose to play a prank on your boss - you don’t want to antagonize them with an inappropriate joke.

3. Some of the Coolest April Fools’ Pranks To Play on Anybody

Choose Bad or Good

Right, now that you know the top million April Fools’ words in Japanese, let’s look at some super pranks and tricks to play on friends, colleagues and family. Some April Fools ideas never grow old, while new ones are born every year.

Never joke in such a way that it hurts anyone, or humiliates them badly in front of others - the idea is for everybody to laugh and enjoy the fun! Respect is still key, no matter what day of the year it is.

Cockroach prank

1- Infestation

This trick is so simple, yet so creepy, it’s almost unbelievable. Take black paper, cut out the silhouette of a giant cockroach, a spider or another insect, and stick it inside the lampshade of a table lamp. When the lamp is switched on, it will look like a monstrous insect is sitting inside the lampshade. Or, get a whole lot of realistic-looking plastic insects, and spread them over a colleague’s desk and chair, or, at home, over the kids’ beds etc. Creep-factor: stellar.

2- Which One Doesn’t Fit?

Put the photo of a celebrity or a notorious politician in a frame, and take it to work on April Fools’ Day. Hang the photo on the staff picture wall, and wait. You’ll be surprised how long it can take for people to notice that one picture doesn’t fit.

3- Something Weird in the Restroom

At work, replace the air freshener in the restroom with something noxious like insect killer, oven cleaner or your own odious mixture in a spray bottle. Be sure to cover the bottle’s body so no one suspects a swap.

Or paint a bar of soap with clear nail polish, and leave it at the hand wash basin. It will not lather.

Or, if your workplace’s restroom has partitioned toilets with short doors, arrange jeans or trousers and shoes on all but one of the toilet covers, so it looks like every stall is occupied. Now wait for complaints, and see how long it takes for someone to figure out the April Fools’ Day prank. You’ll probably wish you had a camera inside the restroom. But, unless you don’t mind getting fired, don’t put your own recording device in there!

Funny Face

4- Call Me Funny

Prepare and print out a few posters with the following instructions: Lion Roar Challenge! Call this number - XXX XXXXXXX - and leave your best lion’s roar as voicemail! Best roarer will be announced April 10 in the cafeteria. Prize: $100. (Lion’s roar is just an example; you can use any animal call, or even a movie character’s unique sound, such as Chewbacca from Star Wars. The weirder, the funnier. Obviously!) Put the posters up in the office where most of the staff is likely to see them. Now wait for the owner of the number to visit you with murderous intent. Have a conciliatory gift ready that’s not a prank.

5- Minty Cookies

This is another simple but hugely effective prank - simply separate iced cookies, scrape off the icing, and replace it with toothpaste. Serve during lunch or tea break at work, or put in your family’s lunch boxes. Be sure to take photos of your victim’s faces when they first bite into your April Fools’ cookies.

6- Wild Shopping

At your local grocer, place a realistic-looking plastic snake or spider among the fresh vegetables. Now wait around the corner for the first yell.

7- The Oldest Trick in the Book

Don’t forget probably the oldest, yet very effective April Fools’ joke in the book - smearing hand cream or Vaseline on a door handle that most staff, family or friends are likely to use. Yuck to the max!

8- Sneeze On Me

Another golden oldie is also gross, yet harmless and utterly satisfying as a prank. Fill a small spray bottle that you can easily conceal with water. Walk past a friend, colleague or one of your kids, and fake a sneeze while simultaneously spraying them with a bit of water. Expect to be called a totally disgusting person. Add a drop of lovely smelling essential oil to the water for extra confusion.

9- Word Play Repairs

Put a fresh leek in the hand wash basin at home or work, and then tell your housemates or colleagues this: “There’s a huge leak in the restroom/bathroom basin, it’s really serious. Please can someone go have a look?!” Expect exasperation and smiles all around. Note that this prank is only likely to work where people understand English well.

10- Scary Face

Print out a very scary face on an A4 sheet of paper, and place it in a colleague’s, or one of your kid’s drawers, so it’s the first thing they see when they open the drawer. You may not be very popular for a while.

11- Wake Up To Madness

Put foamy shaving cream, or real whipped cream on your hand, and wake your kid up by tickling their nose with it. As long as they get the joke, this could be a wonderful and fun way to start April Fools’ Day.

Computer Prank

12- Computer Prank

This one’s fabulous, if you have a bit of time to fiddle with a colleague, friend or your kid’s computer. It is most effective on a computer where most of the icons they use are on the desktop background itself (as opposed to on the bottom task bar).

Take and save a screenshot of their desktop with the icons. Set this screenshot as their background image. Now delete all the working icons. When they return to their computer, wait for the curses when no amount of clicking on the icons works.

13- Monster Under the Cup

This one will also work well anywhere people meet. Take a paper cup, and write the following on it in black pen: “Danger! Don’t lift, big spider underneath.” Place it upside-down on prominent flat surface, such as a kitchen counter, a colleague’s desk or a restaurant table. Expect some truly interesting responses.

Door Prank

14- Prank Door

Write in large letters on a large and noticeable piece of paper: PUSH. Tape this notice on a door that should be pulled to open, and watch the hilarious struggle of those clever souls who actually read signs.

4. How Can JapanesePod101 Make Your April Fools’ Day Special?

If you happen to visit Japan, or if you work for any Japanese company, knowing the above Japanese prankster phrases can really lighten up your day. Showing you have a sense of humor can go a long way to cement good relationships in any situation. These phrases are at your disposal for free, as well as are these 100 core Japanese words, which you will learn how to pronounce perfectly.

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Also, don’t stop at learning April Fools’ phrases in Japanese - bone up your Japanese language skills with these FREE key phrases. Yes, JapanesePod101 doesn’t joke when it comes to effective, fun and easy learning.

Now, as a bonus, test our super-learning technology, and learn the Top 1000 most useful phrases in Japanese below! But that’s not all. Read on to learn how you can be eligible for large enrollment discounts at JapanesePod101.

5. Top 1000 Most Useful Phrases in Japanese - testing new technology

Help us by being a language guinea pig! Listen to this video above with embedded cutting-edge, frequency-based learning technology that enables you to learn large amounts of data in record time.

  • Note: This technology is in beta-phase of development, and we invite your input for fine-tuning.
  • To participate: Watch the video for instructions, and leave a comment to rate it. Your comment will make you eligible for large enrollment-fee discounts. To watch the video, please click the play button.

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How to Say Happy New Year in Japanese & New Year Wishes

Learn all the Japanese New Year wishes online, in your own time, on any device! Join JapanesePod101 for a special Japanese New Year celebration!

How to Say Happy New Year in Japanese

Can you relate to the year passing something like this: “January, February, March - December!”? Many people do! Quantum physics teaches us that time is relative, and few experiences illustrate this principle as perfectly as when we reach the end of a year. To most of us, it feels like the old one has passed in the blink of an eye, while the new year lies ahead like a very long journey! However, New Year is also a time to celebrate beginnings, and to say goodbye to what has passed. This is true in every culture, no matter when New Year is celebrated.

So, how do you say Happy New Year in Japanese? Let a native teach you! At JapanesePod101, you will learn how to correctly greet your friends over New Year, and wish them well with these Japanese New Year wishes!

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Table of Contents

  1. How to Celebrate New Year in Japan
  2. Must-Know Japanese Words & Phrases for the New Year!
  3. Top 10 New Year’s Resolutions in Japanese
  4. Inspirational New Year Quotes
  5. Inspirational Language Learning Quotes
  6. How To Say Happy New Year in 31 Languages
  7. How JapanesePod101 Can Help You Learn Japanese

But let’s start with some vocabulary for Japanese New Year celebrations, very handy for conversations.

1. How to Celebrate New Year in Japan

On New Year’s Day, the whole world celebrates the start of the year. While the calendar marks only January 1st as a holiday, in Japan we celebrate the period from the 1st to the 3rd, known as 三が日 (Sanganichi). Some companies and stores close during this time, and a number of unique events and customs take place. When you meet someone for the first time in the new year, be sure to greet them with, “明けましておめでとうございます。(Akemashite omedetō gozaimasu!)” That’s Japanese for “Happy New Year!”

You’ll also hear 良いお年を。(Yoi o-toshi o.) at the end of the year and it’s often translated into “Happy New Year!” in English. The difference between 明けましておめでとうございます。 and 良いお年を。is, 良いお年を。is only used before the New Year and 明けましておめでとうございます。 is used in the New Year. 謹賀新年 (きんがしんねん; kingashinnen) means ‘Happy New Year’ too but it’s a written form so you’ll only see it on your 年賀状 (ねんがじょう; nengajou), which is a Japanese New Year’s card.

Now, before we get into more detail, do you know the answer to this question: what do you call the morning of New Year’s Day?

If you don’t already know, you’ll find out a bit later. Keep listening.

New Year’s Day celebrations generally begin with the first sunrise of the year, with people worshiping at homes, the beach, and mountains. 雑煮(zōni) - “rice cakes boiled with vegetables” - and おせち(osechi) dishes - “festive New Year’s food” — are eaten on New Year’s Day. 雑煮 (zōni) is a soup containing rice cakes, the seasoning of which depends on the family and region. There’s a saying that goes, “Just like a rice cake stretches, so shall one’s lifespan.” So, this soup is eaten with the hope for longevity. おせち(osechi) dishes are also eaten with the wish of having a happy and safe year. In order to seek blessings for the year, families and friends wear their finest clothes and visit a shrine.

In Japan, it’s customary to send New Year’s cards to friends or acquaintances who have helped you in the previous year. In the cards, we write greetings and hopes for the year, as well as information on how the person or family is getting along. A picture of an animal representing the zodiac sign for the new year is also included. In the past, people would either visit the homes of their acquaintances, or receive acquaintances as guests in their homes with the New Year’s custom called お年始 (o-nenshi). This custom has been simplified gradually to the point where only greeting cards are exchanged.

Children receive お年玉 (o-toshidama), meaning “New Year’s gifts” from their parents, grandparents, relatives, and parents’ friends. The traditional gift is money. Since this only happens at New Year, children get very excited about it. お年玉 (o-toshidama) are placed into a paper envelope called an お年玉袋 (o-toshidama bukuro). The average amount given to an elementary school-aged child is around 3,000 to 5,000 yen. As they grow older, middle school-aged children receive around 5,000 yen, and those in high school receive around 10,000 yen.

Here’s our fun fact for the day! Did you know that while people go to a shrine to pray during New Year’s Day, some visit the shrine at midnight as time passes from the previous year to the New Year? This practice of making a midnight visit is called 二年参り(ninen-mairi).

Now it’s time to answer our quiz question: what do you call the morning of New Year’s Day?

The correct answer is 元旦 (gantan). Two characters form this word. The second character, 旦 (tan), is made up of the character for “sun,” with a single horizontal line drawn under it. With these pictographs combined, the character represents the sun rising over the horizon. And taken together, the two characters 元旦 (gantan) represent the morning of January 1st.

Happy New Year!
明けましておめでとうございます。
Akemashite omedetō gozaimasu!

2. Must-Know Japanese Words & Phrases for the New Year!

Japanese Words & Phrases for the New Year

1- Year


toshi

This is pretty self-explanatory. Most countries follow a Gregorian calendar, which has approximately 365 days in a year, while in some cultures, other year designations are also honored. Therefore, New Year’s day in Japan could fall on a different day than in your country. When do you celebrate New Year?

2- Midnight

真夜中
mayonaka

The point in time when a day ends and a new one starts. Many New Year celebrants prefer to stay awake till midnight, and greet the new annum as it breaks with fanfare and fireworks!

3- New Year’s Day

元日
Ganjitsu

In most countries, the new year is celebrated for one whole day. On the Gregorian calendar, this falls on January 1st. On this day, different cultures engage in festive activities, like parties, parades, big meals with families and many more.

4- Party

パーティ
pāti

A party is most people’s favorite way to end the old year, and charge festively into the new one! We celebrate all we accomplished in the old year, and joyfully anticipate what lies ahead.

5- Dancing

踊り
odori

Usually, when the clock strikes midnight and the New Year officially begins, people break out in dance! It is a jolly way to express a celebratory mood with good expectations for the year ahead. Also, perhaps, that the old year with its problems has finally passed! Dance parties are also a popular way to spend New Year’s Eve in many places.

6- Champagne

シャンパン
shanpan

Originating in France, champagne is a bubbly, alcoholic drink that is often used to toast something or someone during celebrations.

7- Fireworks

花火
hanabi

These are explosives that cause spectacular effects when ignited. They are popular for announcing the start of the new year with loud noises and colorful displays! In some countries, fireworks are set off to scare away evil spirits. In others, the use of fireworks is forbidden in urban areas due to their harmful effect on pets. Most animals’ hearing is much more sensitive than humans’, so this noisy display can be very frightful and traumatising to them.

8- Countdown

カウントダウン
kaunto daun

This countdown refers to New Year celebrants counting the seconds, usually backward, till midnight, when New Year starts - a great group activity that doesn’t scare animals, and involves a lot of joyful shouting when the clock strikes midnight!

9- New Year’s Holiday

正月
shōgatsu

In many countries, New Year’s Day is a public holiday - to recuperate from the party the previous night, perhaps! Families also like to meet on this day to enjoy a meal and spend time together.

10- Confetti

紙吹雪
kamifubuki

In most Western countries, confetti is traditionally associated with weddings, but often it is used as a party decoration. Some prefer to throw it in the air at the strike of midnight on New Year’s Eve.

11- New Year’s Eve

大晦日
ōmisoka

This is the evening before New Year breaks at midnight! Often, friends and family meet for a party or meal the evening before, sometimes engaging in year-end rituals. How are you planning to give your New Year greetings in 2018?

12- Toast

乾杯
kanpai

A toast is a type of group-salutation that involves raising your glass to drink with others in honor of something or someone. A toast to the new year is definitely in order!

13- Resolution

決意
ketsui

Those goals or intentions you hope to, but seldom keep in the new year! Many people consider the start of a new year to be the opportune time for making changes or plans. Resolutions are those intentions to change, or the plans. It’s best to keep your resolutions realistic so as not to disappoint yourself!

14- Parade

パレード
parēdo

New Year celebrations are a huge deal in some countries! Parades are held in the streets, often to celebratory music, with colorful costumes and lots of dancing. Parades are like marches, only less formal and way more fun. At JapanesePod101, you can engage in forums with natives who can tell you what Japanese New Year celebrations are like!

3. Top 10 New Year’s Resolutions

So, you learned the Japanese word for ‘resolution’. Fabulous! Resolutions are those goals and intentions that we hope to manifest in the year that lies ahead. The beginning of a new year serves as a good marker in time to formalise these. Some like to do it in writing, others only hold these resolutions in their hearts. Here are our Top 10 New Year’s resolutions at JapanesePod101 - what are yours?

Learn these phrases and impress your Japanese friends with your vocabulary.

New Year's Resolutions

1- Read more

本をたくさん読む。
Hon o takusan yomu.

Reading is a fantastic skill that everyone can benefit from. You’re a business person? Apparently, successful business men and women read up to 60 books a year. This probably excludes fiction, so better scan your library or Amazon for the top business reads if you plan to follow in the footsteps of the successful! Otherwise, why not make it your resolution to read more Japanese in the new year? You will be surprised by how much this will improve your Japanese language skills!

2- Spend more time with family

家族と多くの時間を過ごす。
Kazoku to ōku no jikan o sugosu.

Former US President George Bush’s wife, Barbara Bush, was quoted as having said this: “At the end of your life, you will never regret not having passed one more test, not winning one more verdict, or not closing one more deal. You will regret time not spent with a husband, a friend, a child, a parent.” This is very true! Relationships are often what gives life meaning, so this is a worthy resolution for any year.

3- Lose weight

やせる。
Yaseru.

Hands up, how many of you made this new year’s resolution last year too…?! This is a notoriously difficult goal to keep, as it takes a lot of self discipline not to eat unhealthily. Good luck with this one, and avoid unhealthy fad diets!

4- Save money

お金を貯める。
O-kane o tameru.

Another common and difficult resolution! However, no one has ever been sorry when they saved towards reaching a goal. Make it your resolution to save money to upgrade your subscription to JapanesePod101’s Premium PLUS option in the new year - it will be money well spent!

5- Quit smoking

禁煙する。
Kin’ensuru.

This is a resolution that you should definitely keep, or your body could punish you severely later! Smoking is a harmful habit with many hazardous effects on your health. Do everything in your power to make this resolution come true in the new year, as your health is your most precious asset.

6- Learn something new

習い事を始める。
Naraigoto o hajimeru.

Science has proven that learning new skills can help keep brain diseases such as dementia and Alzheimer’s at bay! It can even slow down the progression of the disease. So, keep your brain healthy by learning to speak a new language, studying towards a qualification, learning how to sew, or how to play chess - no matter how old you are, the possibilities are infinite!

7- Drink less

お酒の量を減らす。
O-sake no ryō o herasu.

This is another health resolution that is good to heed any time of the year. Excessive drinking is associated with many diseases, and its effect can be very detrimental to good relationships too. Alcohol is a poison and harmful for the body in large quantities!

8- Exercise regularly

運動の習慣を身につける。
Undō no shūkan o minitsukeru.

This resolution goes hand-in-hand with ‘Lose weight’! An inactive body is an unhealthy and often overweight one, so give this resolution priority in the new year.

9- Eat healthy

健康的な食生活を心がける。
Kenkō-teki na shokuseikatsu o kokorogakeru.

If you stick with this resolution, you will lose weight and feel better in general. It is a very worthy goal to have!

10- Study Japanese with JapanesePod101

JapanesePod101.comで日本語を勉強するつもりです。
Japanīzu poddo ichi maru ichi dotto komu de Nihongo o benkyō suru tsumori desu.

Of course! You can only benefit from learning Japanese, especially with us! Learning how to speak Japanese can keep your brain healthy, it can widen your circle of friends, and improve your chances to land a dream job anywhere in the world. JapanesePod101 makes it easy and enjoyable for you to stick to this resolution.

4. Inspirational New Year Quotes

Inspirational Quotes

Everyone knows that it is sometimes very hard to stick to resolutions, and not only over New Year. The reasons for this vary from person to person, but all of us need inspiration every now and then! A good way to remain motivated is to keep inspirational quotes near as reminders that it’s up to us to reach our goals.

Click here for quotes that will also work well in a card for a special Japanese new year greeting!

Make decorative notes of these in Japanese, and keep them close! Perhaps you could stick them above your bathroom mirror, or on your study’s wall. This way you not only get to read Japanese incidentally, but also remain inspired to reach your goals! Imagine feeling like giving up on a goal, but reading this quote when you go to the bathroom: “It does not matter how slowly you go, as long as you do not stop.” What a positive affirmation!

5. Inspirational Language Learning Quotes

Language Learning Quotes

Still undecided whether you should enroll with JapanesePod101 to learn a new language? There’s no time like the present to decide! Let the following Language Learning Quotes inspire you with their wisdom.

Click here to read the most inspirational Language Learning Quotes!

As legendary President Nelson Mandela once said: “If you talk to a man in a language he understands, that goes to his head. If you talk to him in his own language, that goes to his heart.” So, learning how to say Happy New Year in Japanese could well be a way into someone special’s heart for you! Let this year be the one where you to learn how to say Happy New Year, and much more, in Japanese - it could open many and unexpected doors for you.

6. How To Say Happy New Year in 31 Languages

Here’s a lovely bonus for you! Why stop with Japanese - learn how to say Happy New Year in 31 other languages too! Watch this video and learn how to pronounce these New Year’s wishes like a native in under two minutes.

7. Why Enrolling with JapanesePod101 Would Be the Perfect New Year’s Gift to Yourself!

If you are unsure how to celebrate the New Year, why not give yourself a huge gift, and enroll to learn Japanese! With more than 12 years of experience behind us, we know that JapanesePod101 would be the perfect fit for you. There are so many reasons for this!

Learning Paths

  • Custom-tailored Learning Paths: Start learning Japanese at the level that you are. We have numerous Learning Pathways, and we tailor them just for you based on your goals and interests! What a boon!
  • Marked Progress and Fresh Learning Material Every Week: We make new lessons available every week, with an option to track your progress. Topics are culturally appropriate and useful, such as “Learning how to deliver negative answers politely to a business partner.” Our aim is to equip you with Japanese that makes sense!
  • Multiple Learning Tools: Learn in fun, easy ways with resources such 1,000+ video and audio lessons, flashcards, detailed PDF downloads, and mobile apps suitable for multiple devices!
  • Fast Track Learning Option: If you’re serious about fast-tracking your learning, Premium Plus would be the perfect way to go! Enjoy perks such as personalised lessons with ongoing guidance from your own, native-speaking teacher, and one-on-one learning on your mobile app! You will not be alone in your learning. Weekly assignments with non-stop feedback, answers and corrections will ensure speedy progress.
  • Fun and Easy: Keeping the lessons fun and easy-to-learn is our aim, so you will stay motivated by your progress!

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There’s no reason not to go big in 2018 by learning Japanese with JapanesePod101. Just imagine how the world can open up for you!

How to Say ‘Merry Christmas’ in Japanese

How to Say Merry Christmas in Japanese

Do you know any ways to wish someone a ‘Merry Christmas’ in Japanese? JapanesePod101 brings you easy-to-learn translations and the correct pronunciation of Japanese Christmas phrases!

Christmas is the annual commemorative festival of Christ’s birth in the Western Christian Church. It takes place on December 25th and is usually celebrated with much food and fanfare! However, not all cultures celebrate Christmas. In some countries, Christmas is not even a public holiday! However, many countries have adapted Christmas and its religious meaning to tally with their own beliefs, or simply in acknowledgment of the festival’s importance to other cultures. If you want to impress native Japanese speakers with culturally-appropriate Christmas phrases and vocabulary, JapanesePod101 will teach you the most important ways to wish someone a ‘Merry Christmas’ in Japanese!

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Table of Contents

  1. How to Celebrate Christmas in Japan
  2. Holiday Greetings and Wishes
  3. Must-Know Christmas Day Vocabulary
  4. Twelve Days of Christmas
  5. Top 10 Christmas Characters
  6. How JapanesePod101 Can Help You

1. How to Celebrate Christmas in Japan

Christmas Words in Japanese

As everyone knows, Christmas is a holiday that celebrates the birth of Jesus Christ. In Japan, this holiday is a major event but does not have any religious association. Instead, it’s celebrated with secular traditions. The day is an especially happy one for children, who receive a present from Santa Claus.

Now, before we go into more detail, do you know the answer to this question: when did Christmas come to be recognized in Japan?
If you don’t already know, you’ll find out a bit later.

From the start of November, cities are adorned with Christmas trees and Christmas sales begin. It’s a happy time when people choose presents for their family, friends, and partners. The stores play a never-ending selection of Christmas songs, which helps to excite the hearts of the shoppers. Department stores, bakeries, and convenience stores often sell Christmas cakes. A wide variety of Christmas cakes are sold, ranging from the ever-popular strawberry and fresh cream cake, all the way to some quite elaborate versions. Some places accept orders from October. Also, sales of chicken increase at Christmas. Trees on the streets are decorated with LED lights that beautifully illuminate the nights of midwinter.

On Christmas Eve, children place a stocking by their bed and are excited to wake up the following morning to find a present left by Santa Claus. Parents prepare in advance by asking their children what kind of toy they would like.

At Christmas, more and more Japanese are enjoying a Christmas dinner at home with their family rather than eating out. Single people often eat dinner with their friends or partner, and they exchange gifts and hold parties. Among the younger generation, there is tendency for people to spend a romantic Christmas with their boyfriend or girlfriend.

Here’s our fun fact for the day! Do you know what the most famous Japanese Christmas song is? It’s no exaggeration to say that the most famous song is “Christmas Eve” by 山下達郎 (Tatsuro Yamashita). It’s a popular song in which the lyrics speak of lovers unable to meet on Christmas Eve.

Now it’s time to answer the quiz question: when was Christmas recognized in Japan?

The correct answer is the Meiji era, beginning in the late 19th century. 明治屋 (Meiji-Ya) is a food import company that established a branch in Ginza and held one of the first Christmas sales there. Because of this, celebrating Christmas became more widespread. With each passing year, Christmas becomes more and more of a major annual event, and perhaps could be considered one of the most fun occasions for the Japanese.

2. Holiday Greetings and Wishes for the Holiday Season

Holiday Greetings and Wishes

1- Merry Christmas!

メリークリスマス!
Merīkurisumasu!

Do you know how to say ‘Merry Christmas’ in Japanese? Learn here how to pronounce it perfectly! ‘Merry’ means to be joyful, to celebrate and generally be in good spirits. So, with this phrase you are wishing someone a joyful, celebratory remembrance of Christ’s birth!

2- Happy Kwanzaa!

クワンザおめでとう!
Kuwanza omedetō!

Surprise your African-American, or West African native friends with this phrase over the Christmas holidays! Kwanzaa is a seven-day, non-religious celebration, starting on Dec 26th each year. It has its roots in African American modern history, and many people celebrate both Kwanzaa and Christmas!

3- Have a happy New Year!

良いお年を。
Yoi o-toshi o.

In countries where Christmas is not officially celebrated, but a Gregorian calendar is observed, this would be a friendly festive-season wish over New Year.

4- Happy Hanukkah!

ハヌーカおめでとう!
Hanūka omedetō!

Hanukkah is the beautiful Hebrew festival over November or December each year. It is also called the ‘Festival of Lights’ and is celebrated to commemorate the Jewish freedom of religion.

5- Have a great winter vacation!

良い冬休みを!
Ī fuyu yasumi o!

This is a good phrase to keep handy if someone doesn’t observe any religious festival over the Christmas holidays! However, this will only be applicable in the Northern hemisphere, where it is winter over Christmas.

6- See you next year!

また来年!
Mata rainen!

Going away on holiday over Christmas season, or saying goodbye to someone about to leave on vacation? This would be a good way to say goodbye to your friends and family.

7- Warm wishes!

ご多幸をお祈りしています。
Go-takō o oinori shite imasu.

An informal, friendly phrase to write in Japanese Christmas cards, especially for secular friends who prefer to observe Christmas celebrations without the religious symbolism. It conveys the warmth of friendship and friendly wishes associated with this time of year.

8- Happy holidays!

良い休暇を!
Ī kyūka o!

If you forget how to say ‘Merry Christmas!’ in Japanese, this is a safe, generic phrase to use instead.

9- Enjoy the holidays!

休暇を楽しんでね!
Kyūka o tanoshinde ne!

After saying ‘Merry Christmas’ in Japanese, this would be a good phrase with which to wish Christmas holiday-goers well! It is also good to use for secular friends who don’t celebrate Christmas but take a holiday at this time of the year.

10- Best wishes for the New Year!

新年が良い年でありますように。
Shin’nen ga yoi toshi de arimasu yō ni.

This is another way of wishing someone well in the New Year if they observe a Gregorian calendar. New Year’s day would then fall on January 1st.

3. Must-Know Christmas Day Vocabulary

Christmas is associated with many traditions and religious symbols in multiple countries across the world. It originated centuries ago in the West with the birth of Christianity, and the celebrations are often embedded with rich cultural significance. So, by now you know how to say Merry Christmas in Japanese! Next, learn pertinent vocabulary and phrases pertaining to Christmas, as well as how to pronounce them correctly. At JapanesePod101, we make sure you sound like a native speaker!

1- Christmas

クリスマス
Kurisumasu

This is the Japanese word for ‘Christmas’. Most happy Christmas wishes in Japanese will include this word!

2- Snow


yuki

In most Northern-hemisphere countries, Christmas is synonymous with snow, and for Christmas, the snowman is often dressed as Santa Claus.

3- Snowflake

雪の結晶
yuki no kesshō

Snowflakes collectively make up snow. A single snowflake is small, white, light like a feather and icy cold! When put under a microscope, the snowflake reveals itself to have the most beautiful, symmetrical patterns. These patterns have become popular Christmas decorations, especially in Western countries.

4- Snowman

雪だるま
yukidaruma

As you guessed - a snowman is only possible to build if it is snowing! What a fun way to spend Christmas day outside.

5- Turkey

七面鳥
shichimenchō

Roast turkey is the traditional main dish on thousands of lunch tables on Christmas day, mainly in Western countries. What is your favorite Christmas dish?

6- Wreath

リース
rīsu

Another traditional Western decoration for Christmas, the wreath is an arrangement of flowers, leaves, or stems fastened in a ring. Many families like to hang a Christmas wreath outside on their houses’ front doors.

7- Reindeer

トナカイ
tonakai

Reindeer are the animals commonly fabled to pull Santa Claus’ sled across the sky! Western Christmas folklore tells of Father Christmas or Santa Claus doing the rounds with his sled, carrying Christmas presents for children, and dropping them into houses through the chimney. But who is Santa Claus?

8- Santa Claus

サンタクロース
Santa Kurōsu

Santa Claus is a legendary and jolly figure originating in the Western Christian culture. He is known by many names, but is traditionally depicted as a rotund man wearing a red costume with a pointy hat, and sporting a long, snow-white beard!

9- Elf

妖精
yōsei

An elf is a supernatural creature of folklore with pointy ears, a dainty, humanoid body and a capricious nature. Elves are said to help Santa Claus distribute presents to children over Christmas!

10- Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer

赤鼻のトナカイ
akahana no tonakai

‘Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer’ is a Christmas song based on an American children’s story book with the same name. Rudolph is one of Santa’s reindeer. The song became more famous than the book, and can still be heard playing in many shopping malls over Christmas time across the globe!

11- North Pole

北極
hokkyoku

The cold North Pole is where Santa Claus is reputed to live with his reindeer!

12- Sled

そり
sori

A sled is a non-motorised land vehicle used to travel over snow in countries where it snows a lot, and is usually pulled by animals such as horses, dogs or reindeer. This one obviously refers to Santa’s sled! Another word for sled is sleigh or sledge.

13- Present

プレゼント
purezento

Gift or present giving is synonymous with Christmas Eve and the greatest source of joy for children over this festive time! This tradition signifies that Christ’s birth was a gift to mankind, but not all people who hand out presents over Christmas observe the religious meaning.

14- Bell


suzu

On Christmas Day, or Christmas Eve, many religious celebrants enjoy going to church for a special sermon and Christmas rituals. The start of the sermon is often announced with bells or a bell, if the church has one. For this reason, the sound of ringing bells is often associated with Christmas Day.

15- Chimney

煙突
entotsu

The chimney is the entrance Santa Claus uses to deliver children’s presents on Christmas Day, according to folklore! Wonder how the chubby man and his elves stay clean…?!

16- Fireplace

暖炉
danro

In most countries where it snows, Christmas is synonymous with a fire or burning embers in houses’ fireplaces. Families huddle around its warmth while opening Christmas presents. Also, this is where Santa Claus is reputed to pop out after his journey down the chimney!

17- Christmas Day

クリスマス
Kurisumasu

This is the official day of commemorative celebration of Christ’s birth, and falls each year on December 25.

18- Decoration

装飾 装飾
sōshoku

Decorations are the colourful trinkets and posters that make their appearance in shops and homes during the Christmas holiday season in many countries! They give the places a celebratory atmosphere in anticipation of the big Christmas celebration. Typical Christmas decorations include colorful photographs and posters, strings of lights, figurines of Santa Claus and the nativity scene, poinsettia flowers, snowflakes and many more.

19- Stocking

靴下
kutsushita

According to legend, Santa Claus places children’s presents in a red stocking hanging over the fireplace. This has also become a popular decoration, signifying Christmas.

20- Holly

ヒイラギ
hiiragi

Holly is a shrub native to the UK, and parts of Europe, Africa and Asia. It is characterised by glossy, spiny-toothed leaves, small, whitish flowers, and red berries. Ironically, its significance for Christmas relates to Christ’s crucifixion and suffering rather than his birth. However, the leaves’ distinctive shape and image have become popular Christmas decorations.

21- Gingerbread house

ジンジャーブレッド・ハウス
jinjābureddo hausu

According to legend, the gingerbread house synonymous with Christmas is related to Christ’s birth place, Bethlehem. Bethlehem literally means ‘House of Bread’. Over centuries, it has become a popular treat over Christmas time in many non-religious households as well.

22- Candy cane

キャンディケイン
kyandī kein

According to folklore, Christmas candy canes made their appearance first in Germany in the 16th century. A choir master gave children the candy canes to suck on in church in order to keep them quiet during the Christmas sermon! Apparently, the candy is shaped like a cane in remembrance of the shepherds who were the first to visit the baby Jesus. Today, like gingerbread houses, they are still a popular sweet over the festive season!

23- Mistletoe

ヤドリギ
yadorigi

Mistletoe is a parasitic plant that grows on certain trees. In the Middle Ages, it was believed that the mistletoe has magical powers, and could protect a household from evil if hung above a door during December. The belief didn’t last but the habit did, and the mistletoe is another popular Christmas decoration!

4. Twelve Days of Christmas

Twelve Days of Christmas

Wow, you’re doing extremely well! You know how to wish someone a Merry Christmas in Japanese, and you learned pertinent vocabulary too! The Twelve Days of Christmas is not very well known in modern times, so, you’re on your way to becoming an expert in Christmas traditions and rituals. Well done!

The Twelve Days of Christmas, also known as Twelvetide, is a traditional festive period of 12 days dedicated to celebrate the nativity of Christ. Christmas Day is, for many who observe Twelvetide, the first day of this period.

‘The Twelve Days of Christmas’ is also a popular Christmas song about a series of gifts given on each day of Twelvetide. According to experts, these gifts were created as a coded reference to important symbols in the Christian church. Here is a list of those gifts mentioned in the song! Do you recognise them?

5. Top 10 Christmas Characters in American Culture

Top 10 Christmas Characters

This is fantastic, you know how to explain almost everything about Christmas in Japanese! However, do you know the most popular Christmas characters in American culture? Your knowledge will not be complete without this list.

6. JapanesePod101 Is One Of The Best Online Language Schools Available!

Visit JapanesePod101!

We don’t just say this - we can prove it! Geared to your personal needs and goals, we have several learning paths from which to choose. From Japanese for Absolute Beginners to Advanced Japanese, lessons are designed to meet you where you are, and increase your language abilities in fun, easy and interactive lessons! Mastering a new language has never been this easy or enjoyable.

We have over a decade of experience and research behind us, and it shows! With thousands of audio and video lessons, detailed PDF lessons and notes, as well as friendly, knowledgeable hosts, JapanesePod101 is simply unbeatable when it comes to learning correct Japanese. Plenty of tools and resources are available when you study with us. New lessons are added every week so material remains fresh and relevant. You also have the option to upgrade and enjoy even more personalised guidance and services. This is a sure way to fast-track your learning!

So, this Christmas, why don’t you give yourself a present and enroll in JapanesePod101? Or give an enrollment as a present to a loved one. It will be a gift with benefits for a whole lifetime, not just over Christmas!

How to Learn Japanese Through Fairy Tale Stories

Top 6 Japanese Fairy Tale Stories and Characters

Hi Listeners,

Do you know what the top 6 Japanese fairy tales are?

Reading short stories in Japanese is a fun way to learn the Japanese language and culture. Check out the 6 Japanese fairy tale stories below and learn must-know folk story words and phrases in Japanese!

1. Top 6 Japanese Fairy Tales

Top 6 Japanese Fairy Tales

1. Momotarō, the Peach Boy

The Japanese title is 桃太郎 (ももたろう; Momotarō). Born from a peach and raised by an old couple, Momotaro grows into a strong boy and starts fighting evil creatures. He is a symbol of bravery and humility.

2. The Crane of Gratitude

The Japanese title is 鶴の恩返し (つるのおんがえし; Tsuru no on-gaeshi). An old man frees a crane and later takes in a young woman. Behind closed doors, she turns into a crane and makes beautiful cloth out of her feathers.

3. The Rollong Rice-balls

The Japanese title is おむすびころりん (Omusubi kororin). A kind man drops his rice-ball and follows it down a hole into the mouse world. He’s rewarded, but when a mean-spirited man tries the same, he is punished.

4. The Inch-High Samurai

The Japanese title is 一寸法師 (いっすんぼうし; Issun bōshi). A boy who is only an inch tall protects a noblewoman from a demon. He’s swallowed by the demon and fights his way out from the inside.

5. The Story of Urashimatarō

The Japanese title is 浦島太郎 (うらしまたろう; Urashimatarō). A fisherman is taken to the Dragon Palace under the sea. He stays for 3 days, but when he returns to the surface, 300 years have passed.

6. Bamboo Hat for the Jizō Statuettes

The Japanese title is かさじぞう (Kasa jizō). A man goes to market to get mochi to celebrate New Year’s but gives his hats to the jizou. Later they reward his kindness.

2. Fairy Tale Characters and Words in Japanese

Here are some common fairy tale characters and words in Japanese you may come across while reading Japanese folktale stories.

Japanese Romaji Meaning
妖精 yōsei fairy
ユニコーン yunikōn unicorn
shiro castle
マジック majikku magic
魔女 majo witch
スペル superu spell
ドラゴン doragon dragon
オーガ Ōga Ogre
王様 ō-sama king
王子 ōji prince
王女 ōjo princess
昔々 mukashi mukashi once upon a time
魔法使い mahō tsukai wizard
人魚 ningyo mermaid
巨人 kyojin giant
こびと kobito dwarf
ままはは mamahaha stepmother

Check out even more fairy tale words in the video below!

Conclusion

You might not understand every single word in Japanese stories at first but try to guess what they mean in context. Illustrations will also help you understand the story. After reading it, make sure to look up the words in the dictionary and read the story a few more times. If you do that, you’ll surely get better at reading Japanese.

So what Japanese tale would you like to read first? Do you know any other fairy tale stories in Japan? Did we miss any Japanese fairy tale words? Let us know in the comments!

Writing a Japanese Address on a Postcard

  1. - Postal symbol, preceding postal code
  2. 107-0052 - Postal code, composed of 7 numbers
  3. 東京都 - Prefecture (県, ken), with the exception of Tokyo (都, to), Hokkaido (道, do) and Osaka/Kyoto (府, fu)
  4. 港区 - Municipality, city (市, shi), village (村, mura) or ward (区, ku). Here it is Minato ward.
  5. 赤坂 - Area. Here it is Akasaka.
  6. 3丁目4-4 - City district (丁目, chome), city block (番地, banchi), bldg/house number (号, go)
  7. ジョン シナ - Recipient’s name. In Japan the last name precedes the first name and is often followed by a honorific suffix like San (さん) or Sama (様), corresponding to Mr. or Ms.

Click here to learn how to send out a Japanese postcard with our fun FREE video!


P.S. Win a personal postcard all the way from Japan! Just click the link above and submit your name and email address :) Hurry! Contest ends this Friday, 10/14/2016!

How to Cook Delicious Chicken Teriyaki While Learning Japanese

Do you like chicken teriyaki? If so, this blog post is perfect for you. In this lesson, you’re going to learn an easy way to cook delicious chicken teriyaki while learning Japanese. Check out 鶏のテリヤキのレシピ (Tori no teriyaki no reshipi; chicken teriyaki recipe) below! Make sure to listen to the audio lesson and review the words and phrases too!

Cook Chicken Teryaki While Learning Japanese

Listen to our Japanese audio lesson - How to Make Japanese Teriyaki Chicken!



1. What’s teriyaki?

Teriyaki (テリヤキ) is one of the most well-known and popular cooking methods in Japanese cuisine. Fish or meat (or other types of ingredients) are marinated in sweet soy sauce and then grilled or broiled. We can write teriyaki in kanji (照り焼き), hiragana, or katakana.



2. Ingredients (材料; Zairyō)

  • One piece of chicken (鶏肉1枚; Toriniku ichi-mai)
  • Fifty milliliters of soy saucee (しょうゆ50cc; Shōyu gojū-cc)
  • Fifty millliters of vinegar (酢50cc; Su gojū-cc)
  • Thirty grams of sugar (砂糖30グラム; Satō sanjū-guramu)

Teriyaki Rice

Learn more Japanese vocabulary about cooking!

Let’s make Japanese chicken teriyaki! Do you have your ingredients? So let’s begin making it.
鶏のテリヤキを作りましょう!材料はありますか。では、作り始めましょう。
(Tori no teriyaki o tsukurimashō! Aairyō wa arimasu ka. Dewa, tsukuri hajimemashō.)



3. How to Make Simple Teriyaki Sauce & Chicken Teriyaki

Learn more Japanese vocabulary about kitchen items!

1) Mix together the soy sauce, the vinegar, and the sugar.

  • しょうゆと、酢と、砂糖を混ぜてください。
  • Shōyu to, su to, satō o mazete kudasai.

2) Keep mixing until the sugar dissolves.

  • 砂糖が溶けるまで、混ぜ続けてくださいね。
  • Satō ga tokeru made, mazetsudukete kudasai ne.

3) Next, put the mixture and the chicken in the pan. Then turn on the heat.

  • 次に、鍋にたれと鶏肉をいれます。それから、火をつけてください。
  • Tsugi ni, nabe ni tare to toriniku o iremasu. Sore kara, hi o tsukete kudasai.

4) When it’s boiling, turn down the flame. Let it cook for ten minutes.

  • お湯が沸騰したら、火を弱くしてください。10分間煮てください。
  • O-yu ga futtō shitara, hi o yowaku shite kudasai.

5) Turn it over and let it cook for another ten minutes.

  • ひっくり返して、また10分煮てください。
  • Hikkuri kaeshite, mata juppun nite kudasai.


4. Japanese Vocabulary and Phrases

Biling Water

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  • テリヤキ (teriyaki): teriyaki
  • 経つ (tatsu): to pass (time); V1
  • 煮る (niru): to cook, to boil, to simmer;V2
  • 沸騰 (futtō): boiling
  • (nabe): pot, saucepan
  • 溶ける (とける): to melt, to thaw;V2
  • たれ (tare): sauce, dipping sauce
  • (su): vinegar
  • しょうゆ (shōyu): soy sauce
  • ひっくり返す (hikkuri kaesu): to turn over, to upset;V1


5. Japanese Audio Lesson


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In this lesson, you will learn how to use hajimeru, tuzukeru, and owaru in Japanese. The conversation takes place in a home economics class at school between a Japanese teacher and some students. The teacher is speaking formal Japanese to her students. The students are speaking formal Japanese with their teacher and informal Japanese to each other. We will also discuss Japanese cooking teriyaki style.
JapanesePod101 Audio Lesson

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Japanese Honorifics Guide: San, Kun, Chan, Sama and More

Have you ever felt confused about all those -kun, -chan and -senpai you hear when watching anime? I am sure you have wondered about the meaning of these Japanese suffixes. After reading this post your Japanese will sound more natural as you will learn how to use Japanese honorifics!

japanese family honorifics suffixes

Remember to take the quiz at the end to test your understanding and to sign up at JapanesePod101.com if you really want to learn Japanese with effective resources.

japanese honorifics suffixes san kun chan sama sensei senpai kouhai

Most languages use them: “Mr.”, “Mrs”, “Sir”, “Dr”… But in Japanese, there are more of them, and they are a lot more nuanced. They are often attached to a name as a suffix, but some can stand alone, such as sensei.

In Japanese there are both formal and informal honorifics, plus some familial honorifics. The use of honorifics is considered very important in Japan, and calling somebody by just his name without adding a title is a lack of good manners.

Here is the list of 10 Japanese honorific titles and how to use them!

-San (さん), the most common honorific, equivalent to “Mr.” or “Mrs.” It’s a title of respect between equals, so it’s okay to use for anyone, especially if you are not sure which honorific to use. It can also be attached to occupation names. For example, ‘bookstore (本屋) + san (さん) = “bookseller” (本屋さん).’

-Kun (くん), the most commonly used honorific in anime. It is used to address young males. It is also used by superiors to inferiors and male of the same age and status.

-Chan (ちゃん), most frequently used for girls and between them, children, close friends, or lovers. This can be used when somebody finds a person, a pet, or something adorable and cute. You don’t want to use it with a superior, unless you want to be fired! -Sama (さま), the more formal version of san. Usually used to refer to customers who are deserving of the utmost respect status in Japan, people of higher rank, or somebody you admire.

japanese family honorifics suffixes

-Niisan/Neesan (兄さん / 姉さん), is used when referring to one’s older brother or sister, or any relative or close friend. -Jiisan/Baasan (じいさん / ばあさん), s used when referring to one’s grandfather and grandmother, and is also used to refer to older adults the speaker is acquainted with. Neither of these are seen as insulting, but watch out not to use them with a person sensitive about his/her age!

-Dono (どの), roughly means “lord” or “master”, and lies below sama in its respect level. It’s a title that has almost gone out of use in daily conversation. When it is used, it is usually as a joke expressing an exaggeration of age.

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Here are some honorific titles that can stand on their own:

Senpai (せんぱい), the equivalent of “senior.” This is used for classmates in higher grades and all people with more experience than yourself either at work, club, or in any kind of group.

Kōhai (こうはい), the equivalent of “junior” and the opposite of senpai. As it can appear condescending, it is not used as a suffix.

Sensei (せんせい), is used to refer to teachers as well as people who are experts in their respective fields, whether doctors, artists or lawyers. It shows respect to someone who has mastered some skill.

To go further and master this lesson:

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Now that you mastered Japanese honorific suffixes you can move on prefixes! This video lesson is already available on our website and you will learn why and how to use Japanese prefix!

japanese family honorifics suffixes

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Everything you need to know about Cat Cafes!

Are you traveling in Japan and missing your cat? Maybe you are just looking to cuddle some kawaii felines? Of course you are! The cat cafe, or neko cafe, will be your paradise.

everything you need to know about cat cafe in japan tokyo

Adventure with Risa!
You always dreamt of seeing Risa cuddling some cute cats? Today Risa takes you to a cat cafe and introduces you this trendy concept in Tokyo!

Start learning Japanese with videos starring Risa!

Cat cafe, an original concept
You might be surprised to hear that this concept is not originally from Japan but from Taiwan, where the world’s first cat cafe opened in 1998. After seeing that it attracted many tourists from Japan, a Japanese person decided to bring the concept, which mixes the relaxing and cozy atmosphere of a coffee shop with adorable cats, back to his country. The popularity of cat cafes boomed all over Japan, with more than a hundred shops opening, half being concentrated in Tokyo. Visiting a cat cafe should definitely be on your Top 10 Spots You Must See in Japan list.

Prepare for your visit to a cat cafe with all the vocabulary you need to order!

A solution to busy Japanese urban life
Because of the size of its population, high density, and the price of housing in Tokyo, many Japanese people live in small apartments, which are not convenient for having a pet, or that just don’t allow them. A lot of people would love to have a pet, but they are too busy and would not have time to take care of it. It’s common to see lots of Japanese salarymen relaxing in these cafés. Visiting a neko cafe will allow you to enjoy your guilty pleasure while avoiding any trouble with your rental agreement!

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Cats, a cup of tea and a lot of love
In most cat cafes, for approximately 1000 yen per hour, you have access to unlimited drinks, and after replacing your shoes with slippers, you will have the opportunity to play with various kinds of cats: fat cats, black cats, clothed cats… There are cats to suit all tastes. If you try to communicate with them, just forget about “meow,” it’s all about “nyan”! Sounds that animals make in Japanese are very different from what you know. Have a look at the animals onomatopoeia list, and discover what the fox says!

risa discovers cate cafe in tokyo

The rise of pet cafes all around the world
The concept of the cat cafe has spread all over the world: New York City, London, Paris, Toronto, Sydney, Singapore, Seoul, Bangkok… The world can’t resist petting kittens while enjoying a cup of tea!
In Tokyo, the concept has been applied to other animals so you can now choose whether you’d like to visit a dog cafe, rabbit cafe, owl cafe, snake cafe, hedgehog cafe…or even a goat cafe!

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Learn how to introduce yourself and interact with other customers at the café!

This crazy experience is worth trying for all cat lovers or just those who are wanting to take a break in an original place. Are you excited about visiting one of these kitty corners? Don’t forget to sign up for your Free Lifetime Account and learn enough Japanese to enjoy your trip to a cat cafe!

Top 10 Superstitions in Japan

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In Japan many things are considered to bring good or bad luck. Superstitions are strongly entrenched in Japanese society, and some of them are meant to teach lessons or serve as practical advice. Here is a list of the top 10 superstitions in Japan you must know!

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1) Numbers 4 and 9 are considered to be unlucky numbers because 4 in Japanese is sometimes pronounced し which means “death,” while 9 is also sometimes pronounced く and means “suffering.” In the US, some old buildings don’t have a 13th floor, while in Japan hospitals and some hotels don’t have a 4th floor. Often the room number 4 and rooms 40 through 49 are not there. When you give a gift of a set of plates or cups to somebody, it is usually 3 or 5 rather than 4. So if you are giving presents in Japan, be careful not to give 4.

2) Hearses are probably one of the most important bad luck symbols in Japan. If you see a funeral car passing, you should hide your thumb, making a fist with the thumb inside. The reason is that the thumb is like a parent finger, so by doing this you are protecting them from the spirit of the deceased that lingers around the car. Some people even hide their thumbs when passing a graveyard or a funeral.

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3) When you attend a funeral and come back before you enter your house, you have to throw salt on yourself. Salt kind of cleanses things. When a friend is with you, you throw salt on each other, or on yourself if you are alone.

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4) Another one that is related to night, is that you shouldn’t cut your nails at night. Because if you do that, you won’t be able to be with your parents when they die. One of the main reasons would be that cutting your nails at night may result in your death, so you won’t be able to see your parents die. In the past, they had to use knives or other sharp cutting tools to cut their nails. Which can be quite dangerous at night…

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5) Speaking of night, another superstition that’s related to night is whistling in the night. If you whistle at night, a snake could come out. There are some poisonous snakes in Japan, so you really don’t want them to come out. Whistling is also known to have been used as a sign by burglars and criminals to communicate to each other. It’s better to avoid them too.

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6) There are other animal-related superstitions as well. A black cat is considered to be bad luck nowadays, but this superstition has been imported from the west. So if people see a black cat, they will stop and wait to see which way it goes so they don’t cross its path. Having a spider inside your house at night is bad luck, but if you see it in the morning, it’s good luck.

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7) Japanese people don’t sleep facing north. Someone sleeping face north might receive bad luck, or it could be even worse, as death is known to welcome whoever sleeps facing north.

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8 ) Don’t write a person’s name in red ink, because it is considered as inauspicious. This is due to names on grave markers being red.

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9) There is a lucky cat symbol called maneki neko. It’s a cat with one paw held up. They often have these in shops or places where business is done because it’s supposed to bring good fortune.

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10) There is one more lucky thing that Japanese people might carry called omamori, in their bag or purse. It is a kind of amulet that protects. They have different types of omamori – some are for success in business or study, some are for curing illness, preventing traffic accidents and so on. You can buy them at shrines.

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On the subject of shrines, did you know that in Japan if you are making a big wish, you might consider doing it at a shrine? Traditionally when people need a prayer to be answered, they would just visit a shrine and give money in return.

Now you will be able to understand Japanese people’s behavior in certain situations! Don’t forget to sign up for a Free Lifetime Account to get more cultural insights, lessons and much more